Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring / Nielsen: Symphony No. 5

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Scott Paulin
Igor Stravinsky and Carl Nielsen are more likely candidates for a game of "six degrees of separation" than for sharing a compact disc -- but the thought-provoking experience of hearing these two masterpieces back to back is gratifying in itself. Stravinsky's Rite of Spring and Nielsen's Fifth Symphony share an unusual opening gambit: a deceptively calm bassoon solo leading to explosive violence. Stravinsky goes on to revel in savagery the ballet culminates in a sacrificial victim dancing herself to death, after all. Nielsen -- a decade later, after World War I -- uses music quite differently, pitting harrowing violence against forces striving to overcome it. Stravinsky ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Scott Paulin
Igor Stravinsky and Carl Nielsen are more likely candidates for a game of "six degrees of separation" than for sharing a compact disc -- but the thought-provoking experience of hearing these two masterpieces back to back is gratifying in itself. Stravinsky's Rite of Spring and Nielsen's Fifth Symphony share an unusual opening gambit: a deceptively calm bassoon solo leading to explosive violence. Stravinsky goes on to revel in savagery the ballet culminates in a sacrificial victim dancing herself to death, after all. Nielsen -- a decade later, after World War I -- uses music quite differently, pitting harrowing violence against forces striving to overcome it. Stravinsky has the reputation for being the more radical modernist, yet Nielsen's work may be the more enigmatic and surprising, containing one of the most bizarre yet effective passages of the entire orchestral repertoire: an improvisational snare drum solo with the player directed "to stop the progress of the orchestra." But the drummer here has to contend with the resolute baton of conductor Paavo Järvi, an inspirational guide for his orchestra and the listener alike. Järvi has lately led the Cincinnati Symphony in several top-notch recordings including a disc of Stravinsky's other two great early ballets, Petrouchka and The Firebird; their partnership is one of the most promising on today's orchestral scene, especially as captured by Telarc's superb sonics. If this Rite can't quite match the raw brutality of Valery Gergiev's Kirov Orchestra version, its climaxes are still as thunderous as one could wish. Järvi and his forces seem more sympathetic, however, to the aesthetic and ethical alternative of Nielsen's progression from darkness into light -- an option that listeners, too, may find worthy of contemplation.
All Music Guide - James Leonard
Paavo Järvi may be the real thing, may be that all-too-rare real thing: the great conductor. His recordings over the past decade have always shown insight, strength, and innate musicality, and his later recordings with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra for Telarc show a growing maturity of interpretive depth. But while Järvi's 2004 recording coupling Stravinsky's "Le sacra du printemps" with Nielsen's "Symphony No. 5" has its considerable merits, it also reveals an unsuspected flaw. Järvi's "Le sacra" is marvelously colored and wonderfully shaped, but it lacks drive. Järvi's "Symphony No. 5" is powerfully argued and gloriously formed, but it lacks purpose. In both works, Järvi has created imposing sculptures, but they lack the movement of dance or motion of music. Järvi has made great recordings before and he may make great recordings again because Järvi may be a great conductor, but this recording isn't one of them. Telarc's digital sound keeps getting better and better. This disc one is so real you can smell it.
Time Out New York - Ben Finane
The Rite of Spring is already represented by a fistful of great recordings, but a new one must now be added to the shortlist. Järvi and his Cincinnati Symphony players achieve a bold and deliberate interpretation -- coldly detached, yet utterly engaging. The conductor proves himself a master of building and sustaining tension.

The Rite of Spring is already represented by a fistful of great recordings, but a new one must now be added to the shortlist. Järvi and his Cincinnati Symphony players achieve a bold and deliberate interpretation -- coldly detached, yet utterly engaging. The conductor proves himself a master of building and sustaining tension.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/28/2004
  • Label: Telarc
  • UPC: 089408061523
  • Catalog Number: 80615
  • Sales rank: 210,344

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1–14 Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), ballet in 2 parts for orchestra - Igor Stravinsky & Anilda Carrasquillo (35:14)
  2. 15–20 Symphony No. 5, FS 97 (Op. 50) - Carl Nielsen & Anilda Carrasquillo (37:43)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Paavo Järvi Primary Artist
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