The Stuff of Life

The Stuff of Life

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by Karen Karbo
     
 

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The Oregon Book Awards presented the Sarah Winnemucca Award for Creative Nonfiction to Karen Karbo for The Stuff of Life.
When Karen Karbos father, a charming, taciturn Clint Eastwood type who lives in a triple-wide in the Nevada desert, is diagnosed with lung cancer, his only daughter rises to the challenge of caring for him. Neither of them is exactly

Overview

The Oregon Book Awards presented the Sarah Winnemucca Award for Creative Nonfiction to Karen Karbo for The Stuff of Life.
When Karen Karbos father, a charming, taciturn Clint Eastwood type who lives in a triple-wide in the Nevada desert, is diagnosed with lung cancer, his only daughter rises to the challenge of caring for him. Neither of them is exactly cut out for the job. As Dick Karbos disease progresses, Karen finds herself sometimes the responsible adult, sometimes a stubborn teenager all over again. But in the end, what father and daughter discover more than anything is the love and the toughness that makes them alike.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596918252
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
12/11/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
File size:
774 KB

Meet the Author

Karen Karbo is the author of three novels and the nonfiction book Generation Ex: Tales from the Second Wives Club. Her writing has appeared in Vogue, Esquire, Entertainment Weekly, The New Republic, and the New York Times, among other publications. She lives in Oregon.

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Stuff of Life: A Daughter's Memoir 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are facing the reality of a parent with a terminal disease (other than life), Karen Karbo's 'The Stuff of Life' will be hard but necessary. Like the reality of going through your parents' last chapter of life. I felt compelled to read it as I am currently in this situation with my own father. Karen's brave sharing of her highs and lows helped me feel compassion for myself -- helped me not judge myself too harshly for similar thoughts and feelings. I truly appreciate her sharing the messiness of life through death and to know there is someone else who is phobic around 'nausea'. Her humor makes this hard reality more dear, real and human and I thank her for helping me during my turn. It helps to have another know when we are in the midst of learning on the curve.