Struggle for Democracy, 2012 Election Edition / Edition 11

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Overview

Question how American democracy is developing

The Struggle for Democracy provides students with an understanding of the American political process and with the tools to critically evaluate that process. This text focuses on the role that democracy has played in the American story and asks students how democracy is–or isn’t–revealed in our politics and government. It encourages students to examine how deeply connected politics and government are with historical, economic, and social influences. The Struggle for Democracy both strengthens a fundamental aspect of critical thinking and tells a unique story of our country’s political development.

This text features full integration with the New MyPoliSciLab. MyPoliSciLab includes a wide array of resources to encourage students to look at American politics like a political scientist and analyze current political issues. Political Explorer lets students play the role of a political scientist by investigating issues through interactive data. Core Concept videos discuss the big ideas in each chapter and apply them to key political issues. Simulations allow students to experience how political leaders make decisions.

A better teaching and learning experience

This program provides a better teaching and learning experience–for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning–The New MyPoliSciLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals. MyPoliSciLab is now compatible with BlackBoard!
  • Engage Students–The stunning visual design engages students in the text.
  • Improve Critical Thinking– Learning objectives in every chapter help students focus on important topics.
  • Analyze Current Events–Coverage of the 2012 elections keeps the study of politics relevant and shows how political scientists look at the development of the American political system.
  • Support Instructors– A full supplements package including the Class Preparation Tool in the New MyPoliSciLab is available.

Note: MyPoliSciLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MyPoliSciLab, please visit: www.mypoliscilab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MyPoliSciLab (at no additional cost): ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205950094/ ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205950096.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The Struggle for Democracy is an excellent text for those who want to help their students become engaged citizens and to understand the fundamentals of our government. This text covers all the essentials of American government without overwhelming students with excessive detail and erroneous tangents.”—Laura Schneider, Grand Valley State University

The Struggle for Democracy is perfect for first-year Political Science students. It provides key historical background and introduces students to the key topics and issues surrounding American government in our society today.”—Mary Anne Clarke, Rhode Island College

"The Struggle for Democracy endeavors to give students an explanation for why the American political system functions and governs the way in which it does—not just description."—Richard Unruh, Fresno Pacific University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205909049
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 1/4/2013
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 11
  • Pages: 720
  • Sales rank: 145,289
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Edward S. Greenberg is a Professor of Political Science and a Research Professor of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Ed’s research and teaching interests include American government and politics, domestic and global political economy, and democratic theory and practice, with a special emphasis on workplace issues. He has just completed a multi-year, longitudinal panel study, funded by the NIH, that examines the impact of corporate restructuring on employees.

Benjamin I. Page is the Gordon S. Fulcher Professor of Decision Making at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Ben’s interests include public opinion and policy making, the mass media, empirical democratic theory, political economy, policy formation, the presidency, and American foreign policy. He is currently engaged in a large collaborative project to study Economically Successful Americans and the Common Good.

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Table of Contents

1. Brief Table of Contents

2. Full Table of Contents

1. Brief Table of Contents

PART I: INTRODUCTION: MAIN THEMES

Chapter 1: Democracy and American Politics

PART II: STRUCTURE

Chapter 2: The Constitution
Chapter 3:
Federalism: States and Nation

Chapter 4: The Structural Foundations of American Government and Politics

PART III: POLITICAL LINKAGE

Chapter 5: Public Opinion

Chapter 6: The News Media

Chapter 7: Interest Groups and Business Corporations
Chapter 8:
Social Movements
Chapter 9: Political Parties
Chapter 10: Voting, Campaigns, and Elections

PART IV: GOVERNMENT AND GOVERNING

Chapter 11: Congress
Chapter 12: The Presidency

Chapter 13: The Executive Branch
Chapter 14: The Courts

PART V: WHAT GOVERNMENT DOES

Chapter 15: Civil Liberties: The Struggle for Freedom

Chapter 16: Civil Rights: The Struggle for Political Equality

Chapter 17: Domestic Policies

Chapter 18: Foreign Policy and National Defense


2. Full Table of Contents

PART I: INTRODUCTION: MAIN THEMES

1. Democracy and American Politics

Democracy

Can Government Do Anything Well? How Democratic Are We?

Mapping American Politics: All the States Are Purple

A Framework for Understanding How American Politics Works

Using the Framework

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Candidate for Congress

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: How Do You Measure Freedom?

PART II: STRUCTURE

2. The Constitution

The American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence

The Articles of Confederation: The First Constitution

Factors Leading To the Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention

Mapping American Politics: Equal and Unequal Representation in the House and Senate

Using the Framework

By the Numbers: Did George W. Bush Really Win the 2000 Presidential Vote in Florida?

Can Government Do Anything Well? Encouraging American Economic Development

The Struggle to Ratify the Constitution

The Changing Constitution, Democracy, and American Politics

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Founder

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: How Long Did It Take To Ratify the Constitution?

3. Federalism: States and Nation

Federalism as a System of Government

Federalism in the Constitution

The Evolution of American Federalism

Can Government Do Anything Well? The Interstate Highway System

Mapping American Politics: Federal Dollars: Which States Win and Which Ones Lose?

Fiscal Federalism

Using the Framework

U.S. Federalism: Pro and Con

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Federal Judge

> MyPoliSciLabExplorer: Which States Win or Lose the Federal Aid Game?

4. The Structural Foundations of American Government and Politics

America’s Population

Using the Framework

America’s Economy

By the Numbers: Is America Becoming More Unequal?

America in the World

America’s Political Culture

Can Government Do Anything Well? Backing Research and Development

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLabSimulation: You Are a City Council Member

> MyPoliSciLabExplorer: Can You Get Ahead in America?

PART III: POLITICAL LINKAGE

5 . Public Opinion

Democracy and Public Opinion

Measuring Public Opinion

Political Socialization: Learning Political Beliefs and Attitudes

How and Why People’s Political Attitudes Differ

The Contours of American Public Opinion: Are the People Fit to Rule?

Can Government Do Anything Well? Regulating the Financial System

Using the Democracy Standard

Using the Framework

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Polling Consultant

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: What Do Young People Think About Politics Today?

6. The News Media

Roles of the News Media in Democracy

Mainstream and Nonmainstream News Media

How the Mainstream News Media Work

By the Numbers: How Much Serious Crime Is There in the United States?

Mapping American Politics: The Limited Geography of National News

Effects of the News Media on Politics

Using the Framework

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Newspaper Editor

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Where Do You Get Your Political News?

7. Interest Groups and Business Corporations

Interest Groups in a Democratic Society: Contrasting Views

The Universe of Interest Groups

Can Government Do Anything Well? The Federal Minimum Wage

Why There Are So Many Interest Groups

What Interest Groups Do

By the Numbers: Is There a Reliable Way To Evaluate the Performance of Your Representative in Congress?

Interest Groups, Corporations, and Inequality in American Politics

Using the Framework

Mapping American Politics: Fueling the American Driving Habit

Curing the Mischief of Factions

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Lobbyist

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Can Interest Groups Buy Public Policy?

8. Social Movements

What Are Social Movements?

Major Social Movements in the United States

Can Government Do Anything Well? Old-Age Pensions in Social Security

Mapping American Politics: Worldwide Demonstrations against the Invasion of Iraq

Social Movements in a Majoritarian Democracy

Factors That Encourage the Creation of Social Movements

By the Numbers Just How Many People Were at That Demonstration?

Tactics of Social Movements

Why Some Social Movements Succeed and Others Do Not

Using the Framework

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Social Movement Leader

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: How Are People Involved In Politics?

Chapter 9 Political Parties

The Role of Political Parties in a Democracy

The American Two-Party System

The Democratic and Republican Parties Today

Mapping American Politics the Shifting Geography of the Parties

Can Government Do Anything Well? FEMA and Disaster Relief

Using the Framework

By The Numbers Are You a Republican, a Democrat, or an Independent?

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Voter

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Which Party Governs Better?

Chapter 10. Voting, Campaigns, and Elections

Elections and Democracy

The Unique Nature of American Elections

Using the Framework

Voting In the United States

By the Numbers: Is Voting Turnout Declining in the United States?

Who Votes?

Campaigning For Office

Can Government Do Anything Well? The Environmental Protection Agency

Election Outcomes

Mapping American Politics: Ad Buys and Battleground States

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Voting Registration Volunteer

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Who Votes And Who Doesn't?

PART IV: GOVERNMENT AND GOVERNING

Chapter 11. Congress

Constitutional Foundations of the Modern Congress

Representation and Democracy

By the Numbers: Can Congressional Districts Be Drawn To Include Equal Numbers Of Voters, Yet Favor One Party Over The Other?

Using the Framework

Can Government Do Anything Well? How Congress Made Voting and Citizenship in America More Inclusive

How Congress Works

Mapping American Politics: Majorities, Minorities, and Senate Filibusters

Legislative Responsibilities: How a Bill Becomes a Law

Legislative Oversight of the Executive Branch

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Consumer Advocate

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Can Congress Get Anything Done?

Chapter 12. The Presidency

The Expanding Presidency

Can Government Do Anything Well? The National Park System

The Powers and Roles of the President

Using the Framework

The President’s Support System

The President and Congress: Perpetual Tug-Of-War

The President and the People: An Evolving Relationship

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLabSimulation: You Are a First-Term President

> MyPoliSciLabExplorer: What Influences The Presidents Public Approval?

Chapter 13. The Executive Branch

The American Bureaucracy: How Exceptional?

How the Executive Branch Is Organized

What Do Bureaucrats Do?

Using the Framework

Can Government Do Anything Well? The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Who Are The Bureaucrats?

Political and Governmental Influences on Bureaucratic Behavior

Mapping American Politics: Tracking Where Homeland Security Dollars First Ended Up

Reforming the Federal Bureaucracy

Using The Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are Head of FEMA

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Who Put The 'Big' In Big Government?

Chapter 14. The Courts

The Foundations of Judicial Power

The U.S. Court System: Organization and Jurisdiction

Appointment to the Federal Bench

The Supreme Court in Action

The Supreme Court as a National Policymaker

Can Government Do Anything Well?

Using the Framework

Outside Influences on the Court

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Supreme Court Clerk

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Who Are The Activist Judges?

PART V: WHAT GOVERNMENT DOES

Chapter 15 Civil Liberties: The Struggle for Freedom

Civil Liberties in the Constitution

Rights and Liberties in the Nineteenth Century

Nationalization of the Bill of Rights

Mapping American Politics: Violent Crime and the Death Penalty

Using the Framework

Civil Liberties and Terrorism

Can Government Do Anything Well? The Patriot Act and Protecting Citizens against Terrorist Attacks

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Police Officer

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Should The Government Apply The Death Penalty?

Chapter 16. Civil Rights: The Struggle for Political Equality

Civil Rights before the Twentieth Century

The Contemporary Status of Civil Rights for Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Can Government Do Anything Well? Making “Equal Protection” a Reality

The Contemporary Status of Civil Rights for Women

Using the Framework

Mapping American Politics: Comparing Women’s Progress

Broadening the Civil Rights Umbrella

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Mayor

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Are All Forms Of Discrimination The Same?

Chapter 17. Domestic Policies

Why Does the Federal Government Do So Much?

Economic Policies

Safety Net Programs

By the Numbers How Many Americans Are Poor?

Using the Framework

Can Government Do Anything Well? Enhancing the Nutritional Well-Being of Poor Children

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a Federal Reserve Chair

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: Is Health Care a Public Good

Chapter 18. Foreign Policy and National Defense

Foreign Policy and Democracy: A Contradiction in Terms?

The United States as a Superpower

Can Government Do Anything Well? Providing Health Care for Veterans

Problems of the Post–Cold War World

Who Makes Foreign Policy?

By the Numbers: How Much Do Rich Countries Help Poor Countries Develop?

Using the Framework

Using the Democracy Standard

> MyPoliSciLab Video Series

> MyPoliSciLab Simulation: You Are a President during a Foreign Policy Crisis

> MyPoliSciLab Explorer: How Much Does America Spend On Defense?

> MyPoliSciLab Document: The Declaration of Independence

> MyPoliSciLab Document: The Constitution of the United States

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Federalist No. 10

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Federalist No. 15

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Federalist No. 51

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Federalist No. 78

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Anti-Federalist No. 17

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Marbury v. Madison

> MyPoliSciLab Document: McCulloch v. Maryland

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Brown v. Board of Education

> MyPoliSciLab Document: The Gettysburg Address

> MyPoliSciLab Document: Washington’s Farewell Address

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