Strange Son: Two Mothers, Two Sons, and the Quest to Unlock the Hidden World of Autism [NOOK Book]

Overview

The groundbreaking true story of two mothers, worlds apart, united in a struggle to connect with their autistic sons.

Emmy(r)-winning art director Portia Iversen's life was turned upside down when her son Dov was diagnosed with autism. But when she heard a miraculous story of a woman in India who had taught her own severely autistic son to communicate, she brought Soma and Tito Mukhopadhyay from Bangalore to America to help researchers ...
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Strange Son: Two Mothers, Two Sons, and the Quest to Unlock the Hidden World of Autism

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Overview

The groundbreaking true story of two mothers, worlds apart, united in a struggle to connect with their autistic sons.

Emmy(r)-winning art director Portia Iversen's life was turned upside down when her son Dov was diagnosed with autism. But when she heard a miraculous story of a woman in India who had taught her own severely autistic son to communicate, she brought Soma and Tito Mukhopadhyay from Bangalore to America to help researchers better understand this amazing feat. Strange Son is the extraordinary account of two families who made astonishing discoveries about the nature of autism and redefined how the world can interact with those who suffer from the disorder.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101217511
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 11/6/2007
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 448
  • File size: 602 KB

Meet the Author

Portia Iversen, an Emmy(r) Awardwinning art director, has been a vigorous proponent of autism research since her son Dov was diagnosed with the condition in 1994. Together with her husband, Jon Shestack, she established the Cure Autism Now Foundation (CAN), one of the largest nongovernmental funding resources for autism research worldwide. Website: cureautismnow.org.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 13, 2009

    the novel wasn't all that bad, but the publication was wrongful.

    i must admit that I was intranced by iverson's writing to the start, her descriptions were vivid, expecially in the beginning paragraph. But, after curiosity had driven me to look the book up on the internet, the sentiment and wrongfulness of the novel struck me, and it was extremely dificult to finish. I hadn't thought the book to be overly offensive towards autistic persons, but when I read Tito Mukhopadhyay's personal review of the novel, claiming that it was hurtful and betraying, in the sense that iverson was his friend, at one time, stole away this appreciation. I noticed that, truthful to Tito's words, the author used comparisons such as "beastly" and "martian-like", and had even used some of these to describe her own son. In this novel, Iverson studied Tito's condition, being autism, and attempted to find an explination/prevention for the disease, spending more time doing this, i personally thought, than in spending time with her own son, whom needed her most, along with her husband, left to look over Dove. The novel wasn't tyrant-like towards autistics, but, on behalf that she hadn't gained Tito's permission before publication, is very wrong in sentiment, and therefore shouldn't gain appraisal from thoughtful readers.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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