The Study of Signed Languages: Essays in Honor of William C. Stokoe

The Study of Signed Languages: Essays in Honor of William C. Stokoe

by David F. Armstrong
     
 

The late William C. Stokoe changed the landscape of linguistic inquiry when, in the mid-1960s, he began to prove that signed languages, particularly American Sign Language, met all criteria to constitute genuine languages. At that time, most scholars rejected Stokoe's theories outright. But, in 1999, many of today's notable researchers assembled at a special

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Overview

The late William C. Stokoe changed the landscape of linguistic inquiry when, in the mid-1960s, he began to prove that signed languages, particularly American Sign Language, met all criteria to constitute genuine languages. At that time, most scholars rejected Stokoe's theories outright. But, in 1999, many of today's notable researchers assembled at a special conference in Stokoe's honor to explore the remarkable research that grew out of his originalinsights on American Sign Language. The Study of Signed Languages presents the fascinating findings from that conference.

Part 1, Historical Perspectives, begins with a description of the decline of sign language usage in the late 1800s. Past research on signed languages and their relationship to language origins theory follows, along with a consideration of modality and conflicting agendas for their study.

In Part 2, Language Origins, the first entry intrigues with the possibility that sign language could answer conundrums posed by Noam Chomsky's linguistic theories. The next essay considers how to build a better language model by citing continuity, ethology, and Stokoe's work as key elements. Stokoe's own research on the gestural theory of language origins is examined in the section's closing chapter.

Part 3, Diverse Populations, delineates the impact of sign language research on Black Deaf communities in America, on deaf education, on research into variation in sign language, and even on sign communication and the motor functioning of autistic children and others. In its wide-ranging, brilliant scholarship, The Study of Signed Language? demonstrates the enormous range of influence exercised by William C. Stokoe and serves as a fitting tribute to him and his work.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781563685101
Publisher:
Gallaudet University Press
Publication date:
02/15/2011
Edition description:
1st Edition
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

List of Contributors
Preface: William C. Stokoe and the Study of Signed Languages
Introduction: Bill Stokoe: An ASL Trailblazer1
Pt. 1Historical Perspectives
Introduction9
1The Curious Death of Sign Language Studies in the Nineteenth Century13
2Historical Observations on the Relationship Between Research on Sign Languages and Language Origins Theory35
3Modality Effects and Conflicting Agendas53
Pt. 2Language Origins
Introduction85
4Does Sign Language Solve the Chomsky Problem?89
5Continuity, Ethology, and Stokoe: How to Build a Better Language Model100
6William C. Stokoe and the Gestural Theory of Language Origins118
Pt. 3Diverse Populations
Introduction133
7The Impact of Variation Research on Deaf Communities137
8The Impact of Sign Language Research on Black Deaf Communities in America161
9Bilingualism and the Impact of Sign Language Research on Deaf Education172
10Sign Communication Training and Motor Functioning in Children with Autistic Disorder and in Other Populations190
11Gesture and the Nature of Language in Infancy: The Role of Gesture as a Transitional Device En Route to Two-Word Speech213
Concluding Thoughts: The Future of American Sign Language247
Index263

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