Strange Child Of Chaos

Strange Child Of Chaos

3.7 4
by Brian Morgan
     
 

This is the fascinating story of one of America's greatest singers, Norman Treigle (1927-1975). Born in the South's most exotic city, New Orleans, he was acclaimed as one of history's finest singing-actors, specialising in rôles that evoked villainy and terror, and was a resident star at the adventurous New York City Opera.

In this, the first biography of the

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Overview

This is the fascinating story of one of America's greatest singers, Norman Treigle (1927-1975). Born in the South's most exotic city, New Orleans, he was acclaimed as one of history's finest singing-actors, specialising in rôles that evoked villainy and terror, and was a resident star at the adventurous New York City Opera.

In this, the first biography of the legendary bass-baritone, you will read of his colourful life in New Orleans, his self-destructive life-style, the seeming contradictions in his complex character, his passion for the race-track, his enormous voice and emaciated physique, his electrifying stage-presence and astonishing acting ability, why he never sang at the Metropolitan Opera, and his mysterious, sudden death at the age of forty-seven. Read also of his relationships with his closest colleagues, including Beverly Sills, Phyllis Curtin, Jon Vickers, Plácido Domingo, Michael Devlin, Carlisle Floyd, Julius Rudel, Tito Capobianco and Frank Corsaro.

Based on the singer's private files, years of extensive research, and interviews with many of his relatives, friends and colleagues, Strange Child of Chaos (a quote from Mefistofele, his greatest triumph) is a tale of the troubled life of an incomparable artist of an elemental power, who bestrode the stage for too brief a moment.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780595388981
Publisher:
iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date:
03/27/2006
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
799,723
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.68(d)

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Strange Child Of Chaos 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
stanNY More than 1 year ago
brian morgan is correct in his review of his own book the person who wrote the review is off track norman treigle was very complex person and singer just to write this book the writer brian morgan should get a bravo i saw norman treigle and beive me you saw one hell of performance the book is well done and we should gratefull we have such a book. so if your opera lover buy the book it a well done for such person as complex as he was. stan k opera lover and norman treigle fan
BrianMorgan More than 1 year ago
Reviews written by that coward, "Anonymous," should not see the light of day, and it is shameful that Barnes&Noble publishes such nonsense. My book has been praised by every professional reviewer who has published a critique, as well as by the late Beverly Sills.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Norman Treigle was a major star of the 60s and 70s and it is a disgrace that Bing so high-handedly resisted bringing him to the Met (as he did Beverly Sills). MEFISTOFELE has long been a favorite opera of mine and Treigle's interpretation of the Evil One was unique. Too bad this was never telecast from NYCO. As a major star of the operatic stage, Treigle has long deserved a biography. This one will serve only until a better one comes along. The failings here are poor writing (very amateurish and still plus a love for putting anything he can into parenthese), lack of photos (if he really did have such close contact with the people he mentions couldn't someone have loaned him photos??), and lack of reasearch, that digging out the facts which does take time and effort. Morgan takes what he was given in interviews but that's about it. And for the increasing number of opera fans who rave for mediocre singers, readers are given little of what made Treigle unique. The writer also had a problem with page breaks, often leaving half a page blank and putting a short paragraph on the following page. Including a CD of Treigle would've been helpful for those who never heard him. Other reviwers seem to think a better biography would come from someone who heard Treigle. Not necessarily. Sometimes (such as with Baskerville Press' biography of Corelli), such a biography is short on research but long on the subjective gushings of a fan. Or a relative as was the case in the recent biography of Leonard Warren. Perhaps a writer more versed in writing musician biographies could give us the biography Treigle deserves. This isn't it, sorry to say.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was privileged to know Norman Treigle professionally during the last six years of his life and have many fond memories of him as both a dedicated artist and a very gentle gentleman. Therefore it was with mixed feelings that I anticipated the publication of this first biography. While the story is long overdue I did not want to see a 'celebrity bio' pandering to the myriad urban legends that have grown up around Treigle almost from the first time he set foot on a New York stage. Brian Morgan has done extensive research and given us a chronological account of events while admirably resisting any temptation to speculate where the facts are not known. This can be frustrating to the reader at times as the known facts are frequently scarce. While we are given the what, when, where and with-whom of hundreds of performances along with the critical reaction, there isn't much of what happened offstage to make those performances happen. An opera performance is much like the proverbial tip of the iceberg - what one sees onstage is only about 10% of what went into the whole production. It would have been very interesting to have been given more insight into the working methods that made Treigle's style (in the words of a journalist of the time) 'so unique that it might as well be patented.' Perhaps Mr. Morgan found his sources as unable to explain those working methods as Mr. Treigle's many imitators have been unable to reproduce the results. On the whole I feel that I can strongly recommend this biography both to those of us who were lucky enought to have seen Mr. Treigle perform and to those who know only the handful of recordings and scraps of viseo that survive. Sadly, Mr. Morgan is, himself, amongst the latter group. Considering all of his dedicated work on this book it would be a just reward if he could be allowed to time travel back to some of those performances.