Studies from Court and Cloister

Studies from Court and Cloister

by Jean Mary Stone
     
 

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A fascinating collection of studies about religion and politics during the later years of the Middle Ages. Includes essays on many topics, including the influence of Henry VIII, the Tower of London, the various English translations and illuminations of the Bible, and the Society of Jesus.See more details below

Overview

A fascinating collection of studies about religion and politics during the later years of the Middle Ages. Includes essays on many topics, including the influence of Henry VIII, the Tower of London, the various English translations and illuminations of the Bible, and the Society of Jesus.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781781667644
Publisher:
Andrews UK
Publication date:
06/19/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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VI GIORDANO BRUNO IN ENGLAND The revolt from Scholasticism in the sixteenth century, led by Erasmus of Rotterdam, John Colet, and other apostles of the new learning, reached farther, and was productive of other results than these had intended or anticipated. Erasmus was called an infidel by the friars, but he always stoutly protested his adherence to the Church of which the Pope was the head; and Colet has been considered by many as a herald of the Reformation, although he died a Catholic. Erasmus, by his own showing, was no infidel, and there are sufficient indications that Colet, even had his life been prolonged, would never have gone over to the enemy; but both had given cause for apprehension by opening doors to a profound dissatisfaction, to novel theories and extravagant systems, which many friends of Erasmus carried on to a denial of all revealed religion. In throwing discredit on the schoolmen, Erasmus had prepared the way for a contempt of Aristotle himself, and when the ex-friar Giordano Bruno of Nola appeared as a leader of revolt, distinct from Luther and Calvin, he found in Italy and France a small band of intellectual revolutionists clamouring for a philosophy that should emancipate them from the thraldrom of Christianity, and yet save them from the dishonourable name of atheists. They wished to be called deists ; not because they favouredany particular form or system of religion, but as a sign that they acknowledged, in some vague and undefined sense, a Supreme Being, and were content to follow the light and law of nature, rejecting revelation, and placing themselves in opposition to Christianity. Bruno gave them a philosophical system that was neither platonic norperipatetic, nor was it mystic, but a confused jumble of all three systems, and, accor...

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