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Structural Steel Design / Edition 5

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Overview

<> Structural Steel Design, 5e, is ideal for undergraduate courses in Steel Design. It is also useful as a reference for civil and environmental engineering professionals.

This best selling text has been fully updated to conform to the latest American Manual of Steel Construction. The material is presented in an easy-to-read reader-friendly style.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780136079484
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/10/2011
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 736
  • Sales rank: 405,479
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Jack C. McCormac is a retired Clemson civil engineering professor named by the Engineering News Record as one of the top 125 engineers or architects in the world in the last 125 years for his contributions to education. McCormac has authored or co-authored seven engineering textbooks, with more than half a million copies now in print. His current books have been adopted at more than 500 universities throughout the world. McCormac holds a BS in civil engineering from the Citadel, an MS in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Doctor of Letters from Clemson University. Named an Alumni Distinguished Professor, he taught at Clemson for approximately thirty-four years before retiring in 1989. He is included in the International Who's Who in Engineering.

Stephen F. Csernak is a Senior Lecturer of Civil Engineering at Clemson University. He earned both his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering from Clemson University. Csernak’s research interests include: Structural Engineering, Wind and Seismic Design, and Professional Registration. Registered as a professional engineer in South Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky, Csernak is also a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers, the American Concrete Institute, and the American Institute of Steel Construction.

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Table of Contents

Contents
Preface iii
CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Structural Steel Design 1
1.1 Advantages of Steel as a Structural Material 1
1.2 Disadvantages of Steel as a Structural Material 3
1.3 Early Uses of Iron and Steel 4
1.4 Steel Sections 7
1.5 Metric Units 12
1.6 Cold-Formed Light-Gage Steel Shapes 12
1.7 Stress—Strain Relationships in Structural Steel 13
1.8 Modern Structural Steels 19
1.9 Uses of High-Strength Steels 22
1.10 Measurement of Toughness 24
1.11 Jumbo Sections 26
1.12 Lamellar Tearing 26
1.13 Furnishing of Structural Steel 27
1.14 The Work of the Structural Designer 30
1.15 Responsibilities of the Structural Designer 31
1.16 Economical Design of Steel Members 31
1.17 Failure of Structures 34
1.18 Handling and Shipping Structural Steel 37
1.19 Calculation Accuracy 37
1.20 Computers and Structural Steel Design 37
1.21 Problems for Solution 38

CHAPTER 2 Specifications, Loads, and Methods of Design 39
2.1 Specifications and Building Codes 39
2.2 Loads 41
2.3 Dead Loads 41
2.4 Live Loads 42
2.5 Environmental Loads 45
2.6 Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) and Allowable Strength Design (ASD) 51
2.7 Nominal Strengths 52
2.8 Shading 52
2.9 Computation of Loads for LRFD and ASD 52
2.10 Computing Combined Loads with LRFD Expressions 53
2.11 Computing Combined Loads with ASD Expressions 57
2.12 Two Methods of Obtaining an Acceptable Level of Safety 58
2.13 Discussion of Sizes of Load Factors and Safety Factors 59
2.14 Author’s Comment 60
2.15 Problems for Solution 60

CHAPTER 3 Analysis of Tension Members 62
3.1 Introduction 62
3.2 Nominal Strengths of Tension Members 65
3.3 Net Areas 67
3.4 Effect of Staggered Holes 69
3.5 Effective Net Areas 74
3.6 Connecting Elements for Tension Members 84
3.7 Block Shear 85
3.8 Problems for Solution 94

CHAPTER 4 Design of Tension Members 103
4.1 Selection of Sections 103
4.2 Built-Up Tension Members 111
4.3 Rods and Bars 115
4.4 Pin-Connected Members 120
4.5 Design for Fatigue Loads 122
4.6 Problems for Solution 125

CHAPTER 5 Introduction to Axially Loaded Compression Members 129
5.1 General 129
5.2 Residual Stresses 132
5.3 Sections Used for Columns 133
5.4 Development of Column Formulas 137
5.5 The Euler Formula 139
5.6 End Restraint and Effective Lengths of Columns 141
5.7 Stiffened and Unstiffened Elements 144
5.8 Long, Short, and Intermediate Columns 145
5.9 Column Formulas 148
5.10 Maximum Slenderness Ratios 150

CHAPTER 6 Design of Axially Loaded Compression Members 163
6.1 Introduction 163
6.2 AISC Design Tables 166
6.3 Column Splices 171
6.4 Built-Up Columns 174
6.5 Built-Up Columns with Components in Contact with Each Other 175
6.6 Connection Requirements for Built-Up Columns Whose Components Are in Contact with Each Other 176
6.7 Built-Up Columns with Components not in Contact with Each Other 182
6.8 Single-Angle Compression Members 187
6.9 Sections Containing Slender Elements 189
6.10 Flexural-Torsional Buckling of Compression Members 191
6.11 Problems for Solution 196

CHAPTER 7 Design of Axially Loaded Compression Members (Continued) and Column Base Plates 200

7.1 Introduction 200
7.2 Further Discussion of Effective Lengths 201
7.3 Frames Meeting Alignment Chart Assumptions 205
7.4 Frames Not Meeting Alignment Chart Assumptions as to Joint Rotations 208
7.5 Stiffness-Reduction Factors 211
7.6 Columns Leaning on Each Other for In-Plane Design 215
7.7 Base Plates for Concentrically Loaded Columns 218
7.8 Problems for Solution 232

CHAPTER 8 Introduction to Beams 237
8.1 Types of Beams 237
8.2 Sections Used as Beams 237
8.3 Bending Stresses 238
8.4 Plastic Hinges 239
8.5 Elastic Design 240
8.6 The Plastic Modulus 240
8.7 Theory of Plastic Analysis 243
8.8 The Collapse Mechanism 244
8.9 The Virtual-Work Method 245
5.11 Example Problems 150
5.12 Problems for Solution 158
8.10 Location of Plastic Hinge for Uniform Loadings 249
8.11 Continuous Beams 250
8.12 Building Frames 252
8.13 Problems for Solution 254

CHAPTER 9 Design of Beams for Moments 263
9.1 Introduction 263
9.2 Yielding Behavior–Full Plastic Moment, Zone 1 266
9.3 Design of Beams, Zone 1 267
9.4 Lateral Support of Beams 275
9.5 Introduction to Inelastic Buckling, Zone 2 277
9.6 Moment Capacities, Zone 2 281
9.7 Elastic Buckling, Zone 3 283
9.8 Design Charts 285
9.9 Noncompact Sections 290
9.10 Problems for Solution 295

CHAPTER 10 Design of Beams–Miscellaneous Topics (Shear, Deflection, etc.) 302
10.1 Design of Continuous Beams 302
10.2 Shear 304
10.3 Deflections 310
10.4 Webs and Flanges with Concentrated Loads 316
10.5 Unsymmetrical Bending 324
10.6 Design of Purlins 327
10.7 The Shear Center 330
10.8 Beam-Bearing Plates 335
10.9 Lateral Bracing at Member Ends Supported on Base Plates 339
10.10 Problems for Solution 340

CHAPTER 11 Bending and Axial Force 346
11.1 Occurrence 346
11.2 Members Subject to Bending and Axial Tension 347
11.3 First-Order and Second-Order Moments for Members Subject to Axial Compression and Bending 350
11.4 Direct Analysis Method (DAM) 352
11.5 Effective Length Method (ELM) 353
11.6 Approximate Second-Order Analysis 354
11.7 Beam—Columns in Braced Frames 359
11.8 Beam—Columns in Unbraced Frames 371
11.9 Design of Beam—Columns–Braced or Unbraced 378
11.10 Problems for Solution 386

CHAPTER 12 Bolted Connections 390
12.1 Introduction 390
12.2 Types of Bolts 390
12.3 History of High-Strength Bolts 391
12.4 Advantages of High-Strength Bolts 392
12.5 Snug-Tight, Pretensioned, and Slip-Critical Bolts 392
12.6 Methods for Fully Pretensioning High-Strength Bolts 396
12.7 Slip-Resistant Connections and Bearing-Type Connections 398
12.8 Mixed Joints 399
12.9 Sizes of Bolt Holes 400
12.10 Load Transfer and Types of Joints 401
12.11 Failure of Bolted Joints 404
12.12 Spacing and Edge Distances of Bolts 405
12.13 Bearing-Type Connections–Loads Passing Through Center of Gravity of Connections 408
12.14 Slip-Critical Connections–Loads Passing Through Center of Gravity of Connections 419
12.15 Problems for Solution 423

CHAPTER 13 Eccentrically Loaded Bolted Connections and Historical Notes on Rivets 430
13.1 Bolts Subjected to Eccentric Shear 430
13.2 Bolts Subjected to Shear and Tension (Bearing-Type Connections) 444
13.3 Bolts Subjected to Shear and Tension (Slip-Critical Connections) 447
13.4 Tension Loads on Bolted Joints 448
13.5 Prying Action 451
13.6 Historical Notes on Rivets 454
13.7 Types of Rivets 455
13.8 Strength of Riveted Connections–Rivets in Shear and Bearing 457
13.9 Problems for Solution 461

CHAPTER 14 Welded Connections 469
14.1 General 469
14.2 Advantages of Welding 470
14.3 American Welding Society 471
14.4 Types of Welding 471
14.5 Prequalified Welding 475
14.6 Welding Inspection 475
14.7 Classification of Welds 478
14.8 Welding Symbols 480
14.9 Groove Welds 482
14.10 Fillet Welds 484
14.11 Strength of Welds 485
14.12 AISC Requirements 486
14.13 Design of Simple Fillet Welds 491
14.14 Design of Connections for Members with Both Longitudinal and Transverse Fillet Welds 497
14.15 Some Miscellaneous Comments 498
14.16 Design of Fillet Welds for Truss Members 499
14.17 Plug and Slot Welds 503
14.18 Shear and Torsion 506
14.19 Shear and Bending 513
14.20 Full-Penetration and Partial-Penetration Groove Welds 515
14.21 Problems for Solution 519

CHAPTER 15 Building Connections 528
15.1 Selection of Type of Fastener 528
15.2 Types of Beam Connections 529
15.3 Standard Bolted Beam Connections 536
15.4 AISC Manual Standard Connection Tables 539
15.5 Designs of Standard Bolted Framed Connections 539
15.6 Designs of Standard Welded Framed Connections 542
15.7 Single-Plate, or Shear Tab, Framing Connections 544
15.8 End-Plate Shear Connections 547
15.9 Designs of Welded Seated Beam Connections 548
15.10 Designs of Stiffened Seated Beam Connections 550
15.11 Designs of Moment-Resisting FR Moment Connections 551
15.12 Column Web Stiffeners 555
15.13 Problems for Solution 558

CHAPTER 16 Composite Beams 562
16.1 Composite Construction 562
16.2 Advantages of Composite Construction 563
16.3 Discussion of Shoring 565
16.4 Effective Flange Widths 566
16.5 Shear Transfer 567
16.6 Partially Composite Beams 570
16.7 Strength of Shear Connectors 570
16.8 Number, Spacing, and Cover Requirements for Shear Connectors 571
16.9 Moment Capacity of Composite Sections 573
16.10 Deflections 578
16.11 Design of Composite Sections 579
16.12 Continuous Composite Sections 588
16.13 Design of Concrete-Encased Sections 589
16.14 Problems for Solution 592

CHAPTER 17 Composite Columns 596
17.1 Introduction 596
17.2 Advantages of Composite Columns 597
17.3 Disadvantages of Composite Columns 599
17.4 Lateral Bracing 599
17.5 Specifications for Composite Columns 600
17.6 Axial Design Strengths of Composite Columns 602
17.7 Shear Strength of Composite Columns 607
17.8 LRFD and ASD Tables 608
17.9 Load Transfer at Footings and Other Connections 609
17.10 Tensile Strength of Composite Columns 610
17.11 Axial Load and Bending 610
17.12 Problems for Solution 610

CHAPTER 18 Cover-Plated Beams and Built-up Girders 613
18.1 Cover-Plated Beams 613
18.2 Built-up Girders 616
18.3 Built-up Girder Proportions 618
18.4 Flexural Strength 624
18.5 Tension Field Action 629
18.6 Design of Stiffeners 634
18.7 Problems for Solution 640

CHAPTER 19 Design of Steel Buildings 642
19.1 Introduction to Low-Rise Buildings 642
19.2 Types of Steel Frames Used for Buildings 642
19.3 Common Types of Floor Construction 646
19.4 Concrete Slabs on Open-Web Steel Joists 647
19.5 One-Way and Two-Way Reinforced-Concrete Slabs 650
19.6 Composite Floors 651
19.7 Concrete-Pan Floors 652
19.8 Steel Floor Deck 653
19.9 Flat Slab Floors 655
19.10 Precast Concrete Floors 656
19.11 Types of Roof Construction 658
19.12 Exterior Walls and Interior Partitions 659
19.13 Fireproofing of Structural Steel 659
19.14 Introduction to High-Rise Buildings 660
19.15 Discussion of Lateral Forces 662
19.16 Types of Lateral Bracing 663
19.17 Analysis of Buildings with Diagonal Wind Bracing for Lateral Forces 669
19.18 Moment-Resisting Joints 671
19.19 Design of Buildings for Gravity Loads 672
19.20 Selection of Members 676

APPENDIX A Derivation of the Euler Formula 677
APPENDIX B Slender Compression Elements 679
APPENDIX C Flexural-Torsional Buckling of Compression Members 682
APPENDIX D Moment-Resisting Column Base Plates 688
APPENDIX E Ponding 697
GLOSSARY 702
INDEX 708

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2003

    Cuts thru the BS

    ...to give the designer the advice they need.

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