Stuart Little (Stuart Little) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Overview

Stuart es el hijo mayor del matrimonio Little, una sencilla familia que vive en Nueva York. Pero Stuart presenta una característica extraordinaria: ¡es un ratón! Su vida, sin embargo, transcurre con naturalidad, y sus aventuras, llenas de ingenioso humor, cautivarán inmediatamente a los jóvenes lectores. Este libro ha tenido tanto éxito en todo el mundo que se ha llevado al cine.

The adventures of the debonair mouse Stuart Little as he sets out in the world to seek ...

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Hardcover (Library Binding - THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY)
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Overview

Stuart es el hijo mayor del matrimonio Little, una sencilla familia que vive en Nueva York. Pero Stuart presenta una característica extraordinaria: ¡es un ratón! Su vida, sin embargo, transcurre con naturalidad, y sus aventuras, llenas de ingenioso humor, cautivarán inmediatamente a los jóvenes lectores. Este libro ha tenido tanto éxito en todo el mundo que se ha llevado al cine.

The adventures of the debonair mouse Stuart Little as he sets out in the world to seek out his dearest friend, a little bird that stayed for a few days in his family's garden.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
How could a mouse be born into a human family? Critics and librarians in 1945 fretted that children would never accept a notion so unbelievable or a story without a neat ending. They need not have worried; New Yorker writer E. B. White's first children's book, Stuart Little, was a huge success. Since he is so tiny (only two inches tall), Stuart suffers many mishaps (such as getting rolled up in a window shade or being dumped onto a garbage scow), but he experiences triumphs, too, like sailing a model schooner safely through a storm on Central Park's boat pond. The little mouse's romantic nature sends him on a journey north in his tiny motor car to seek the beautiful bird Margalo; his more assertive side allows him to cope with a classroom of children on an unlikely assignment as a substitute in a rural school. After several more adventures and a conversation with a friendly and rather poetic telephone repairman, Stuart decides to keep on going. "As he peered ahead into the great land that stretched before him, the way seemed long. But the sky was bright, and he somehow felt that he was headed in the right direction." Garth Williams's perfect pen-and-ink drawings, scattered throughout, rival Ernest Shepard's at their best. In 1970 White received the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for this book and Charlotte's Web. Although at the end, the heroic little mouse disappears down the road leading north, it's unlikely that Stuart Little will ever disappear from print. 1945, HarperCollins, Ages 7 to 12.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781417691111
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/2004
  • Language: Spanish
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
  • Pages: 142
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.75 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

A legendary writer for decades at The New Yorker and the author of many books of essays, E. B. White also wrote the children's classics Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web, and The Trumpet of the Swan. He lived in New York City and Brooklin, Maine.

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Read an Excerpt

In the Drain

When Mrs. Frederick C. Little's second son arrived, everybody noticed that he was not much bigger than a mouse. The truth of the matter was, the baby looked very much like a mouse in every way. He was only about two inches high; and he had a mouse's sharp nose, a mouse's tail, a mouse's whiskers, and the pleasant, shy manner of a mouse. Before he was many days old he was not only looking like a mouse but acting like one, too-wearing a gray hat and carrying a small cane. Mr. and Mrs. Little named him Stuart, and Mr. Little made him a tiny bed out of four clothespins and a cigarette box.

Unlike most babies, Stuart could walk as soon as he was born. When he was a week old he could climb lamps by shinnying up the cord. Mrs. Little saw right away that the infant clothes she had provided were unsuitable, and she set to work and made him a fine little blue worsted suit with patch pockets in which he could keep his handkerchief, his money, and his keys. Every morning, before Stuart dressed, Mrs. Little went into his room and weighed him on a small scale which was really meant for weighing letters. At birth Stuart could have been sent by first class mail for three cents, but his parents preferred to keep him rather than send him away; and when, at the age of a month, he had gained only a third of an ounce, his mother was so worried she sent for the doctor.

The doctor was delighted with Stuart and said that it was very unusual for an American family to have a mouse. He took Stuart's temperature and found that it was 98.6, which is normal for a mouse. He also examined Stuart's chest and heart and looked into his ears solemnly with a flashlight. (Not every doctor can lookinto a mouse's ear without laughing.) Everything seemed to be all right, and Mrs. Little was pleased to get such a good report.

"Feed him up!" said the doctor cheerfully, as he left.

The home of the Little family was a pleasant place near a park in New York City. In the mornings the sun streamed in through the east windows, and all the Littles were up early as a general rule. Stuart was a great help to his parents, and to his older brother George, because of his small size and because he could do things that a mouse can do and was agreeable about doing them. One day when Mrs. Little was washing out the bathtub after Mr. Little had taken a bath, she lost a ring off her finger and was horrified to discover that it had fallen down the drain.

"What had I better do?" she cried, trying to keep the tears back.

"If I were you," said George, "I should bend a hairpin in the shape of a fishhook and tie it onto a piece of string and try to fish the ring out with it." So Mrs. Little found a piece of string and a hairpin, and for about a half-hour she fished for the ring; but it was dark down the drain and the hook always seemed to catch on something before she could get it down to where the ring was.

"What luck?" inquired Mr. Little, coming into the bathroom.

"No luck at all," said Mrs. Little. "The ring is so far down I can't fish it up."

"Why don't we send Stuart down after it?" suggested Mr. Little. "How about it, Stuart, would you like to try?"

"Yes, I would," Stuart replied, "but I think I'd better get into my old pants. I imagine it's wet down there."

"It's all of that," said George, who was a trifle annoyed that his hook idea hadn't worked. So Stuart slipped into his old pants and prepared to go down the drain after the ring. He decided to carry the string along with him, leaving one end in charge of his father.

"When I jerk three times on the string, pull me up," he said. And while Mr. Little knelt in the tub, Stuart slid easily down the drain and was lost to view. In a minute or so, there came three quick jerks on the string, and Mr. Little carefully hauled it up. There, at the end, was Stuart, with the ring safely around his neck.

"Oh, my brave little son," said Mrs. Little proudly, as she kissed Stuart and thanked him.

"How was it down there?" asked Mr. Little, who was always curious to know about places he had never been to.

"It was all right," said Stuart.

But the truth was the drain had made him very slimy, and it was necessary for him to take a bath and sprinkle himself with a bit of his mother's violet water before he felt himself again. Everybody in the family thought he had been awfully good about the whole thing.

Stuart Little. Copyright © by E. White. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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