Stuck with the Blooz

( 1 )

Overview

What do you do when you're feeling blue—especially when your mood takes the form of a drippy, oozy monster called the Blooz? Do you ignore it? Do you ask it lots of questions? Do you give it an ice-pop and hope it goes away? Through trial and error, the child in this story discovers that while it may not be easy, it's not impossible to shake the Blooz.   

With a read-aloud rhythm and whimsical illustrations, this debut picture book helps children ...

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Overview

What do you do when you're feeling blue—especially when your mood takes the form of a drippy, oozy monster called the Blooz? Do you ignore it? Do you ask it lots of questions? Do you give it an ice-pop and hope it goes away? Through trial and error, the child in this story discovers that while it may not be easy, it's not impossible to shake the Blooz.   

With a read-aloud rhythm and whimsical illustrations, this debut picture book helps children talk about emotions—and is perfect for young fans of friendly monsters.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When a “very big and very wet and very blue” monster shows up on a girl’s doorstep, she’s at a loss for what to do. The Blooz, who has a bulbous nose (and body) and wears a saggy 1920s-style swimsuit, doesn’t respond to threats, snacks, Band-Aids, or a nap—it just gets bigger and drippier. But things start looking up when the girl exercises her imagination (“We unmade my bed, made a hideout, and hid”), and makes Blooz join her outside for some silly play (“We collected only the leaves with holes in them”) and rambunctious biking. Positively beaming, the Blooz floats away. Debut author Levis has an impressively light touch—this subject matter can easily devolve into sappy cheerleading—and she gives readers room to feel the arc of the girl’s struggle. In digital spreads that evoke watercolors, Davis (Watch Your Tongue, Cecily Beasley) makes the Blooz and its despair feel both comic and formidable, so while the heroine’s triumph is never in doubt, it’s still a tribute to her sharp thinking. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Advocate Art. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"The process of understanding emotion, especially for young children, can be overwhelming and abstract—the Blooz just might be the perfect concrete visual to help everyone get through those cranky days."
Kirkus

"Debut author Levis has an impressively light touch."
Publishers Weekly

"Blooz may be a blob, and he may be uninvited, but he is actually kinda cute, which makes this a nonthreatening tool for discussing negative emotions with young children."
Booklist

"Children will identify with her feelings in this tale, and it will have value as a springboard for discussing sadness and how to work through it."
School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
One Sunday morning our young narrator senses the arrival of the Blooz, a creature "very big and very wet and very blue." She tries in vain to shut it out, but it dribbles and squeezes itself into her breakfast drinks, muddies her paints, even trickles into her clothes. She asks it what's wrong and tries to make it feel better; it's not hurt, or hungry, or sleepy. Retreating to her room and then outside, she tries many ways to cheer it up. Finally, while taking it on a bicycle ride, riding ever faster, she goes over a bump. The Blooz flies up into the air and is gone. "And when I looked around...I found the brightest, bluest day." The jacket prepares us for the odd adventure, as we see the perplexed narrator and the bottom of a dumpy blue creature with skinny legs. "What do you do when you're feeling blue?" is the question posed there. A wide-eyed upside down goldfish from inside the story is on one side of the cover; our heroine steps into the dripping from the Blooz on the back. Cheery flowered paper on the front end pages is being splashed with blue; but all is clear on the back pages. Davis uses digital technology with sketchily outlined characters filled in with watercolor-like tones, with few details of rooms or landscapes. Double pages are needed to contain the hulky Blooz, whose symbolism should make for interesting discussions. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—A little girl wakes up one weekend morning feeling out of sorts and knows the "Blooz"-big, drippy, lumpy, oozy, and violet blue-has come to visit her. She tries in vain to keep it out of her house-but it just keeps trickling its enormous wet self into her lemonade, chocolate milk, paints, and socks. "What's up, Blooz?" the child finally asks, trying to appease it with glitter Band-Aids, ice pops, and a soft blanket. Stymied and staring at each other, the twosome retreat to the girl's room, where their imaginations kick in with all sorts of fun play ideas. Eventually they head outside for a bike ride, but a bump on the road flips the Blooz high into the sky, where it disappears, leaving the youngster happily alone on "the brightest, bluest day." No adults figure in this allegorical story of a childhood funk, which the youngster bravely recognizes and, to her credit, resolves independently. Digitally painted, the whimsical cartoon illustrations gradually increase in color intensity as the little girl finds her way to a happier state of mind. Children will identify with her feelings in this tale, and it will have value as a springboard for discussing sadness and how to work through it.—Kathleen Finn, St. Francis Xavier School, Winooski, VT
Kirkus Reviews
In the imagination of one little girl, the "blues" take the shape of a very big, very wet and very blue bumbling monster. The Blooz isn't scary; it just drips and sloshes and oozes (as one might expect of personified gloom). The little girl tries to keep it away and hotly tells it, "You weren't invited." But the Blooz dribbles right into her chocolate milk and is there to stay. She tries all different tactics: ignoring it, yelling at it, asking it questions, even offering the last peach-raspberry ice pop in the box. But the Blooz just sits there, large and lumpy. Exasperated, the little girl sits and stares right back. Finally, in a very Buddhist approach, she accepts the sadness for what it is and simply spends a little time with it. That is often the only true way to set the Blooz free. First-time author Levis writes with a particularly refreshing innocence that affirms readers' feelings but also shows them that sadness does not have to be scary--or even a bad thing. Davis abets this with his portrayal of the Blooz as a vaguely Seuss-ian and wholly unthreatening big-nosed blob in an old-fashioned–looking, blue-striped romper. The process of understanding emotion, especially for young children, can be overwhelming and abstract--the Blooz just might be the perfect concrete visual to help everyone get through those cranky days. (Picture book. 4-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547745602
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 751,789
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

CARON LEVIS enjoys working with kids, using drama and writing to teach social, emotional, communication, and literacy skills. She received her MFA in Creative Writing from the New School University and lives in her hometown of New York City. Stuck with the Blooz is her first book.

www.caronlevis.com

Jon Davis worked in 3D animation before switching to children's book illustration full time. He is the illustrator of several picture books, including Stuck with the Blooz by Caron Levis. Small Blue and the Deep Dark Night is the first book which he both wrote and illustrated. Jon lives with his family in London. www.jonsmind.com

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    "Stuck with the Blooz"  by Caron Levis is an enchantin

    "Stuck with the Blooz"  by Caron Levis is an enchanting story with imaginative illustrations which allows the child, and the child in all of us, to acknowledge " Some days it's hard to shake the Blooz" 
    As the story unfolds, the child with thoughtful reflection and self motivation learns how to take control of the "Blooz".   ,
    A wonderful book to read and share with a young child.  It will bring happiness to all.

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