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Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family
     

Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family

5.0 7
by Lauren Kessler
 

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ISBN-10: 0870714171

ISBN-13: 9780870714177

Pub. Date: 08/12/2008

Publisher: Oregon State University Press

To celebrate Oregon's 150th birthday, the Oregon Library Association has chosen one book for all Oregonians to read: Stubborn Twig. Lauren Kessler's award-winning book, the selection for the statewide Oregon Reads program, is a classic story of immigrants making their way in a new land. It is a living work of social history that rings with the power of truth and the

Overview

To celebrate Oregon's 150th birthday, the Oregon Library Association has chosen one book for all Oregonians to read: Stubborn Twig. Lauren Kessler's award-winning book, the selection for the statewide Oregon Reads program, is a classic story of immigrants making their way in a new land. It is a living work of social history that rings with the power of truth and the drama of fiction, a moving saga about the challenges of becoming an American.

Masuo Yasui traveled from Japan across the other Oregon Trail-the one that spanned the Pacific Ocean-in 1903. Like most immigrants, he came with big dreams and empty pockets. Working on the railroads, in a cannery, and as a houseboy before settling in Hood River, Oregon, he opened a store, raised a large family, and became one of the area's most successful orchardists.

As Masuo broke the race barrier in the local business community, his American-born children broke it in school, scouts, and sports, excelling in most everything they tried. For the Yasuis' first-born son, the constraints and contradictions of being both Japanese and American led to tragedy. But his seven brothers and sisters prevailed, becoming doctors, lawyers, teachers, and farmers. It was a classic tale of the American dream come true-until December 7, 1941, changed their lives forever.

The Yasuis were among the 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry along the West Coast who were forced from their homes and sent to vast inland internment camps. Masuo was arrested as a spy and imprisoned for the rest of the war; his family was shamed and broken. Yet the Yasuis endured, as succeeding generations took up the challenge of finding their identity as Americans. Stubborn Twig istheir story-a story at once tragic and triumphant, one that bears eloquent witness to both the promise and the peril of America.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780870714177
Publisher:
Oregon State University Press
Publication date:
08/12/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
308
Sales rank:
478,486
Product dimensions:
6.06(w) x 10.88(h) x 0.67(d)

Table of Contents


Foreword   Governor Theodore R. Kulongski     ix
Preface     xiii
Acknowledgments     xvi
Issei: The First Generation
Spacious Dreams     3
Paradise     19
Roots Sunk Deep     35
The Yellow Scourge     53
Mat Yasui, Cottage Industry     67
Paradise Lost     89
Nisei: The Second Generation
A Shadow Across the Canvas     109
The Overachievers     137
Oriental Jailbird     153
A Viper Is a Viper     175
Behind Barbed Wire     189
Homecoming     211
Two Hundred Percent American     227
Sansei: The Third Generation
Willow Flat     247
The Past Is Prologue     263
Interview with Homer Yasui     279
Reading Group Questions     285
Sources     287
Index     299

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Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is well-researched, interesting, and educational. It is something everyone should read to get a better understanding of American history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
CherieOR More than 1 year ago
I first heard the book on MP3 through the library and was so impressed, I had to buy it in print. Astonishing historical account for Oregon residents. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in multi-cultural interests.
MaryGnu More than 1 year ago
Well done. I liked the author's following of one family. One family in the Hood River Valley. Doing so allowed an intimate look at the functioning of a multi-generational group its challenges and triumphs. My book club read this and it brought forward interesting conversations. The persons in my book club were mostly in grade school during WWII so have memories of the internment of the Japanese, memories of Asian children in the schools, memories of friendships changed forever as a result of the internments. One woman picked berries for Chop when she was a kid. In conclusion, this book is excellent on many levels.
DebbieOR More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. History was my major in college, so I am always drawn to these kinds of books. I also live in the Portland OR area, so it's doubly interesting to read. The subject matter is something you don't often study in school unless you take a class that is very focused on this time. It's eye-opening to know how people of Japanese ancestry were treated. I think it's also very good to know what did happen so that we can avoid such things in the future, especially during our current time with suspicion of people of Middle Eastern ancestry. This book is written more like a history book than a novel. It tells you the facts.
chasCV More than 1 year ago
A very well written book. Author spent a lot of time in research, interviewing all involved. Anyone who is interested in the internment camps and families who lived through this era of poor government judgment would like this reading.