Strength Training for Seniors

Overview

Wayne Westcott and Tom Baechle, two internationally recognized weight training experts, have written this research-based guide for instructors at health clubs, YMCAs, community centers, nursing homes, retirement communities, and other organizations who want to help older adults reap the diverse, far-reaching benefits of strength training.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Overview

Wayne Westcott and Tom Baechle, two internationally recognized weight training experts, have written this research-based guide for instructors at health clubs, YMCAs, community centers, nursing homes, retirement communities, and other organizations who want to help older adults reap the diverse, far-reaching benefits of strength training.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Steven Hoffman, PT,ATC,SCS(North Hills Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy)
Description: This text addresses exercise considerations for instructors who prescribe strength training for seniors.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide instructors who train older adults with a research based approach to designing strength training programs. This is a worthy objective for this area of strength training. A basic discussion of the many parameters one needs to consider when developing and overseeing fitness programs is provided.
Audience: The target audience is primarily the personal trainer and rehabilitation professional who renders service to the over 50 population group. Physical therapists, athletic trainers, physical education instructors, and physicians will also benefit from this information. The authors are both certified strengthening and conditioning coaches with a wealth of knowledge and experience in health and fitness research as well as practical training. They combine their expertise to present a book that is informative, easy to read, and applicable to all who oversee fitness programs for the over 50 individual.
Features: In addition to standard chapters on training principles, the authors include nutritional aspects for senior trainers and also information for special populations such as those with osteoporosis, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The book is replete with pictures, graphs, diagrams, and demonstrations of proper/improper training techniques which provide the reader with more than enough information to design and implement a legitimate fitness program for the senior client. At the end of the text are references for each chapter, which lends to the scientific validation of the points presented. These references are up to date and plentiful.
Assessment: This book provides information previously unavailable to the health professional who oversees strengthening or conditioning training for the senior members of the population. I recommend that it be used as a resource in all commercial health facilities as well as rehabilitation clinics where information and advice are dispensed to assist the older individual in physical therapy training.
Steve Hoffman
This text addresses exercise considerations for instructors who prescribe strength training for seniors. The purpose is to provide instructors who train older adults with a research based approach to designing strength training programs. This is a worthy objective for this area of strength training. A basic discussion of the many parameters one needs to consider when developing and overseeing fitness programs is provided. The target audience is primarily the personal trainer and rehabilitation professional who renders service to the over 50 population group. Physical therapists, athletic trainers, physical education instructors, and physicians will also benefit from this information. The authors are both certified strengthening and conditioning coaches with a wealth of knowledge and experience in health and fitness research as well as practical training. They combine their expertise to present a book that is informative, easy to read, and applicable to all who oversee fitness programs for the over 50 individual. In addition to standard chapters on training principles, the authors include nutritional aspects for senior trainers and also information for special populations such as those with osteoporosis, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The book is replete with pictures, graphs, diagrams, and demonstrations of proper/improper training techniques which provide the reader with more than enough information to design and implement a legitimate fitness program for the senior client. At the end of the text are references for each chapter, which lends to the scientific validation of the points presented. These references are up to date and plentiful. This book provides informationpreviously unavailable to the health professional who oversees strengthening or conditioning training for the senior members of the population. I recommend that it be used as a resource in all commercial health facilities as well as rehabilitation clinics where information and advice are dispensed to assist the older individual in physical therapy training.
Booknews
Provides instructors of older adults with principles for safe and successful strength training programs. Covers general guidelines, teaching strategies and training procedures, standard free-weight and machine exercises, sample free-weight and machine workout programs, alternative exercises, assessment, special population training, and nutrition. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780873229524
  • Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/28/1999
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: Better Years Ahead Through Strength Training
Chapter 1: Going Strong After 50
Presents 12 reasons why every person over 50 should strength train; shows how a strength training program can be tailored to individual goals, from health to fitness to body sculpting, and how it can be interesting, fun, and
time-efficient.
Chapter 2: Testing Muscle Strength
The three factors that most strongly influence your strength potential; the importance of knowing your current strength levels before beginning your program; two methods for testing your strength (depending on the equipment available to you); how to use the test results to determine your starting loads.
Chapter 3: Strengthening Safely at 50+
Four things to do to prepare properly for strength training (see your doctor; be sure you have appropriate clothing and exercise space, etc.); five factors to consider to ensure safe workouts (use appropriate training loads; follow sensible progression; use correct technique, etc.).
Chapter 4: Selecting the Right Equipment
Discusses how to decide between free weight and machine equipment; considerations for buying barbells, weight plates, and weight benches; how to use the equipment safely. Explains how to select weight machines for home use and safe use of the equipment. Discusses using a personal trainer and how to select one who is right for you should you choose to do so.
Chapter 5: Using Correct Technique
Explains all the exercises needed to design your personal workout. Each exercise is illustrated with two photographs. Includes both step-by-step instructions and appropriate tips. Features 22 machine exercises and 17 free
weight exercises.
Chapter 6: Building an Effective Training Program
Discusses the seven aspects of your program which must be worked out ahead of time, such as exercise selection, order, intensity, and training progression. Explains proper lifting technique, including movement speed and range, and breathing. Offers recommendations for training program setup and variation.
Chapter 7 : Working Out
Provides sample 10-week strength training program for men and women 50 and above. These workouts are based on the exercises featured in Chapter 5 and the guidelines presented in Chapter 6. Each is tailored to the individual's level of strength fitness as determined in Chapter 2. Each training program begins with five basic exercises, and new exercises are added every two weeks. Both machine and free weight equipment are featured. The information is presented in easy-to-read charts, each introduced with appropriate discussion.
Chapter 8: Building Strength, Size, and Stamina
Shows the reader how to continue training after the initial 10-week program, depending on what goals are chosen. Each advanced program begins with a four-week transition period and is followed by two additional four-week
training cycles, each of which increases in training intensity. Features programs for muscle size, strength, and endurance; discusses body re-proportioning. In the Appendixes, training logs for recording workouts and keeping track of progress are provided.
Chapter 9: Eating for Strength
How to eat to help achieve the best results with your strength training program. Discusses the basic nutrients based on the Food Guide Pyramid, including best sources and amounts to eat. Considers the role of water as the most important nutrient. Three steps to take to achieve better nutrition.
Chapter 10: Training Without Weights
Presents simple alternatives to standard strength training with machines and free-weights. Includes body weight exercises and how to increase or decrease their difficulty by varying the technique of each exercise; resistance band exercises; and the use of home-made weights. Discusses endurance and flexibility exercises as an important part of one's fitness program.
Appendix A Training Logs 1-10
Appendix B Training Logs 11-16
Index
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