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Student's Guide to F. Scott Fitzgerald
     

Student's Guide to F. Scott Fitzgerald

by Eva Weisbrod
 
F. Scott Fitzgerald, chronicler of the "Jazz Age," is one of the finest writers in the history of American literature. As both a leading participant and an observer of the times he described, he captured the spirit of an era perhaps as no other writer, before or since, ever has. Today, Fitzgerald's novels, stories, and essays are nearly all recognized as American

Overview

F. Scott Fitzgerald, chronicler of the "Jazz Age," is one of the finest writers in the history of American literature. As both a leading participant and an observer of the times he described, he captured the spirit of an era perhaps as no other writer, before or since, ever has. Today, Fitzgerald's novels, stories, and essays are nearly all recognized as American classics. His novel The Great Gatsby is often described as the "Great American Novel."

In this Student's Guide to F. Scott Fitzgerald, the career of this literary giant is examined, offering accessible insight for young readers. Each work is placed in historical and biographical context, with special emphasis on Fitzgerald's curriculum-related works such as The Great Gatsby, Tender Is the Night, and The Beautiful and Damned, along with several of his short stories and other works.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The "Understanding Literature" series is a sort of upscale Cliff's Notes for middle and upper school students of literature. Sturdy library binding envelopes a smattering of photos, glossary, chronology, end notes and index. In between—as in Weisbrod's F. Scott Fitzgerald, is a combination of biography, synopses, and brief comments on critical reactions to most of Fitzgerald's works. The writing is geared to the introductory student and occasional sidebars discuss in simple terms pertinent topics such as Prohibition, or words like hedonism. It's a reasonable beginning point, but Weisbrod tends to oversimplify Fitzgerald's life—particularly his childhood—which she insists colored his life as a "poor boy." A look at his cosseted baby photos and the picture of his very proper upper middle-class St. Paul home sends an entirely different message. Fitzgerald was no "poor boy," rather a young man, and later adult, who chose to create his own myths—like Jay Gatsby—to suit his image. 2004, Enslow, Ages 11 up.
—Kathleen Karr
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 7-10-These volumes contain valuable information for students. Diorio outlines Hawthorne's life in New England, his influences, and his major themes. The Scarlet Letter, The House of the Seven Gables, The Marble Faun, and several short stories are discussed in terms of plot, character, themes, and literary devices. Literary terms and other words used in the text are briefly defined and the writing is clear and easy to understand. Weisbrod covers the Jazz Age and the development of Fitzgerald's earliest work, and provides critical information about his most important writings. This Side of Paradise, The Great Gatsby, The Beautiful and the Damned, Tender Is the Night, and some short stories are among the works discussed. Descriptions of his writing style, language, characters, themes, and literary legacy are included. Both books have average-quality, black-and-white photos and reproductions. Welcome additions to literature collections.-Pat Bender, The Shipley School, Bryn Mawr, PA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780766022027
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
02/28/2004
Series:
Understanding Literature Series
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.16(h) x 0.58(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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