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Little Lit: Strange Stories for Strange Kids
     

Little Lit: Strange Stories for Strange Kids

by Art Spiegelman, Francoise Mouly
 

The second groundbreaking anthology from the New York Times best-selling team of Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly is here! The everyday world is turned upside down and the ordinary becomes extraordinary in this collection of the strangest tales. From Art Spiegelman's The Several Lives of Selby Sheldrake to Maurice Sendak's Cereal Baby Keller

Overview

The second groundbreaking anthology from the New York Times best-selling team of Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly is here! The everyday world is turned upside down and the ordinary becomes extraordinary in this collection of the strangest tales. From Art Spiegelman's The Several Lives of Selby Sheldrake to Maurice Sendak's Cereal Baby Keller to Jules Feiffer's Trapped in a Comic Book, these stories are sure to entice any young reader. Also included are comics and features by Ian Falconer and David Sedaris, Paul Auster and Jacques de Loustal, Crockett Johnson, Richard McGuire, and Barbara McClintock, a puzzle by Lewis Trondheim, and make-your-own comic-book endpapers from Kaz. Little Lit Strange Stories for Strange Kids continues the tradition of bringing the pleasure of books and reading into the hands and minds of kids.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Once upon a time, picture books got parental approval and pulp comics were a sneaky pleasure. In this sequel to Little Lit, Spiegelman and Mouly create a hybrid of the two that may well appeal to oddballs of all ages. Charles Burns leads the charge with his high-impact cover image of an alien reading a boy's space comics. The alien has kewpie-doll eyes and a puppyish nose, but its sinewy muscles and lurid green skin pack a perverse threat. In the endpapers, which suggest a pulp-mag correspondence course, Underworld author Kaz offers "Strange Cartoon Lessons" cards ("Bad at drawing legs? Put your character behind a desk"). After these engaging diversions, the treasury trots out stories from the funny-ha-ha to the funny-strange, many dealing with secret identities. Spiegelman invents a boy whose moods materialize as clones; Jules Feiffer's anxiety-prone child gets "Trapped in a Comic Book"; and Jacques de Loustal and Paul Auster collaborate on a melancholy Kafka-esque noir tale. As the title promises, some of the material is disturbing. Maurice Sendak's punny "Cereal Baby Keller" reprises his violent sketch of a ravenous baby that eats its parents; Ian Falconer and David Sedaris team for a gruesome story of a monster that flips inside-out because "Real beauty is on the inside." More benign picks include an exhausting maze game by Lewis Trondheim, and Barbara McClintock's buoyant story of a shadow that breaks loose. A lengthy reprint of Crockett Johnson's Barnaby strip seems misplaced here, but its airy layout and square panels are a strong counterpoint to the condensed, offbeat material. This compendium, with its stellar group of comix and picture-book literati, revels in its dark side andsuggests that "strange kids" are the mainstream. All ages. (Nov.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Strange. Very strange, and disturbing at times. Yet this is the perfect recipe for encouraging older children (especially boys) to read. Younger children will be attracted to the comic-book style format but may be disappointed with the peculiar humor they encounter. Adults/parents will be curious to see what familiar artists have contributed. Crockett Johnson, Jules Feiffer, Maurice Sendak, Martin Handford and others offer a version of entertainment that differs from their usual fare. Some, like me, may be averse to adding this to their library collection simply because of the content and outlandish connotations portrayed. Ian Falconer and David Sedaris' contribution "Pretty Ugly" starts off pretty harmless, but when Anna VanOgre's face freezes into the scariest face of all, she turns herself inside out to become the adorable girl she used to be. In "Posy Simmonds Mr. Frost" we learn that our planet is getting warmer because of a hair dryer. The endpapers are just as unique. Strange Cartoon Lesson cards for budding cartoonists are intended to expand their level of creativity. Those familiar with the earlier Little Lit book, Folklore & Fairy Tale Funnies, may be disappointed with this later work, and its pulp-fiction appeal. It truly is not for everyone. 2001, HarperCollins, $19.95. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Elizabeth Young AGES: 4 5 6 7 8
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-As they did in Little Lit: Folklore and Fairy Tale Funnies (HarperCollins, 2000), Spiegelman and Mouly have drawn on the talents of major cartoonists and illustrators, who render their art in comic-book format to produce a collection of truly bizarre and intriguing tales. There are contributions from Maurice Sendak, Ian Falconer, Jules Feiffer, the late Crockett Johnson, and a host of others. The stories run the gamut from the mildly quirky-such as Barbara McClintock's fanciful tale of a shadow that takes off on its own-to darker, more disturbing selections such as Jacques de Loustal and Paul Auster's "The Day I Disappeared," in which a man separated from his physical being must rescue himself from drowning. The stories all possess a sharp intelligence and unique imagination, and the innovative use of an old format will entice both reluctant and enthusiastic readers to return again and again. Give this to kids who love Jon Scieszka's type of humor and are ready for the next step.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060286262
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/28/2001
Series:
Little Lit Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
9.57(w) x 13.45(h) x 0.52(d)
Lexile:
290L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

The Pulitzer prize winning author of Maus and Maus II, Art Spiegelman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, and grew up in Rego Park, New York. He is also the co-founder/editor of RAW, the acclaimed magazine of avant-garde comix and graphics and the illustrator of the lost classic The Wild Party by Joseph Moncure March. Spiegelman's work has been published in more than sixteen languages and has appeared in The New York Times, Village Voice, and Playboy, among others. He has been a contributing editor and cover artist for The New Yorker since 1992.

Spiegelman attended the High School of Art and Design in New York City and SUNY Binghamton and received an honorary doctorate of letters from SUNY Binghamton in 1995. He began working for the Topps Gum Company in 1966, as association that lasted over twenty years. There he created novelty cards, stickers and candy products, including Garbage Candy, Wacky Packages and Garbage Pail Kids. He began producing underground comix in 1966, and in 1971 moved to San Francisco, where he lived until 1975.

His work began appearing in such publications as East Village Other, Bijou and Young Lust Comix. In 1975-76, he, along with Bill Griffith, founded Arcade, The Comic Revue. His book, Breakdowns, an anthology of his comics, was published in 1977.

Spiegelman moved back to New York City in 1975, and began doing drawing and comix for The New York Times, Village Voice and others. He became an instructor at The School of Visiual Arts from 1979-1987. In 1980, Spiegelman and his wife, Francoise Mouly, started the magazine RAW, which has over the years changed the public's perception of comics as an art form. It was in RAW that Maus was first serialized. In 1986, Pantheon Books published the first half of Maus and followed with Maus II in 1991. In 1994 he designed and illustrated the lost Prohibition Era classic by Joseph Moncure March, The Wild Party. In 1997, Spiegelman's first book for children, Open Me ... I'm a Dog was published by HarperCollins.

Art Spiegelman has received The National Book Critics Circle nomination in both 1986 and 1991, the Guggenheim fellowship in 1990, and a special Pulitzer Prize in 1992. His art has been shown in museums and gallery shows in the United States and abroad, including a 1991 show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

He and his wife, Francoise Mouly, live in lower Manhattan with their two children, Nadja and Dashiell.

The Pulitzer prize winning author of Maus and Maus II, Art Spiegelman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, and grew up in Rego Park, New York. He is also the co-founder/editor of RAW, the acclaimed magazine of avant-garde comix and graphics and the illustrator of the lost classic The Wild Party by Joseph Moncure March. Spiegelman's work has been published in more than sixteen languages and has appeared in The New York Times, Village Voice, and Playboy, among others. He has been a contributing editor and cover artist for The New Yorker since 1992.

Spiegelman attended the High School of Art and Design in New York City and SUNY Binghamton and received an honorary doctorate of letters from SUNY Binghamton in 1995. He began working for the Topps Gum Company in 1966, as association that lasted over twenty years. There he created novelty cards, stickers and candy products, including Garbage Candy, Wacky Packages and Garbage Pail Kids. He began producing underground comix in 1966, and in 1971 moved to San Francisco, where he lived until 1975.

His work began appearing in such publications as East Village Other, Bijou and Young Lust Comix. In 1975-76, he, along with Bill Griffith, founded Arcade, The Comic Revue. His book, Breakdowns, an anthology of his comics, was published in 1977.

Spiegelman moved back to New York City in 1975, and began doing drawing and comix for The New York Times, Village Voice and others. He became an instructor at The School of Visiual Arts from 1979-1987. In 1980, Spiegelman and his wife, Francoise Mouly, started the magazine RAW, which has over the years changed the public's perception of comics as an art form. It was in RAW that Maus was first serialized. In 1986, Pantheon Books published the first half of Maus and followed with Maus II in 1991. In 1994 he designed and illustrated the lost Prohibition Era classic by Joseph Moncure March, The Wild Party. In 1997, Spiegelman's first book for children, Open Me ... I'm a Dog was published by HarperCollins.

Art Spiegelman has received The National Book Critics Circle nomination in both 1986 and 1991, the Guggenheim fellowship in 1990, and a special Pulitzer Prize in 1992. His art has been shown in museums and gallery shows in the United States and abroad, including a 1991 show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

He and his wife, Francoise Mouly, live in lower Manhattan with their two children, Nadja and Dashiell.

Françoise Mouly joined The New Yorker as art editor in April 1993.

She co-founded Raw Books & Graphics in 1977, and for fifteen years published artists' monographs and the annual "Streets of Soho and Tribeca Map & Guide." Ms. Mouly has also served as the publisher, designer, and co-editor with her husband, Art Spiegelman, of the pioneering avant-garde comics anthology RAW, which launched in 1980. This is the magazine that first brought acclaim to artists such as Charles Burns, Sue Coe, Gary Panter, Chris Ware, Lorenzo Mattotti, and Xavier Mariscal. It also first published Maus, Mr. Spiegelman's Pulitzer Prize-winning comic book on the Holocaust. From 1987 to 1995 Ms. Mouly edited, designed and packaged books for Pantheon and Penguin Books.

In the past year, Ms. Mouly and Mr. Spiegelman have launched a RAW Junior division and have collaborated on an anthology of comic strip stories for children, Little Lit.

To commemorate The New Yorker's 75th anniversary, Ms. Mouly curated an exhibit of contemporary cover art at the Galleria Comunale d'Arte Moderna in Rome, and guest-curated a selection of a show at the Whilhelm-Busch Museum in Hannover, Germany.

In the fall of 2000, Abbeville will release Ms. Mouly's book, Covering the New Yorker, a compilation of over 300 timeless New Yorker covers.

Born in Paris, Françoise Mouly studied architecture at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts and moved to New York in 1974. She and her husband, Art Spiegelman, live in Manhattan with their two children, Nadja and Dashiell.

Françoise Mouly joined The New Yorker as art editor in April 1993.

She co-founded Raw Books & Graphics in 1977, and for fifteen years published artists' monographs and the annual "Streets of Soho and Tribeca Map & Guide." Ms. Mouly has also served as the publisher, designer, and co-editor with her husband, Art Spiegelman, of the pioneering avant-garde comics anthology RAW, which launched in 1980. This is the magazine that first brought acclaim to artists such as Charles Burns, Sue Coe, Gary Panter, Chris Ware, Lorenzo Mattotti, and Xavier Mariscal. It also first published Maus, Mr. Spiegelman's Pulitzer Prize-winning comic book on the Holocaust. From 1987 to 1995 Ms. Mouly edited, designed and packaged books for Pantheon and Penguin Books.

In the past year, Ms. Mouly and Mr. Spiegelman have launched a RAW Junior division and have collaborated on an anthology of comic strip stories for children, Little Lit.

To commemorate The New Yorker's 75th anniversary, Ms. Mouly curated an exhibit of contemporary cover art at the Galleria Comunale d'Arte Moderna in Rome, and guest-curated a selection of a show at the Whilhelm-Busch Museum in Hannover, Germany.

In the fall of 2000, Abbeville will release Ms. Mouly's book, Covering the New Yorker, a compilation of over 300 timeless New Yorker covers.

Born in Paris, Françoise Mouly studied architecture at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts and moved to New York in 1974. She and her husband, Art Spiegelman, live in Manhattan with their two children, Nadja and Dashiell.

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