Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$45.98
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $27.69
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 48%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $27.69   
  • New (2) from $50.36   
  • Used (4) from $27.67   

Overview

This collection of essays brings together leading scholars of the early modern period, and offers a new focus on the literature and culture of the Renaissance. Traditionally, Renaissance studies has concentrated on the human subject; the essays collected here bring objects—purses, clothes, tapestries, houses, maps, feathers, tools, skulls—back into view. Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture puts things back into relation with people, eliciting not only new critical readings of key texts, but also new configurations of Renaissance culture.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This year's award for a must-read collection goes to Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture, with its knock-them-dead title. Confronted by such a work and its truly remarkable phalanx of academic stars, what reviewer could resist...they are as intelligent as they are well known." Studies in English Literature

"This focus on rethinking the relationship between subject and object is certainly worthwhile and novel. And the essays that follow include some dazzling explorations of this theme." Jvotsna G. Singh, Shakespeare Quarterly

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction Margreta de Grazia, Maureen Quilligan and Peter Stallybrass; Part I. Priority of Objects: 1. The ideology of superfluous things: King Lear as period piece Margreta de Grazia; 2. Rude mechanicals Patricia Parker; 3. Spenser's domestic domain: poetry property and the Early Modern subject Louis A. Montrose; Part II. Materialisations: 4. Gendering the Crown Stephen Orgel; 5. The unauthored 1539 volume in which is printed the Hecatomphile, The Flowers of French Poetry and Other Soothing Things Nancy J. Vickers; 6. Dematerialisations: textile and textual properties in Ovid, Sandys, and Spenser Ann Rosalind Jones; Part III. Appropriations: 7. Freedom service and the trade in slaves: the problem of labour in Paradise Lost Maureen Quilligan; 8. Feathers and flies: Aphra Behn and the seventeenth-century trade in exotica Margaret W. Ferguson; 9. Unlearning the Aztec Cantares (Preliminaries to a postcolonial history) Gary Tomlinson; Part IV. Fetishisms: 10. Worn worlds: clothes and identity on the Renaissance stage Peter Stallybrass; 11. The Countess of Pembroke's literal translation Jonathan Goldberg; 12. Remnants of the sacred in early modern England Stephen Greenblatt; Part V. Objections: 13. The insincerity of women Marjorie Garber; 14. Desire is death Jonathan Dollimore; Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)