The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th-Anniversary Edition / Edition 4 by Thomas S. Kuhn | 9780226458083 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions / Edition 3

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions / Edition 3

3.8 28
by Thomas S. Kuhn
     
 

ISBN-10: 0226458083

ISBN-13: 9780226458083

Pub. Date: 12/28/1996

Publisher: University of Chicago Press


"A landmark in intellectual history which has attracted attention far beyond its own immediate field. . . . It is written with a combination of depth and clarity that make it an almost unbroken series of aphorisms. . . . Kuhn does not permit truth to be a criterion of scientific theories, he would presumably not claim his own theory to be true. But if causing a

Overview


"A landmark in intellectual history which has attracted attention far beyond its own immediate field. . . . It is written with a combination of depth and clarity that make it an almost unbroken series of aphorisms. . . . Kuhn does not permit truth to be a criterion of scientific theories, he would presumably not claim his own theory to be true. But if causing a revolution is the hallmark of a superior paradigm, [this book] has been a resounding success." —Nicholas Wade, Science
 
"Perhaps the best explanation of [the] process of discovery." —William Erwin Thompson, New York Times Book Review
 
"Occasionally there emerges a book which has an influence far beyond its originally intended audience. . . . Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions . . . has clearly emerged as just such a work." —Ron Johnston, Times Higher Education Supplement
 
"Among the most influential academic books in this century." —Choice
 
One of "The Hundred Most Influential Books Since the Second World War," Times Literary Supplement
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226458083
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
12/28/1996
Series:
Foundations of the Unity of Science Series
Edition description:
Third Edition
Pages:
226
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 8.52(h) x 0.64(d)

Table of Contents


Preface
I: Introduction: A Role for History
II: The Route to Normal Science
III: The Nature of Normal Science
IV: Normal Science as Puzzle-solving
V: The Priority of Paradigms
VI: Anomaly and the Emergence of Scientific Discoveries
VII: Crisis and the Emergence of Scientific Theories
VIII: The Response to Crisis
IX: The Nature and Necessity of Scientific Revolutions
X: Revolutions as Changes of World View
XI: The Invisibility of Revolutions
XII: The Resolutions of Revolutions
XIII: Progress through Revolutions
Postscript-1969
Index

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The Structure of Scientific Revolutions 3.8 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 28 reviews.
Tunguz More than 1 year ago
As a practicing scientist and someone who has always been interested in history and the development of scientific ideas "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions" has for long time been the book that loomed large on my intellectual horizon. Thomas Khun's book has for a long time had a reputation as the definitive and seminal work on understanding how new scientific ideas come about and how and why they gain support. Part of my reluctance to start reading this book stemmed from my belief that it would be an overly philosophical work, with a lot of opaque technical jargon, and with very little relevance to actual scientific practice. However, to my great surprise and delight, nothing could be farther from the truth. This book is written in a very matter-of-fact style, and it is easy to understand what Khun is getting at. His own background in science and history of science probably made him very sensitive to the working and thinking of practicing scientists. The insights that Khun has arrived at are still relevant almost half a century after this book has been published. The idea of "paradigm shifts" has even entered the mainstream consciousness, to the point that it can be caricatured in various cartoons and silly t-shirts. However, after reading this book it is not quite clear to me whether Khun wanted this to be a description of the way that science works, or more of a normative prescription for how to arrive at truly fundamental changes in some scientific discipline. This is particularly relevant for disciplines or directions of research that seem to have gotten stuck in some dead end, as has been the case with particle physics for several decades. Whether you are a practicing scientist, someone interested in science, or someone who would like to know more about how scientific breakthroughs happen you'll greatly benefit from reading this book. You may not agree with Khun's every conclusion, but the longevity of the ideas presented here makes them relevant for every serious discussion about scientific endeavor.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Alas, Kuhn will not be remembered for his theories in philosophy of science. For the many ways in which he got it wrong, imprecise, or vague, take a look at Lakatos and Musgrave's 'Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge'. However, Kuhn will be remembered as the guy that got philosophers of science off their collective heinies, and took a serious look at what scientists actually do, rather than what philosophers of science think that they ought to. Philosophy of science, as it is now practiced, is now much closer to history, sociology, psychology, economics, and rhetoric--and it's *much* better for it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book helped me think more clearly about my life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A person believes that science is like religion. In ancient people believe that phenomenon of nature is made of gods. It must be myths rather than beliefs. As a fact of, in science flow of history is intervened between normality and anomality. Kuhn appealed well dual aspects of history of science to readers
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book, that I highly recommend. Having said that, however, this version is not pristine. There are several typos, and characters inserted that should not be there. It does not hinder reading, but it is noticeable and a bit annoying.
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IRF More than 1 year ago
I originally read this book over 30 years ago in a high school AP Poly Sci class. Now as a university professor it informs most of my thinking and research. It tops my list of most important books I've ever read.
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theolosopher More than 1 year ago
This book presents a compelling argument not only for how scientific knowledge is brought about, but Kuhn's work also challenges the reader to reconsider what it means to say that one has "scientific knowledge" about a subject. I highly recommend it to any philosophically-inclined reader as a major work in the philosophy of science in the 20th century.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
A bit of a tough read at times, and perhaps better replaced by a 2 page synopsis, Kuhn's theory of scientific revolution is required reading for anyone interested in the history of science, or any other social science. This is the modern dogma of the history of scientific development, and is increasingly influential in explanations of technological advancement, business change, and others.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kuhn is a master of organizing universally recognized content into a well-stuctured arguement for the nature of change.