Structural Concrete: Theory and Design / Edition 5

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Overview

The fourth edition of Structural Concrete: Theory and Design brings this text fully up to date while maintaining its easy-to-follow, logical approach. Working with the text's numerous step-by-step examples, students quickly grasp the principles and techniques of analyzing and designing reinforced and prestressed concrete elements. Moreover, the authors' emphasis on a top quality, economical approach helps students design concrete structures and members with confidence.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118131343
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 5/1/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 1032
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

M. Nadim Hassoun, PhD, PE, FASCE, FICE, MACI, is Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at South Dakota State University.

Akthem Al-Manaseer, PhD, PEng, FASCE, FACI, FCSCE, MIstructE, is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at San Jose State University.

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE: Preface

The main objective of a course on reinforced concrete design is to develop, in the engineering student, the ability to analyze and design a reinforced concrete member subjected to different types of forces in a simple and logical manner using the basic principles of statics and some empirical formulas based on experimental results. Once the analysis and design procedure is fully understood, its application to different types of structures becomes simple and direct, provided that the student has a good background in structural analysis.

The material presented in this book is based on the requirements of the American Concrete Institute (ACI) Building Code (318-95). Also, information has been presented on material properties including volume changes of concrete, stress-strain behavior, creep and elastic and non-linear behavior of reinforced concrete.

Concrete structures are widely used in the United States and almost all over the world. The progress in the design concept has increased in the last few decades emphasizing safety, serviceability and economy. To achieve economical design of a reinforced concrete member, specific restrictions, rules and formulas are presented in the Codes to ensure both safety and reliability of the structure. Engineering graduates to understand the code rules and consequently be able to design a concrete structure effectively and economically with minimum training period or overhead costs. Taking this into consideration, this book is written to achieve the following objectives.
  1. To present the material for the design of reinforced concrete members in a simple and logical approach.
  2. To arrange the sequence of chapters in a way compatible with the design procedure of actual structures.
  3. To provide a large number of examples in each chapter in clear steps to explain the analysis and design of each type of structural member.
  4. To provide an adequate number of practical problems at the end of each chapter to achieve a high level of comprehension.
  5. To explain the failure mechanism of a reinforced concrete beam due to flexure and to develop the necessary relationships and formulas for design.
  6. To explain the failure mechanism of a reinforced concrete beam due to flexure and to develop the necessary relationships and formulas for design.
  7. To provide adequate number of design aids to help the student in reducing the repetitive computations of specific commonly used values.
  8. To enhance the students ability to use a total quality and economical approach in the design of concrete structures and to help the student to design reinforced concrete members with confidence.
  9. To explain the nonlinear behavior and the development of plastic hinges and plastic rotations in continuous reinforced concrete structures.
  10. To provide flowcharts to aid the student in writing their own programs, as the use of computers are needed in the design of concrete structures. Flow charts and computer programs are discussed in Chapter 21.
  11. To provide a summary at the end of each chapter to help the student to review the materials of each chapter separately.
  12. To provide new information on the design of some members, like beams with variable depth, Chapter 8 , stairs, Chapter 18, and curved beams, Chapter 19, that are not covered in other books on concrete.
  13. To present information on the design of reinforced concrete frames, principles of limit design and moment redistribution in continuous reinforced concrete structures.
  14. To provide examples in S.I. units in all chapters of the book. Equivalent conversion factors from U.S. customary units are given in appendix B.
  15. References are presented at the end of each chapter.

The book is an outgrowth of the author's lecture notes that represent his teaching and industrial experience over the past thirty years. The industrial experience of the author includes the design and construction supervision and management of many reinforced, prestressed and precast concrete structures. This is in addition to the consulting work he performed to international design and construction firms, professional registration in the U.K. and other countries, and a comprehensive knowledge of the European Codes on the design of concrete structures.

The book is written to cover two courses in reinforced concrete design. Depending on the proficiency required, the first course may cover Chapters 1 through 11, and part of Chapter 13, while the second course may cover the remaining chapters. Part of the late chapters may also be taught in the first course as needed. A number of optional sections have been included in various chapters. These sections are indicated by an asterisk (*) in the Table of Contents, and may easily be distinguished from those which form the basic requirements of the first course. The optional sections may be covered in the second course or relegated to a reading assignment. Brief descriptions of the chapters are given below.

The first chapter of the book presents information on the historical development of concrete, codes of practice, loads and safety provisions and design philosophy and concepts. The second chapter deals with the properties of concrete as well as steel reinforcement used in the design of reinforced concrete structures, including stress-strain relationships, modulus of elasticity and shear modulus of concrete, shrinkage, creep, fire resistance, high performance concrete and fibrous concrete. Since the current ACI Code gives emphasis to the Strength Design Method, this approach has been adopted throughout the text, except in Chapter 5 where the analysis of reinforced concrete sections by the working stress design is explained enough to enable the student and designer to check the deflection of flexural members under service loads. Chapters 3 and 4 cover the analysis and design of reinforced concrete sections based on Strength Design concept. The behavior of reinforced concrete beams loaded to failure, the types of flexural failure and failure mechanism are explained in the way that differs from other textbooks. It is essential for the student to understand the failure concept and the inherent reserve strength before using the necessary design formulas.

Chapters 5 and 6 deal with the elastic behavior and serviceability of concrete beams including deflection and control of cracking. Chapters 7 and 8 cover the bond, development length, shear and diagonal tension. In Chapter 8, expressions are presented to design members of variable depth in addition to prismatic sections. It is quite common to design members of variable depth in actual structures. Chapter 9 covers the design of one-way slabs including joist-floor systems. Distribution of loads from slabs to beams and columns are also presented in this chapter to enhance the student understanding of the design loads on each structural components. Chapter 10, 11 and 12 cover the design of axially loaded, eccentrically loaded and long columns respectively. Chapter 10 allows the student to understand the behavior of columns, failure conditions, ties and spirals, and other code limitations. Absorbing basic information, the student is introduced in Chapter 11 to the design of columns subjected to compression and bending. New mathematical models are introduced to analyze column sections controlled by compression or tension stresses. Biaxial bending for rectangular and circular columns are introduced using Bresler, PCA and Hsu methods. Design of long columns is presented in Chapter 12 using the ACI Moment Maginifier Method.

Chapter 13 and 14 cover the design of footings and retaining walls, while Chapter 15 covers the design of reinforced concrete sections for shear and torsion. Torsional theories as well as ACI Code design procedure are explained. Chapter 16 deals with continuos beams and frames. A unique feature of this chapter is the introduction of the design of frames, frame hinges, limit state design collapse mechanism, rotation and plastic hinges and moment redistribution. Adequate examples are presented to explain the above concepts.

Design of two-way slabs is introduced in Chapter 17. All types of two-way slabs including waffle slabs are presented with adequate examples. Summary of the design procedure is introduced with tables and diagrams. Chapter 18 covers the design of reinforced concrete stairs. Slab type as well as stepped type stairs are explained. The second type, although quite common, has not been covered in any text. Chapter 19 deals with the design of curved beams. In actual structures, curved beams are used frequently. These beams are subjected to flexure, shear and torsion. Design coefficients are presented in this chapter. Chapter 20, covers an introduction to presteressed concrete. Methods of prestressing, fully and partially prestressed concrete design, losses and shear design are presented with examples. Chapter 21 introduces computer programs as well as flow charts.

The unified design method (UDM) for the design of reinforced and prestressed concrete flexural and compression members is presented in chapter 22. This new approach introduces some basic changes in the design limits. Provisions for this method are introduced in the ACI Code, Appendix B. The author suggests that the concept of UDM to be explained to the students with chapters 3, 4 and 11. Examples of chapter 22 can be presented with these chapters.

Finally, the book is written to provide basic and reference materials on the analysis and design of reinforced concrete members in a simple, practical and logical approach. Since this is a required course for seniors in civil engineering, I believe it will be accepted by reinforced concrete instructors at different universities as well as designers who can make use of the information in this book in their practical design of reinforced concrete structures. Solution manual for all problems will be provided. Software for the design of different reinforced concrete members will also be available.

In the Appendix of this book, design tables using customary units and SI units are presented. All the photos are shown in this book were taken by the author. My sincere thanks to the reviewers of the manuscript for their constructive comments and valuable suggestion. Special thanks are due to the civil engineering students at South Dakota State University for their feedback while using the manuscript.
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Table of Contents

Conversion factors

1 Introduction 1

2 Properties of Reinforced Concrete 15

3 Flexural Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beams 64

4 Flexural Design of Reinforced Concrete Beams 134

5 Alternative Design Methods 172

6 Deflection and Control of Cracking 190

7 Development Length of Reinforcing Bars 221

8 Shear and Diagonal Tension 251

9 One-Way Slabs 300

10 Axially Loaded Columns 318

11 Members in Compression and Bending 331

12 Slender Columns 394

13 Footings 416

14 Retaining Walls 460

15 Design for Torsion 493

16 Continuous Beams and Frames 525

17 Design of Two-Way Slabs 561

18 Stairs 667

19 Introduction to Prestressed Concrete 695

20 Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 758

21 Beams Curved in Plan 828

Appendix A Design Tables (U.S. Customary Units) 857

Appendix B Design Tables (SI Units) 867

Appendix C Structural Aids 875

Index 895

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Preface

PREFACE: Preface

The main objective of a course on reinforced concrete design is to develop, in the engineering student, the ability to analyze and design a reinforced concrete member subjected to different types of forces in a simple and logical manner using the basic principles of statics and some empirical formulas based on experimental results. Once the analysis and design procedure is fully understood, its application to different types of structures becomes simple and direct, provided that the student has a good background in structural analysis.

The material presented in this book is based on the requirements of the American Concrete Institute (ACI) Building Code (318-95). Also, information has been presented on material properties including volume changes of concrete, stress-strain behavior, creep and elastic and non-linear behavior of reinforced concrete.

Concrete structures are widely used in the United States and almost all over the world. The progress in the design concept has increased in the last few decades emphasizing safety, serviceability and economy. To achieve economical design of a reinforced concrete member, specific restrictions, rules and formulas are presented in the Codes to ensure both safety and reliability of the structure. Engineering graduates to understand the code rules and consequently be able to design a concrete structure effectively and economically with minimum training period or overhead costs. Taking this into consideration, this book is written to achieve the following objectives.
  1. To present the material for the design of reinforced concrete members in a simple and logicalapproach.
  2. To arrange the sequence of chapters in a way compatible with the design procedure of actual structures.
  3. To provide a large number of examples in each chapter in clear steps to explain the analysis and design of each type of structural member.
  4. To provide an adequate number of practical problems at the end of each chapter to achieve a high level of comprehension.
  5. To explain the failure mechanism of a reinforced concrete beam due to flexure and to develop the necessary relationships and formulas for design.
  6. To explain the failure mechanism of a reinforced concrete beam due to flexure and to develop the necessary relationships and formulas for design.
  7. To provide adequate number of design aids to help the student in reducing the repetitive computations of specific commonly used values.
  8. To enhance the students ability to use a total quality and economical approach in the design of concrete structures and to help the student to design reinforced concrete members with confidence.
  9. To explain the nonlinear behavior and the development of plastic hinges and plastic rotations in continuous reinforced concrete structures.
  10. To provide flowcharts to aid the student in writing their own programs, as the use of computers are needed in the design of concrete structures. Flow charts and computer programs are discussed in Chapter 21.
  11. To provide a summary at the end of each chapter to help the student to review the materials of each chapter separately.
  12. To provide new information on the design of some members, like beams with variable depth, Chapter 8 , stairs, Chapter 18, and curved beams, Chapter 19, that are not covered in other books on concrete.
  13. To present information on the design of reinforced concrete frames, principles of limit design and moment redistribution in continuous reinforced concrete structures.
  14. To provide examples in S.I. units in all chapters of the book. Equivalent conversion factors from U.S. customary units are given in appendix B.
  15. References are presented at the end of each chapter.

The book is an outgrowth of the author's lecture notes that represent his teaching and industrial experience over the past thirty years. The industrial experience of the author includes the design and construction supervision and management of many reinforced, prestressed and precast concrete structures. This is in addition to the consulting work he performed to international design and construction firms, professional registration in the U.K. and other countries, and a comprehensive knowledge of the European Codes on the design of concrete structures.

The book is written to cover two courses in reinforced concrete design. Depending on the proficiency required, the first course may cover Chapters 1 through 11, and part of Chapter 13, while the second course may cover the remaining chapters. Part of the late chapters may also be taught in the first course as needed. A number of optional sections have been included in various chapters. These sections are indicated by an asterisk (*) in the Table of Contents, and may easily be distinguished from those which form the basic requirements of the first course. The optional sections may be covered in the second course or relegated to a reading assignment. Brief descriptions of the chapters are given below.

The first chapter of the book presents information on the historical development of concrete, codes of practice, loads and safety provisions and design philosophy and concepts. The second chapter deals with the properties of concrete as well as steel reinforcement used in the design of reinforced concrete structures, including stress-strain relationships, modulus of elasticity and shear modulus of concrete, shrinkage, creep, fire resistance, high performance concrete and fibrous concrete. Since the current ACI Code gives emphasis to the Strength Design Method, this approach has been adopted throughout the text, except in Chapter 5 where the analysis of reinforced concrete sections by the working stress design is explained enough to enable the student and designer to check the deflection of flexural members under service loads. Chapters 3 and 4 cover the analysis and design of reinforced concrete sections based on Strength Design concept. The behavior of reinforced concrete beams loaded to failure, the types of flexural failure and failure mechanism are explained in the way that differs from other textbooks. It is essential for the student to understand the failure concept and the inherent reserve strength before using the necessary design formulas.

Chapters 5 and 6 deal with the elastic behavior and serviceability of concrete beams including deflection and control of cracking. Chapters 7 and 8 cover the bond, development length, shear and diagonal tension. In Chapter 8, expressions are presented to design members of variable depth in addition to prismatic sections. It is quite common to design members of variable depth in actual structures. Chapter 9 covers the design of one-way slabs including joist-floor systems. Distribution of loads from slabs to beams and columns are also presented in this chapter to enhance the student understanding of the design loads on each structural components. Chapter 10, 11 and 12 cover the design of axially loaded, eccentrically loaded and long columns respectively. Chapter 10 allows the student to understand the behavior of columns, failure conditions, ties and spirals, and other code limitations. Absorbing basic information, the student is introduced in Chapter 11 to the design of columns subjected to compression and bending. New mathematical models are introduced to analyze column sections controlled by compression or tension stresses. Biaxial bending for rectangular and circular columns are introduced using Bresler, PCA and Hsu methods. Design of long columns is presented in Chapter 12 using the ACI Moment Maginifier Method.

Chapter 13 and 14 cover the design of footings and retaining walls, while Chapter 15 covers the design of reinforced concrete sections for shear and torsion. Torsional theories as well as ACI Code design procedure are explained. Chapter 16 deals with continuos beams and frames. A unique feature of this chapter is the introduction of the design of frames, frame hinges, limit state design collapse mechanism, rotation and plastic hinges and moment redistribution. Adequate examples are presented to explain the above concepts.

Design of two-way slabs is introduced in Chapter 17. All types of two-way slabs including waffle slabs are presented with adequate examples. Summary of the design procedure is introduced with tables and diagrams. Chapter 18 covers the design of reinforced concrete stairs. Slab type as well as stepped type stairs are explained. The second type, although quite common, has not been covered in any text. Chapter 19 deals with the design of curved beams. In actual structures, curved beams are used frequently. These beams are subjected to flexure, shear and torsion. Design coefficients are presented in this chapter. Chapter 20, covers an introduction to presteressed concrete. Methods of prestressing, fully and partially prestressed concrete design, losses and shear design are presented with examples. Chapter 21 introduces computer programs as well as flow charts.

The unified design method (UDM) for the design of reinforced and prestressed concrete flexural and compression members is presented in chapter 22. This new approach introduces some basic changes in the design limits. Provisions for this method are introduced in the ACI Code, Appendix B. The author suggests that the concept of UDM to be explained to the students with chapters 3, 4 and 11. Examples of chapter 22 can be presented with these chapters.

Finally, the book is written to provide basic and reference materials on the analysis and design of reinforced concrete members in a simple, practical and logical approach. Since this is a required course for seniors in civil engineering, I believe it will be accepted by reinforced concrete instructors at different universities as well as designers who can make use of the information in this book in their practical design of reinforced concrete structures. Solution manual for all problems will be provided. Software for the design of different reinforced concrete members will also be available.

In the Appendix of this book, design tables using customary units and SI units are presented. All the photos are shown in this book were taken by the author. My sincere thanks to the reviewers of the manuscript for their constructive comments and valuable suggestion. Special thanks are due to the civil engineering students at South Dakota State University for their feedback while using the manuscript.
Read More Show Less

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