Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture

Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture

by Margreta de Grazia
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521455898

ISBN-13: 9780521455893

Pub. Date: 03/28/1996

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This collection of essays brings together leading scholars of the early modern period, and offers a new focus on the literature and culture of the Renaissance. Traditionally, Renaissance studies has concentrated on the human subject; the essays collected here bring objects—purses, clothes, tapestries, houses, maps, feathers, tools, skulls—back into view.

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Overview

This collection of essays brings together leading scholars of the early modern period, and offers a new focus on the literature and culture of the Renaissance. Traditionally, Renaissance studies has concentrated on the human subject; the essays collected here bring objects—purses, clothes, tapestries, houses, maps, feathers, tools, skulls—back into view. Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture puts things back into relation with people, eliciting not only new critical readings of key texts, but also new configurations of Renaissance culture.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521455893
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
03/28/1996
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture Series, #8
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
420
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.94(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction Margreta de Grazia, Maureen Quilligan and Peter Stallybrass; Part I. Priority of Objects: 1. The ideology of superfluous things: King Lear as period piece Margreta de Grazia; 2. Rude mechanicals Patricia Parker; 3. Spenser's domestic domain: poetry property and the Early Modern subject Louis A. Montrose; Part II. Materialisations: 4. Gendering the Crown Stephen Orgel; 5. The unauthored 1539 volume in which is printed the Hecatomphile, The Flowers of French Poetry and Other Soothing Things Nancy J. Vickers; 6. Dematerialisations: textile and textual properties in Ovid, Sandys, and Spenser Ann Rosalind Jones; Part III. Appropriations: 7. Freedom service and the trade in slaves: the problem of labour in Paradise Lost Maureen Quilligan; 8. Feathers and flies: Aphra Behn and the seventeenth-century trade in exotica Margaret W. Ferguson; 9. Unlearning the Aztec Cantares (Preliminaries to a postcolonial history) Gary Tomlinson; Part IV. Fetishisms: 10. Worn worlds: clothes and identity on the Renaissance stage Peter Stallybrass; 11. The Countess of Pembroke's literal translation Jonathan Goldberg; 12. Remnants of the sacred in early modern England Stephen Greenblatt; Part V. Objections: 13. The insincerity of women Marjorie Garber; 14. Desire is death Jonathan Dollimore; Index.

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