Strong Enough

Strong Enough

by Travis Tritt
     
 

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On the strength of its double-caffeinated blend of hard country, southern rock, and a dollop of soul, Strong Enough seems destined for the platinum trail traveled by its predecessor, Down the Road I Go. On his latest, Travis Tritt isn't tiptoeing through a bunch of meaningless ditties about loving his truck but rather…  See more details below

Overview

On the strength of its double-caffeinated blend of hard country, southern rock, and a dollop of soul, Strong Enough seems destined for the platinum trail traveled by its predecessor, Down the Road I Go. On his latest, Travis Tritt isn't tiptoeing through a bunch of meaningless ditties about loving his truck but rather delivering some personal statements. The roiling "Country Ain't Country" would by its title seem to be another diatribe aimed at the soulless mainstream, but in fact it addresses the breakdown of values and the merciless pursuit of profits at the expense anything spiritual. "You Really Wouldn't Want Me That Way" uses a martial beat, atmospheric acoustic guitar filigrees, and a moaning pedal steel to advance the testimony of a man begging to be accepted for who he is rather than become anyone's "puppet on a string." At the other end of the spectrum, the beautiful, lilting strains of "I Don't Ever Want Her to Feel That Way Again" play like a country art song detailing a man's unremitting remorse over his treatment of a former lover. Tritt digs in on this one, delivering a nuanced, measured vocal that underscores once again his masterful interpretive skills. But the old boy's still got some rambunctious stuff up his sleeve, especially on the tough-as-blue-steel title cut and a ferocious album-closing rocker co-written with his buddy Marty Stuart, "I Can't Seem to Get Over You," fueled by some jangly guitars and jittery rhythms that add scintillating tension to a soaring melody line. Clearly revitalized of late, Tritt picks 'em up and lays 'em down at every turn. This is good stuff, really good stuff.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
After the disappointing performance of 1998's No More Looking Over My Shoulder and his departure from Warner Bros. Records, Travis Tritt mounted a surprising comeback with his Columbia Records debut, 2000's Down the Road I Go. Strong Enough, that album's follow-up, similarly tones down the Southern rock aspect of Tritt's musical palette in favor of a more straight-ahead country sound more acceptable to country radio programmers. In the opening track, the self-written "You Can't Count Me out Yet," Tritt addresses the premature rumors of his commercial demise as well as his return to form. "Some thought I was finally gone for good," he sings, "but those doubters just got rattled/'Cause I'm back in the saddle/Doing better than a body should." If so, it's because he has gotten better at playing the Nashville game, and while the album is not devoid of up-tempo honky tonk material, notably "If You're Gonna Straighten up (Brother Now's the Time)," "Time to Get Crazy," and "I Can't Seem to Get Over You" (each of which Tritt co-wrote), there are many sentimental ballads that look back regretfully on changing times, particularly "County Ain't Country," or treat romantic subjects. Tritt's composition "Strong Enough to Be Your Man," the album's advance single, is an affirmative answer record to Sheryl Crow's 1993 song "Strong Enough," which asked, "Are you strong enough to be my man?" Another good singles choice would be "Can't Tell Me Nothin'," and "You Really Wouldn't Want Me That Way," which also touts the singer's independence, could find a home on radio, too. The irony is that in such songs, Tritt is actually conforming to Nashville's dictates: using standard formulas or co-writing with music row pros, recording with the usual sessionmen. So far, it appears he can have it both ways.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/24/2002
Label:
Sony Mod - Afw Line
UPC:
0696998666023
catalogNumber:
86660
Rank:
97408

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Travis Tritt   Primary Artist,Vocals,Background Vocals
Marty Stuart   Electric Guitar
Eric Darken   Percussion
Eddie Bayers   Percussion
Mike Brignardello   Bass
John Cowan   Background Vocals
Dan Dugmore   Steel Guitar
John Jarvis   Piano,Keyboards
Mac McAnally   Acoustic Guitar
Brent Mason   Electric Guitar
Greg Morrow   Drums
Billy Joe Walker   Electric Guitar
Glenn Worf   Bass
Curtis Young   Background Vocals
Reggie Young   Electric Guitar
Andrea Zonn   Background Vocals
Aubrey Haynie   Fiddle
Neil Thrasher   Background Vocals
Lisa Cochran   Background Vocals
Melodie Crittenden   Background Vocals
Wes Hightower   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Travis Tritt   Producer
Victoria Russell   Creative Producer
Steve Tillisch   Engineer
Billy Joe Walker   Producer
Bergen White   String Arrangements
Ken Fredette   Reissue Design
James LeBlanc   Composer

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