Streaming: Movies, Media, and Instant Access [NOOK Book]

Overview

Film stocks are vanishing, but the iconic images of the silver screen remain -- albeit in new, sleeker formats. Today, viewers can instantly stream movies on televisions, computers, and smartphones. Gone are the days when films could only be seen in theaters or rented at video stores: movies are now accessible at the click of a button, and there are no reels, tapes, or discs to store. Any film or show worth keeping may be collected in the virtual cloud and accessed at will ...

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Streaming: Movies, Media, and Instant Access

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Overview

Film stocks are vanishing, but the iconic images of the silver screen remain -- albeit in new, sleeker formats. Today, viewers can instantly stream movies on televisions, computers, and smartphones. Gone are the days when films could only be seen in theaters or rented at video stores: movies are now accessible at the click of a button, and there are no reels, tapes, or discs to store. Any film or show worth keeping may be collected in the virtual cloud and accessed at will through services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Instant.

The movies have changed, and we are changing with them. The ways we communicate, receive information, travel, and socialize have all been revolutionized. In Streaming, Wheeler Winston Dixon reveals the positive and negative consequences of the transition to digital formatting and distribution, exploring the ways in which digital cinema has altered contemporary filmmaking and our culture. Many industry professionals and audience members feel that the new format fundamentally alters the art, while others laud the liberation of the moving image from the "imperfect" medium of film, asserting that it is both inevitable and desirable. Dixon argues that the change is neither good nor bad; it's simply a fact.

Hollywood has embraced digital production and distribution because it is easier, faster, and cheaper, but the displacement of older technology will not come without controversy. This groundbreaking book illuminates the challenges of preserving media in the digital age and explores what stands to be lost, from the rich hues of traditional film stocks to the classic movies that are not profitable enough to offer in streaming formats. Dixon also investigates the financial challenges of the new distribution model, the incorporation of new content such as webisodes, and the issue of ownership in an age when companies have the power to pull purchased items from consumer devices at their own discretion.

Streaming touches on every aspect of the shift to digital production and distribution. It explains not only how the new technology is affecting movies, music, books, and games, but also how instant access is permanently changing the habits of viewers and influencing our culture.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Dixon, a professor of film studies and English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, has a long history of compelling publications about film. His books include A History of Horror (2010), Visions of the Apocalpyse: Spectables of Destruction in American Cinema (2003), Disaster and Memory: Celebrity Culture and the Crisis of Hollywood Cinema (2009), Death of the Moguls: The End of Classical Hollywood (2012), and Film: Talk Directors at Work (2007). He is also coeditor in chief of the Quarterly Review of Film and Video. -- Moving Image Archive News" -- Moving Image Archive News

"This is a very interesting book...It's no-technical, and very easy to read. It's also very much worth checking out." -- The Midwest Book Review

Library Journal
10/01/2013
The streaming of media content is revolutionizing how consumers access movies, music, and literature. Dixon examines the influence of this technological shift on contemporary filmmaking and viewing and its wider impact for consumers of all types. The author (film studies, Univ. of Nebraska; coeditor, Quarterly Review of Film and Video; A History of Horror; Film Talk: Directors at Work), an authoritative source on the subject, briefly tells readers how streaming video works and how the shift toward digitization has changed the industry playing field and describes emerging technologies that will continue to affect the consumer experience. Dixon also explores the consequences of the disappearance of film stock on filmmakers, particularly small, independent ones, and what he calls the "lost age of Classicism." At fewer than 200 pages, the book is broad and general rather than exhaustive and academic. Dixon succeeds in creating an engaging and interesting read that summarizes how streaming is changing both entertainment production and consumption in far-reaching ways. VERDICT This title will appeal to readers interested in the current film industry and developing digital technology.—Dave Valencia, Seattle P.L.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813142180
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • Publication date: 4/19/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 184
  • File size: 295 KB

Meet the Author

Wheeler Winston Dixon, James Ryan Endowed Professor of Film Studies and professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, is coeditor in chief of the Quarterly Review of Film and Video and the author of numerous books, including A History of Horror, Visions of the Apocalypse: Spectacles of Destruction in American Cinema, and Film Talk: Directors at Work.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    URGENT

    Celestialkit is locked out of main camp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Ambertree

    *nodds and dips her head leaving*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    Leopardstar

    Darn...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2013

    Meow

    Chapter Five What the Waves Take
    ——————————————————
    Stormfern swam into the deeper side of camp. It had been four moons since he had lost Mistypaw. He had found a new mate in Vinesplash, but he never lost his loyalty to Mistypaw. He just wished she hadnt died... Vinesplash was expectibg hee first litter of kits soon. He wa shappy... but he wished they wdre Mistypaw's. The sky over him had darkened sonce Mistypaw... left. Stormfern sighed. He would never get over it... he just wanted her back

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

    A sign of things to come

    This book gives a thurough analysis of the epic groth of digital entertainment. From streaming movies to e-books, even youtube, it is all covered in depth. - review by Curt Wiser author of the novel, BOX CUTTER KILLER

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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