Stress, Culture, and Community: The Psychology and Philosophy of Stress / Edition 1

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Overview

This original work focuses on how stress evolves and is resolved in the interplay between persons and their social connectedness within family, tribe, and culture. Stevan Hobfoll begins his analysis of stress in modern life by questioning the conventional view of psychology, which until now has individualized the stress process, framing stress as a private, mentalistic burden. In contrast to this view, Hobfoll argues that stress is in the real world, and tied to people's social attachments in particular. He guides the reader through his novel interweaving of scientific inquiry with literary, social, religious, and historical analysis.

Disc. cultural context & basis of stress; ecological theory; coping strategies; social interaction, mental illness.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Focuses on how stress evolves and is resolved in the interplay between persons and their social connectedness within family. The author argues that the conventional view of psychology, which individualizes stress, is wrong, and that a better explanation ties stress to peoples social attachments in the real world. Concerned more with the process than the outcomes of stress formation, he puts forward a theory that states that the primary motivation of human beings is to conserve their social resources in order to protect the self and its social attachments. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
From the Publisher
"May be the most important book on stress and coping since Lazarus's landmark work more than three decades ago."
(Charles D. Spielberger, University of South Florida, Tampa)
"A landmark publication that will change the way people think about stress, coping and social support...The book is a masterpiece."
(Ralf Schwarzer, Free University of Berlin, Germany)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780306484445
  • Publisher: Springer US
  • Publication date: 5/31/2004
  • Series: Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology
  • Edition description: 1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 0.66 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 6.14 (d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The Social and Historical Context of Stress 1
Ch. 2 The Evolutionary and Cultural Basis of the Stress Experience 25
Ch. 3 Conservation of Resources Theory: Principles and Corollaries 51
Ch. 4 Majesty, Mastery, and Malignment 89
Ch. 5 Our Coping as Individuals within Families and Tribes 119
Ch. 6 Marching to a Different Drum, Singing the Same Song 141
Ch. 7 Turbulent Spiral or Graceful Pirouette: Cycles of Resource Loss and Gain 165
Ch. 8 Stress Crossover: The Commerce of Resources across the Borders That Divide and Unite People, Organizations, and Tribes 199
Ch. 9 Aiding Resource Acquisition and Protection in Ecological Context 231
References 265
Author Index 287
Subject Index 293
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