Subject and Strategy: A Writer's Reader / Edition 12

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Overview

No other rhetorical reader offers this much accessible writing instruction at such an affordable price. With engaging readings, innovative classroom exercises, and effective writing assignments, Subject & Strategy guides students in selecting, practicing, and mastering writing strategies that suit their subject and purpose. More than 90 readings usefully model how the rhetorical patterns work alone and together in successful writing. The praised “Writers on Writing” chapter motivates students to see themselves as writers, and thorough coverage of reading and writing, research, documentation, and grammar provides a foundation for success in the course. Now with multimodal e-Page readings that take advantage of what the Web can do, the book does more than ever to help your students read and write effectively.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312612733
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 12/17/2010
  • Edition description: Twelfth Edition
  • Edition number: 12
  • Pages: 784
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

ALFRED ROSA and PAUL ESCHHOLZ are professors emeriti of English at the University of Vermont. They have directed statewide writing programs and conducted numerous workshops throughout the country on writing and the teaching of writing. Rosa and Eschholz have collaborated on a number of best-selling texts for Bedford/St. Martin's, including Models for Writers, Tenth Edition (2010); Outlooks and Insights: A Reader for College Writers, Fourth Edition (1995); with Virginia Clark, Language Awareness, Tenth Edition (2008); and, with Virginia Clark and Beth Simon, Language: Readings in Language and Culture, Seventh Edition (2007).

 

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Table of Contents

*New to this edition

1 Reading

Developing an Effective Reading Process

  Step 1: Prepare Yourself to Read the Selection

  Step 2: Read the Selection

  Step 3: Reread the Selection

  Step 4: Annotate the Selection

     An Example: Annotating Cherokee Paul McDonald’s "A View from the Bridge"

     *Cherokee Paul McDonald, A View from the Bridge

  Step 5: Analyze and Evaluate the Selection

The Reading Process in Action: Thomas L. Friedman's "My Favorite Teacher"

About the Photographs and Visual Texts in This Book

The Reading-Writing Connection

  Reading as a Writer

2 Writing

Developing an Effective Writing Process

  Step 1: Understand Your Assignment

    Finding a Subject Area and Focusing on a Topic

    Determine Your Purpose

    Know Your Audience

  Step 2: Gather Ideas and Formulate a Thesis

    Brainstorming

     Clustering

     Researching

     Rehearsing Ideas

     Formulating a Thesis

  Step 3: Organize and Write Your First Draft

     Determining a Strategy for Developing Your Essay

     Choosing Strategies across the Disciplines

     Writing Your First Draft

     Academic Writing

  Step 4: Revise Your Essay

     Taking Advantage of Peer Critiques

     Revising the Larger Elements of Your Essay

    Writing Beginnings and Endings

     Revising the Smaller Elements of Your Essay

  Step 5: Edit and Proofread Your Essay

A Student Essay in Progress

  Step 1: Keith's Assignment

  Step 2: Keith's Ideas

  Step 3: Keith's First Draft

  Step 4: Keith's Revised Essay

  Step 5: Keith's Edited Essay

    Keith Eldred, Secular Mantras (student essay)

3 Writers on Writing

  Russell Baker, Discovering the Power of My Words

  Anne Lamott, Shitty First Drafts

  Linda Flower, Writing for an Audience

  William Zinsser, Simplicity

  *Susan Orlean, On Voice

  Stephen King, Reading to Write

  e-Pages *Jonathan Beer, Writing Process Animation

4 Narration

What is Narration?

Narration in Written Texts

Using Narration as a Writing Strategy

Using Narration across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Narration as a Writing Strategy

  Laura LaPierre, Why Are You Here? (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Narration as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Narration Essay

    Select a Topic That Has Meaning for You

     Determine Your Point and Purpose

    Establish a Context

     Choose the Most Appropriate Point of View

     Gather Details That "Show, Don't Tell"

  Organizing Your Narration Essay

    Identify the Sequence of Events in Your Narrative

  Writing Your Narration Essay

     Keep Your Verb Tense Consistent

     Use Narrative Time for Emphasis

     Use Transitional Words to Clarify Narrative Sequence

     Use Dialogue to Bring Your Narrative to Life

  Revising and Editing Your Narration Essay

     Share Your Draft with Others

     Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

Malcolm X, Coming to an Awareness of Language

*Elisa Mala, Crime Family

David P. Bardeen, Not Close Enough for Comfort

Barry Winston, Stranger Than True

*Jennifer 8. Lee, For Immigrant Family, No Easy Journey

e-Pages *Lt. Dan Choi, Don't Tell, Martha!

Writing Suggestions for Narration

5 Description

What is Description?

Description in Written Texts

Using Description as a Writing Strategy

Using Description across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Description as a Writing Strategy

  James C. Tassé, Trailcheck (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Description as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Description Essay

    Determine a Purpose

     Use Description in the Service of an Idea

  Organizing Your Description Essay

    Create a Dominant Impression

    Organize Your Details to Create a Vivid Picture

  Revising and Editing Your Description Essay

     Show, Don't Tell: Use Specific Nouns and Action Verbs

    Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Description

*Jeannette Walls, A Woman on the Street

Pat Mora, Remembering Lobo

Robert Ramirez, The Barrio

*E. B. White, Once More to the Lake

Maya Angelou, Sister Flowers

e-Pages *Vocativ, Tower of David

Writing Suggestions for Description

6 Illustration

What is Illustration?

Illustration in Written Texts

Using Illustration as a Writing Strategy

Using Illustration across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Illustration as a Writing Strategy

  Paula Kersch, Weight Management: More than a Matter of Good Looks (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Illustration as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Illustration Essay

     Focus on Your Thesis or Main Idea

     Gather More Examples Than You Can Use

     Choose Relevant Examples

     Be Sure Your Examples Are Representative

  Organizing Your Illustration Essay

     Sequence Your Examples Logically

     Use Transitions

  Revising and Editing Your Illustration Essay

     Share Your Work with Others

     Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Illustration

Natalie Goldberg, Be Specific

*Kal Raustiala and Chris Sprigman, In Praise of Copycats

Mitch Albom, If You Had One Day with Someone Who's Gone

*Firoozeh Dumas, Hot Dogs & Wild Geese

Deborah Tannen, How to Give Orders Like a Man

e-Pages *XPLANE, Did You Know?

Writing Suggestions for Illustration

7 Process Analysis

What is Process Analysis?

Process Analysis in Written Texts

Using Process Analysis as a Writing Strategy

  Directional Process Analysis

  Informational Process Analysis

  Evaluative Process Analysis

Using Process Analysis across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Process Analysis as a Writing Strategy

  Shoshanna Lew, How (Not) to Be Selected for Jury Duty (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Process Analysis as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Process Analysis Essay

     Know the Process You Are Writing About

     Have a Clear Purpose

  Organizing Your Process Analysis Essay

     Organize the Process into Steps

     Use Transitions to Link the Steps

  Revising and Editing Your Process Analysis Essay

     Energize Your Writing: Use the Active Voice and Strong Action Verbs

     Use Consistent Verb Tense

     Share Your Drafts with Others

     Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Process Analysis

Mortimer Adler, How to Mark a Book

Tiffany O'Callaghan, Young Love

Michael Pollan, Eating Industrial Meat

*Robert Krulwich, Are Butterflies Two Different Animals in One? The Death and Resurrection Theory

Nikki Giovanni, Campus Racism 101

e-Pages *Sustainable America, How to Compost in Your Apartment

Writing Suggestions for Process Analysis

8 Comparison and Contrast

What are Comparison and Contrast?

Comparison and Contrast in Written Texts

Using Comparison and Contrast as a Writing Strategy

Using Comparison and Contrast across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Comparison and Contrast as a Writing Strategy

  Barbara Bowman, Guns and Cameras (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Comparison and Contrast as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Comparison and Contrast Essay

    Compare Subjects from the Same Class

     Determine Your Purpose, and Focus on it

     Formulate a Thesis Statement

     Choose the Points of Comparison

  Organizing and Writing Your Comparison and Contrast Essay

     Choose an Organizational Pattern That Fits Your Material

     Use Parallel Constructions for Emphasis

  Revising and Editing Your Comparison and Contrast Essay

     Share Your Drafts with Others

    Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Comparison and Contrast

Suzanne Britt, Neat People vs. Sloppy People

*Mark Bittman, Which Diet Works?

Bharati Mukherjee, Two Ways to Belong in America

*Andrew Vachss, Difference Between ‘Sick’ and ‘Evil’

Bruce Catton, Grant and Lee: A Study in Contrasts

e-Pages *Devin Hahn, One Small Step for Man

Writing Suggestions for Comparison and Contrast

9 Division and Classification

What are Division and Classification?

Division and Classification in Written Texts

Using Division and Classification as a Writing Strategy

Using Division and Classification across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Division and Classification as a Writing Strategy

  *Gerald Dromos, NYM’s Talk (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Division and Classification as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Division and Classification Essay

    Determine Your Purpose, and Focus on It

    Formulate a Thesis Statement

  Organizing and Writing Your Division and Classification Essay

    Establish Valid Categories

    State Your Conclusion

  Revising and Editing Your Division and Classification Essay

    Listen to What Your Classmates Have to Say

    Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Division and Classification

Rosalind Wiseman, The Queen Bee and Her Court

*Dahlia Lithwick, Chaos Theory: A Unified Theory of Muppet Types

Judith Viorst, The Truth about Lying

Martin Luther King Jr., The Ways of Meeting Oppression

*Maria Konnikova, 'Beam Us Up, Mr. Scott!': Why Misquotations Catch On

e-Pages *Flowtown, Social Media Demographics: Who's Using Which Sites?

Writing Suggestions for Division and Classification

10 Definition

What is Definition?

Definition in Written Texts

Using Definition as a Writing Strategy

Using Definition across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Definition as a Writing Strategy

  Howard Solomon, Jr., Best Friends (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Definition as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Definition Essay

     Determine Your Purpose

     Formulate a Thesis Statement

    Consider Your Audience

     Choose a Type of Definition That Fits Your Subject

  Organizing and Writing Your Definition Essay

     Develop an Organizational Plan

     Use Other Rhetorical Strategies to Support Your Definition

  Revising and Editing Your Definition Essay

    Share Your Drafts with Others

    Select Words That Accurately Denote and Connote What You Want to Say

     Use Specific and Concrete Words

    Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Definition

Jo Goodwin Parker, What Is Poverty?

G. Anthony Gorry, Steal This MP3 File: What Is Theft?

Deborah M. Roffman, What Does 'Boys Will Be Boys' Really Mean?

Sojourner Truth, Ain't I a Woman?

*Walter Isaacson, The Genius of Jobs

e-Pages *GOOD, Not Your Parents' American Dream

Writing Suggestions for Definition

11 Cause and Effect Analysis

What is Cause and Effect Analysis?

Cause and Effect Analysis in Written Texts

Using Cause and Effect Analysis as a Writing Strategy

Using Cause and Effect Analysis across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Cause and Effect Analysis as a Writing Strategy

  Kevin Cunningham, Gentrification (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Cause and Effect Analysis as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Cause and Effect Analysis

     Establish Your Focus

     Determine Your Purpose

     Formulate a Thesis Statement

  Organizing and Writing Your Cause and Effect Analysis

     Avoid Oversimplification and Errors of Logic

    Use Other Rhetorical Strategies

  Revising and Editing Your Cause and Effect Analysis

     Select Words That Strike a Balanced Tone

     Share Your Draft with Others

    Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Cause and Effect Analysis

Jon Katz, How Boys Become Men

*Carrie Arnold, Is Anorexia a Cultural Disease?

Andrew Sullivan, iPod World: The End of Society?

Carl M. Cannon, The Real Computer Virus

Michael Jonas, The Downside of Diversity

e-Pages *Casey Neistat, Texting While Walking

Writing Suggestions for Cause and Effect Analysis

12 Argumentation

What is Argumentation?

Argument in Written Texts

Using Argumentation as a Writing Strategy

Using Argumentation across the Disciplines

Sample Student Essay Using Argumentation as a Writing Strategy

  *Kate Suarez, Celebrity Obsession: Healthy Behavior? (student essay)

Suggestions for Using Argumentation as a Writing Strategy

  Planning Your Argumentation Essay

     Determine Your Thesis or Proposition

     Consider Your Audience

     Gather Supporting Evidence

  Organizing and Writing Your Argumentation Essay

    Choose an Organizational Pattern

     Consider Refutations to Your Argument

     Use Other Rhetorical Strategies

    Conclude Forcefully

  Revising and Editing Your Argumentation Essay

    Avoid Faulty Reasoning

    Share Your Draft with Others

     Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Argumentation

Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence

Richard Lederer, The Case for Short Words

Martin Luther King Jr., I Have a Dream

Steven Pinker, In Defense of Dangerous Ideas

*Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, Two Cheers for Sweatshops

e-Pages *Slavery Footprint, How Many Slaves Work For You?

    *Argument Cluster: Sports and Doping

    *Ian Steadman, How Sports Would Be Better with Doping

    *Reid Forgrave, No Easy Answer for PEDs, Youth

    *Jonathan Vaughters, How to Get Doping Out of Sports

    e-Pages *Peter Singer, Is Doping Wrong?

Writing Suggestions for Argumentation

    *Argument Cluster: Technology and Privacy

    *Joel Stein, Data Mining: How Companies Now Know Everything About You

    *Massimo Calabresi, The Phone Knows All

    *Rafi Ron, Man Versus Machine

    e-Pages *Jim Harper, It’s Modern Trade: Web Users Get as Much as They Give

Writing Suggestions for Argumentation

    *Argument Cluster: College: Is It Worth the Cost?

    *Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney, Where Is the Best Place to Invest $102,000—In Stocks, Bonds, or a College Degree?

    *Maureen Tkacik, The Student Loan Crisis that Can’t Be Gotten Rid Of

    *Teresa Sullivan, Four Kinds of Value in Higher Education

    e-Pages *Lamar Alexander, The Three-Year Solution

13 Combining Strategies

What Does it Mean to Combine Strategies?

Combining Strategies in Written Texts

Sample Student Essay Using a Combination of Strategies

  Tara E. Ketch, Kids, You Can't Read That Book! (student essay)

Suggestions for Using a Combination of Strategies in an Essay

  Planning Your Combined Strategies Essay

    Determine Your Purpose

     Formulate a Thesis Statement

  Organizing Your Combined Strategies Essay

     Determine Your Dominant Strategy

     Determine Your Supporting Strategies 

  Revising and Editing Your Combined Strategies Essay

    Listen to What Your Classmates Have to Say

     Question Your Own Work While Revising and Editing

  Questions for Revising and Editing: Combining Strategies

Lars Eighner, On Dumpster Diving

*Perri Klass, How Babies Sort Out Language

George Orwell, Shooting an Elephant

Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal

e-Pages *Halftone, Why is the Sky Blue? 

Writing Suggestions for Combining Strategies

14 Writing with Sources

What Does It Mean to Write with Sources?

Writing with Sources

  Summarizing

  Paraphrasing

  Using Direct Quotation

  Integrating Borrowed Material into Your Text

Avoiding Plagiarism

  Using Quotation Marks for Language Borrowed Directly

  Using Your Own Words and Word Order When Summarizing and Paraphrasing

Sample Student Essay Using Library and Internet Sources

  *Courtney Sypher, From Computer Cruelty to Campus Crime: Cyberbullying at College (student essay)

  Lily Huang, The Case of the Disappearing Rabbit

  *Jane S. Shaw, Nature in the Suburbs

  Jake Jamieson, The English-Only Movement: Can America Proscribe Language With a Clear Conscience? (student essay)

e-Pages *Megan Garber, The Curator's Guide to the Galaxy

15 A Brief Guide to Researching and Documenting Essays

Establishing a Realistic Schedule

Finding and Using Sources

  Conducting Keyword Searches  

  Using Subject Directories to Define and Develop Your Research Topic

Evaluating Your Sources

Analyzing Your Sources

Developing a Working Bibliography

Taking Notes

Documenting Sources

  In-Text Citations

     Periodical Print Publications: Journals, Magazines, and Newspapers

    Nonperiodical Print Publications: Books, Brochures, and Pamphlets

  Web Publications

    Online Scholarly Journals

     Periodical Publications in an Online Database

    Nonperiodical Web Publications

  Additional Common Sources

16 Editing for Grammar, Punctuation, and Sentence Style

Run-Ons: Fused Sentences and Comma Splices

Sentence Fragments

Comma Faults

Subject-Verb Agreement

Unclear Pronoun References

Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement

Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers

Faulty Parallelism

Weak Nouns and Verbs

Shifts in Verb Tense, Mood, and Voice

Wordiness

Sentence Variety

*Appendix: Thematic Writing Assignments

Glossary of Rhetorical Terms

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