Strategies for Teaching First-Year Composition

Overview

Both experienced and new teachers from community colleges, liberal arts colleges, state universities, and research institutions throughout the U.S. contribute over 90 articles to this guide for new teaching assistants and college/university instructors. The essays are grouped into sections on the contexts for teaching writing; curriculum; designing syllabus materials; creating effective writing assignments; teaching students to build reflective portfolios; strategies for course management; invention strategies ...
See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$44.26
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$46.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $12.95   
  • New (2) from $36.05   
  • Used (10) from $12.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

Both experienced and new teachers from community colleges, liberal arts colleges, state universities, and research institutions throughout the U.S. contribute over 90 articles to this guide for new teaching assistants and college/university instructors. The essays are grouped into sections on the contexts for teaching writing; curriculum; designing syllabus materials; creating effective writing assignments; teaching students to build reflective portfolios; strategies for course management; invention strategies and activities; peer-response activities; responding to in-process work to promote revision; responding to and evaluating polished writing; teaching writing with technology; constructing a teaching portfolio; teaching grammar, usage, and style; and teaching research skills. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814147498
  • Publisher: National Council of Teachers of Englsh
  • Publication date: 6/28/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 626

Table of Contents

Introduction xv
Acknowledgments xxxiii
1 Contexts for Teaching Writing 1
The Departmental Perspective 2
Composition, Community, and Curriculum: A Letter to New Composition Teachers 11
A Supervisor's Perspective 17
A Cultural Perspective: Teaching Composition at a Historically Black University 21
An Experienced TA's Reflections on the TA Experience 34
Writing and Learning to Write: A Modest Bit of History and Theory for Writing Students 38
The Importance of Framing the Writing Classroom as a Space of Public Discourse 44
"Black people tend to talk eubonics": Race and Curricular Diversity in Higher Education 46
Rhetorical Situations and Assignment Sheets 51
Meeting of Narratives, Meeting of Minds: WPAs, TAs, and Transferring Independence 53
Students as Audience 62
Memo from a Provost 65
2 Seeing the Forest and the Trees of Curriculum 68
Teaching in an Idealized Outcomes-Based First-Year Writing Program 69
Constructing Bridges between High School and College Writing 89
Teaching Writing as a Process 92
3 Constructing Syllabus Materials 97
On Syllabi 98
Departmental Syllabus: Experience in Writing 102
An Honors Course in First-Year Composition: Classical Rhetoric and Contemporary Writing 114
4 Constructing Effective Writing Assignments 133
Sequencing Writing Projects in Any Composition Class 134
Autobiography: The Rhetorical Efficacy of Self-Reflection/Articulation 137
Deliberative Writing 143
Rhetorical Analysis: Terms of Contention 145
Assignment Prompt 150
Profile Assignment 152
Picture Exchange: Sharing Images and Ideas in First-Year Composition 164
Reflecting on Journal Writing 167
Role-Playing as a Writing-to-Learn Activity 171
Writing-to-Learn Prompts 176
5 Guiding Students to Construct Reflective Portfolios 181
A Writing Portfolio Assignment 182
Portfolio Requirements for Writing and Discourse 186
The Importance of Student Portfolio Presentations in Composition Courses 189
Group Portfolio Presentations 195
6 Strategies for Course Management 203
Fostering Classroom Civility 204
Course Management Guidelines 212
Facilitating Class Discussion 216
A Structure for a Successful Class Session 219
A Strategy for Student-Led Writing and Discussion 220
Strategies for Discouraging Plagiarism 224
Working with Groups 226
Discussing Time Commitments with Students 228
7 Teaching Invention 230
Teaching Invention 231
Invention Activity 234
Invention as a Strategy of Revision 236
A Model for Invention 240
To Whom It Might Actually Concern: Letter Writing as Invention in First-Year Composition 249
Invention Activity Late in the Writing Process 252
Writing Exercise--Connections 262
Exploring Topics: Rationale for a Class Exercise 267
Teaching "Organization": Transition Moments, Cueing Systems, and Modes of Coherence 269
8 Orchestrating Peer-Response Activities 289
Approaches to Productive Peer Review 290
Reflection on Peer-Review Practices 301
Using Group Conferences to Respond to Essays in Progress 307
A Possible Sequence of Peer-Group Responses to a Student's Emerging Text--Autobiographical Essay 318
9 Responding to In-Process Work to Promote Revision 325
Less Is More in Response to Student Writing 326
One Dimension of Response to Student Writing: How Students Construct Their Critics 329
Another Kind of Teacher-Student Talk: Conversational Responding and Revising 338
Guidelines for Responding to Student Writing 355
Why Student Conferences Are Important 366
Expanding the Uses of Writing Centers 367
Writing Center Consultations 372
10 Responding to and Evaluating Polished Writing 386
Developing Rubrics for Instruction and Evaluation 387
What Makes Writing "Good"?/What Makes a "Good" Writer? 401
Contexts and Criteria for Evaluating Student Writing 404
Portfolio Standards for English 101 422
Handling the Confrontative Conference 432
Establishing Weighted Criteria for Evaluating Writing 435
11 Teaching Writing with Technology 437
Overviews and Impressions of Teaching with Technology 438
Overcoming the Unknown 438
Asynchronous Online Teaching 440
Suggestions for the Computer-Mediated Classroom 453
Class Peer Review in a Computer-Mediated
Classroom: Using Classroom Projection Capabilities and E-mail Messages 453
Web Page "Place" Assignment and Analysis Assignment 458
Using the Web to Enhance Students' Critical Literacy Skills 464
Working in an Electronic Classroom 470
Teaching Composition with International Students in an Electronic Classroom 479
Approaches to Using Computer Technology When You Don't Teach in an Electronic Classroom 482
12 Constructing a Teaching Portfolio 494
Teaching-Portfolio Potential and Concerns: A Brief Review 495
Thinking about Your Teaching Portfolio 501
A Philosophy of Teaching: Backseat Driving 505
Statement of Teaching Philosophy 508
Reflection on Teaching 511
Statement of Teaching Philosophy 513
Teaching Philosophy 515
13 Teaching Matters of Grammar, Usage, and Style 522
A Cautionary Introduction 523
And the Question Is This--"What Lessons Can We, as Writers, Take from This Reading for Our Own Writing?" 527
Empowering Sentences 536
Teaching Style 546
Parallel Structures 550
Sector Analysis 559
Encouraging Editing 566
14 Teaching Research Skills 569
First-Year Composition as an Introduction to Academic Discourse 570
Teaching Research Skills in the First-Year Composition Class 583
Situating Research: Writing Research Proposals in First-Year Composition 600
An Assignment for Encouraging Research 609
Citing Ourselves: Students as Specialists and Scholars 611
Index 613
Editors 625
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)