Student Brains, School Issues

Overview

Formerly a Sky Light publication.

Student Brains, School Issues: A Collection of Articles is packed with information on how the brain learns, the nature of intelligence, and the vital role that emerging technology plays in how students process information.

We are in the midst of the two most significant revolutions in the history of education: brain research and computer technology. Learn what researchers are...

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Overview

Formerly a Sky Light publication.

Student Brains, School Issues: A Collection of Articles is packed with information on how the brain learns, the nature of intelligence, and the vital role that emerging technology plays in how students process information.

We are in the midst of the two most significant revolutions in the history of education: brain research and computer technology. Learn what researchers are discovering about the biological aspects of learning and how this, along with growing technology, is changing the nature of the classroom. This resource, which helps you to understand and incorporate computer technology and the findings from brain research in teaching and learning, focuses on four significant areas:

  • The nature of the cognitive science revolution
  • The importance of emotion in cognition
  • The biological substrate of intelligence
  • The relationship between brains and computers in computational thought processes
Take advantage of this wealth of information on brain research. It will help you to make the commitment and to take the challenge to become a leader in the transformation of our schools and our profession.

Take advantage of this wealth of information on brain research. Student Brains, School Issues: A Collection of Articlesis packed with information on how the brain learns, the nature of intelligence, and the vital role that emerging technology plays in how students process information.
We are in the midst of the two most significant revolutions in the history of education: brain research and computer technology. Learn what researchers are discovering about the biological aspects of learning and how this, along with growing technology, is changing the nature of the classroom.
This resource helps you to understand and incorporate computer technology and the findings from brain research in teaching and learning. The articles focus on four significant areas: the nature of the cognitive science revolution, the importance of emotion in cognition, the biological substrate of intelligence, and the relationship between brains and computers in computational thought processes.
This book helps you to make the commitment and to take the challenge to become a leader in the transformation of our schools and our profession and to gain a new perspective of what it means to be and to teach a human being.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781575170466
  • Publisher: Corwin Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/1999
  • Pages: 184
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.42 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Sylwester is an Emeritus Professor of Education at the University of Oregon who focuses on the educational implications of new developments in science and technology. He has written 20 books and curricular programs and 200+ journal articles. His most recent books are The Adolescent Brain: Reaching for Autonomy (2007, Corwin Press) and How to Explain a Brain: An Educator’s Handbook of Brain Terms and Cognitive Processes (2005, Corwin Press). He received two Distinguished Achievement Awards from The Education Press Association of America for his syntheses of cognitive science research, published in Educational Leadership. He has made 1600+ conference and staff development presentations on educationally significant developments in brain/stress theory and research. Sylwester wrote a monthly column for the Internet journal, Brain Connection, throughout its 2000-2009 existence, and is now a regular contributor to the Information Age Education Newsletter (http://i-a-e.org/).

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Section 1: Education and the Current Cognitive Science Revolution
On Using Knowledge About Our Brain: A Conversation with Bob Sylwester
Smart Brains
Recommended Readings
Section 2: The Emergence and Importance of Emotion
On Emotional Intelligence: A Conversation with Daniel Goleman
How Emotions Affect Learning
The Neurobiology of Self-Esteem and Aggression
Can't Do Without Love
Recommended Readings
Section 3: Biological and Technological Perspectives on Intelligence
The First Seven...and the Eighth: A Conversation with Howard Gardner
What Does It Mean to Be Smart?
Bioelectronic Learning: The Effects of Electronic Media on a Developming Brain
Forecasts for Technology in Education
Recommended Readings
Section 4: New Perspectives on Computational Thought Processes
A Brain That Talks
Why Andy Couldn't Read
A Head for Numbers
New Research on the Brain: Implications for Instruction
Recommended Readings
Authors
Acknowledgments
Index

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