Strangers in the Ethnic Homeland: Japanese Brazilian Return Migration in Transnational Perspective

Strangers in the Ethnic Homeland: Japanese Brazilian Return Migration in Transnational Perspective

by Takeyuki Tsuda
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Since the late 1980s, Brazilians of Japanese descent have been "return" migrating to Japan as unskilled foreign workers. With an immigrant population currently estimated at roughly 280,000, Japanese Brazilians are now the second largest group of foreig

Overview

Since the late 1980s, Brazilians of Japanese descent have been "return" migrating to Japan as unskilled foreign workers. With an immigrant population currently estimated at roughly 280,000, Japanese Brazilians are now the second largest group of foreig

Editorial Reviews

American Journal of Sociology - Aya Ezawa

Strangers in the Ethnic Homeland raises important questions that urge us to think about ethnic and national identities in new ways.

Pacific Reader
A thorough job of scholarship. However, what makes this lively reading is Tsuda's description about the lives of immigrants and the Japanese who interacted with them.

— Chizu Omori

Journal of Japanese Studies
...encyclopedic, and for anyone venturing on a serious study of the Brazilian Nikkeijin in Japan in the future, it will be a resource bible.

— Daniela DeCarvalho

American Journal of Sociology
Strangers in the Ethnic Homeland raises important questions that urge us to think about ethnic and national identities in new ways.

— Aya Ezawa

Pacific Reader - Chizu Omori

A thorough job of scholarship. However, what makes this lively reading is Tsuda's description about the lives of immigrants and the Japanese who interacted with them.

Journal of Japanese Studies - Daniela DeCarvalho

...encyclopedic, and for anyone venturing on a serious study of the Brazilian Nikkeijin in Japan in the future, it will be a resource bible.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231502344
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
01/05/2003
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
File size:
5 MB

What People are saying about this

George A De Vos

A noteworthy addition to studies in labor migration that sets new standards.

Wayne Cornelius

A path-breaking study of the ethnic Japanese-Brazilians.... This will be a wonderful teaching book.

Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco

This is the book all of us interested in the comparative study of immigration have been waiting for. It is a masterpiece work of exquisite ethnographic detail, theoretical excellence, and conceptual maturity written by a cosmopolitan intellectual. Tsuda's ethnographic empathy, uncanny sense for place and mood, and well-channeled interdisciplinary impulses suggests to me that this book will set the standard for all subsequent anthropological work on immigration in Japan.

Saskia Sassen

This is an inquiry into some of the more elusive aspects of migration. The book is particularly effective in showing how migrants constitute their identities in ways that do not fit in either country of origin or destination and how these evolving identities themselves contribute to reproduce migration. A brilliant study!

Meet the Author

Takeyuki Tsuda is the associate director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California at San Diego.


Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >