Structural Analysis / Edition 8

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Overview

Structural Analysis, 8e, provides readers with a clear and thorough presentation of the theory and application of structural analysis as it applies to trusses, beams, and frames. Emphasis is placed on teaching readers to both model and analyze a structure. Procedures for Analysis, Hibbeler's problem solving methodologies, provides readers with a logical, orderly method to follow when applying theory.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132570534
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 3/11/2011
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 8
  • Pages: 720
  • Sales rank: 336,095
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

R.C. Hibbeler graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana with a BS in Civil Engineering (major in Structures) and an MS in Nuclear Engineering. He obtained his PhD in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from Northwestern University.

Hibbeler’s professional experience includes postdoctoral work in reactor safety and analysis at Argonne National Laboratory, and structural work at Chicago Bridge and Iron, as well as Sargent and Lundy in Tucson. He has practiced engineering in Ohio, New York, and Louisiana.

Hibbeler currently teaches at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette. In the past he has taught at the University of Illinois at Urbana, Youngstown State University, Illinois Institute of Technology, and Union College.

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Table of Contents

1 Types of Structures and Loads 3
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Classification of Structures 4
1.3 Loads 9
1.4 Structural Design 26

2 Analysis of Statically Determinate Structures 33
2.1 Idealized Structure 33
2.2 Principle of Superposition 46
2.3 Equations of Equilibrium 47
2.4 Determinacy and Stability 48
2.5 Application of the Equations of Equilibrium 59

3 Analysis of Statically Determinate Trusses 79
3.1 Common Types of Trusses 79
3.2 Classification of Coplanar Trusses 85
3.3 The Method of Joints 94
3.4 Zero-Force Members 98
3.5 The Method of Sections 104
3.6 Compound Trusses 110
3.7 Complex Trusses 116
3.8 Space Trusses 120

4 Internal Loadings Developed in Structural Members 133
4.1 Internal Loadings at a Specified Point 133
4.2 Shear and Moment Functions 139
4.3 Shear and Moment Diagrams for a Beam 150
4.4 Shear and Moment Diagrams for a Frame 163
4.5 Moment Diagrams Constructed by the Method of Superposition 168

5 Cables and Arches 181
5.1 Cables 181
5.2 Cable Subjected to Concentrated Loads 182
5.3 Cable Subjected to a Uniform Distributed Load 184
5.4 Arches 194
5.5 Three-Hinged Arch 195

6 Influence Lines for Statically Determinate Structures 205
6.1 Influence Lines 205
6.2 Influence Lines for Beams 213
6.3 Qualitative Influence Lines 216
6.4 Influence Lines for Floor Girders 228
6.5 Influence Lines for Trusses 232
6.6 Maximum Influence at a Point due to a Series of Concentrated Loads 240
6.7 Absolute Maximum Shear and Moment 250

7 Approximate Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures 263
7.1 Use of Approximate Methods 263
7.2 Trusses 264
7.3 Vertical Loads on Building Frames 270
7.4 Portal Frames and Trusses 273
7.5 Lateral Loads on Building Frames: Portal Method 282
7.6 Lateral Loads on Building Frames: Cantilever Method 288

8 Deflections 299
8.1 Deflection Diagrams and the Elastic Curve 299
8.2 Elastic-Beam Theory 305
8.3 The Double Integration Method 307
8.4 Moment-Area Theorems 316
8.5 Conjugate-Beam Method 326

9 Deflections Using Energy Methods 341
9.1 External Work and Strain Energy 341
9.2 Principle of Work and Energy 345
9.3 Principle of Virtual Work 346
9.4 Method of Virtual Work: Trusses 348
9.5 Castigliano’s Theorem 355
9.6 Castigliano’s Theorem for Trusses 356
9.7 Method of Virtual Work: Beams and Frames 364
9.8 Virtual Strain Energy Caused by Axial Load, Shear, Torsion, and Temperature 375
9.9 Castigliano’s Theorem for Beams and Frames 381

10 Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures by the ForceMethod 395
10.1 Statically Indeterminate Structures 395
10.2 Force Method of Analysis: General Procedure 398
10.3 Maxwell’s Theorem of Reciprocal Displacements; Betti’s Law 402
10.4 Force Method of Analysis: Beams 403
10.5 Force Method of Analysis: Frames 411
10.6 Force Method of Analysis: Trusses 422
10.7 Composite Structures 425
10.8 Additional Remarks on the Force Method of Analysis 428
10.9 Symmetric Structures 429
10.10 Influence Lines for Statically Indeterminate Beams 435
10.11 Qualitative Influence Lines for Frames 438

11 Displacement Method of Analysis: Slope-Deflection Equations 451
11.1 Displacement Method of Analysis: General Procedures 451
11.2 Slope-Deflection Equations 453
11.3 Analysis of Beams 459
11.4 Analysis of Frames: No Sidesway 469
11.5 Analysis of Frames: Sidesway 474

12 Displacement Method of Analysis: Moment Distribution 487
12.1 General Principles and Definitions 487
12.2 Moment Distribution for Beams 491
12.3 Stiffness-Factor Modifications 500
12.4 Moment Distribution for Frames: No Sidesway 508
12.5 Moment Distribution for Frames: Sidesway 510

13 Beams and Frames Having Nonprismatic Members 523
13.1 Loading Properties of Nonprismatic Members 523
13.2 Moment Distribution for Structures Having Nonprismatic Members 528
13.3 Slope-Deflection Equations for Nonprismatic Members 534

14 Truss Analysis Using the Stiffness Method 539
14.1 Fundamentals of the Stiffness Method 539
14.2 Member Stiffness Matrix 542
14.3 Displacement and Force Transformation Matrices 543
14.4 Member Global Stiffness Matrix 546
14.5 Truss Stiffness Matrix 547
14.6 Application of the Stiffness Method for Truss Analysis 552
14.7 Nodal Coordinates 560
14.8 Trusses Having Thermal Changesand Fabrication Errors 564
14.9 Space-Truss Analysis 570

15 Beam Analysis Using the Stiffness Method 575
15.1 Preliminary Remarks 575
15.2 Beam-Member Stiffness Matrix 577
15.3 Beam-Structure Stiffness Matrix 579
15.4 Application of the Stiffness Method for Beam Analysis 579

16 Plane Frame Analysis Using the Stiffness Method 595
16.1 Frame-Member Stiffness Matrix 595
16.2 Displacement and Force Transformation Matrices 597
16.3 Frame-Member Global Stiffness Matrix 599
16.4 Application of the Stiffness Method for Frame Analysis 600

Appendices
A. Matrix Algebra for Structural Analysis 612
B. General Procedure for Using
Structural Analysis Software 625
Answers to Selected Problems
Index

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Preface

This book is intended to provide the student with a clear and thorough presentation of the theory and application of structural analysis as it applies to trusses, beams, and frames. Emphasis is placed on developing the student's ability to both model and analyze a structure and to provide realistic applications encountered in professional practice.

Organization and Approach

The contents of each chapter are arranged into sections with specific topics categorized by title headings. Discussions relevant to a particular theory are succinct, yet thorough. In most cases, this is followed by a "procedure for analysis" guide, which provides the student with a summary of the important concepts and a systematic approach for applying the theory. The example problems are solved using this outlined method in order to clarify its numerical application. Problems are given at the end of each chapter and are arranged to cover the material in sequential order; moreover, for any topic they are arranged in approximate order of increasing difficulty.

During recent years there has been a growing emphasis on using computers to analyze structures by matrix analysis. These developments are most welcome, because they relieve the engineer of the often lengthy calculations required when large or complicated structures are analyzed using classical methods. Although matrix methods are more efficient for a structural analysis, it is the author's opinion that students taking a first course in this subject should also be well versed in the classical methods. Practice in applying these methods will develop a deeper understanding of the basic engineering sciences of statics and mechanics of materials.Also, problem-solving skills are further developed when the various techniques are thought out and applied in a clear and orderly way. By experience, one can better grasp the way loads are transmitted through structures and obtain a more complete understanding of the way structures deform under load. Finally, the classical methods provide a means of checking computer results rather than simply relying on the generated output.

Homework Problems

Most of the problems in the book depict realistic situations encountered in practice. It is hoped that this realism will both stimulate the student's interest in structural analysis and develop the skill to reduce any such problem from its physical description to a model or symbolic representation to which the appropriate theory can be applied. Throughout the book there is an approximate balance of problems using either SI or FPS units. The intent has been to develop problems that test the student's ability to apply the theory, keeping in mind that those problems requiring tedious calculations can be relegated to computer analysis. Using the STRAN computer program, included with this book, the student also has a means of checking the solutions to many of these problems, and can thereby be encouraged to apply a computer analysis throughout the course. The answers to selected problems are listed in the back of the book.

Contents

This book is divided into three parts. The first part consists of seven chapters that cover the classical methods of analysis for statically determinate structures. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of the various types of structural forms and loads. The analysis of statically determinate structures is covered in the next six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the determination of forces at a structure's supports and connections. The analysis of various types of statically determinate trusses is given in Chapter 3, and shear and bending-moment functions and diagrams for beams and frames are presented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, the analysis of simple cable and arch systems is presented, and in Chapter 6 influence lines for beams, girders, and trusses are discussed. Finally, in Chapter 7 several common techniques for the approximate analysis of statically indeterminate structures are considered.

In the second part of the book, the analysis of statically indeterminate structures is covered in five chapters. Both geometrical and energy methods for computing deflections are discussed in Chapter 8. Chapter 9 covers the analysis of statically indeterminate structures using the force method of analysis, in addition to a discussion of influence lines for beams. Then the displacement methods consisting of the slope-deflection method in Chapter 10 and moment distribution in, Chapter 11 are discussed. Finally, beams and frames having nonprismatic members are considered in Chapter 12.

The third part of the book treats the analysis of structures using the stiffness method. Trusses are discussed in Chapter 13, beams in Chapter 14, and frames in Chapter 15. A review of matrix algebra is given in Appendix A.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

This book is intended to provide the student with a clear and thorough presentation of the theory and application of structural analysis as it applies to trusses, beams, and frames. Emphasis is placed on developing the student's ability to both model and analyze a structure and to provide realistic applications encountered in professional practice.

Organization and Approach

The contents of each chapter are arranged into sections with specific topics categorized by title headings. Discussions relevant to a particular theory are succinct, yet thorough. In most cases, this is followed by a "procedure for analysis" guide, which provides the student with a summary of the important concepts and a systematic approach for applying the theory. The example problems are solved using this outlined method in order to clarify its numerical application. Problems are given at the end of each chapter and are arranged to cover the material in sequential order; moreover, for any topic they are arranged in approximate order of increasing difficulty.

During recent years there has been a growing emphasis on using computers to analyze structures by matrix analysis. These developments are most welcome, because they relieve the engineer of the often lengthy calculations required when large or complicated structures are analyzed using classical methods. Although matrix methods are more efficient for a structural analysis, it is the author's opinion that students taking a first course in this subject should also be well versed in the classical methods. Practice in applying these methods will develop a deeper understanding of the basic engineering sciences of statics andmechanics of materials. Also, problem-solving skills are further developed when the various techniques are thought out and applied in a clear and orderly way. By experience, one can better grasp the way loads are transmitted through structures and obtain a more complete understanding of the way structures deform under load. Finally, the classical methods provide a means of checking computer results rather than simply relying on the generated output.

Homework Problems

Most of the problems in the book depict realistic situations encountered in practice. It is hoped that this realism will both stimulate the student's interest in structural analysis and develop the skill to reduce any such problem from its physical description to a model or symbolic representation to which the appropriate theory can be applied. Throughout the book there is an approximate balance of problems using either SI or FPS units. The intent has been to develop problems that test the student's ability to apply the theory, keeping in mind that those problems requiring tedious calculations can be relegated to computer analysis. Using the STRAN computer program, included with this book, the student also has a means of checking the solutions to many of these problems, and can thereby be encouraged to apply a computer analysis throughout the course. The answers to selected problems are listed in the back of the book.

Contents

This book is divided into three parts. The first part consists of seven chapters that cover the classical methods of analysis for statically determinate structures. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of the various types of structural forms and loads. The analysis of statically determinate structures is covered in the next six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the determination of forces at a structure's supports and connections. The analysis of various types of statically determinate trusses is given in Chapter 3, and shear and bending-moment functions and diagrams for beams and frames are presented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, the analysis of simple cable and arch systems is presented, and in Chapter 6 influence lines for beams, girders, and trusses are discussed. Finally, in Chapter 7 several common techniques for the approximate analysis of statically indeterminate structures are considered.

In the second part of the book, the analysis of statically indeterminate structures is covered in five chapters. Both geometrical and energy methods for computing deflections are discussed in Chapter 8. Chapter 9 covers the analysis of statically indeterminate structures using the force method of analysis, in addition to a discussion of influence lines for beams. Then the displacement methods consisting of the slope-deflection method in Chapter 10 and moment distribution in, Chapter 11 are discussed. Finally, beams and frames having nonprismatic members are considered in Chapter 12.

The third part of the book treats the analysis of structures using the stiffness method. Trusses are discussed in Chapter 13, beams in Chapter 14, and frames in Chapter 15. A review of matrix algebra is given in Appendix A.

Read More Show Less

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