Subject Matters: Classroom Activity in Math and Social Studies

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $35.00   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$35.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(146)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Chicago, IL 1988 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 196 p. Audience: General/trade. Hardcover in dust jacket, Fine/Fine Condition (Brand new ... book! ) HM. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Naperville, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

To achieve quality education in American schools, we need a better understanding of the way classroom instruction works. Susan S. Stodolsky addresses this need with her pioneering analysis of the interrelations between forms of instruction, levels of student involvement, and subject matter. Her intensive observation of fifth-grade math and social studies classes reveals that subject matter, a variable overlooked in recent research, has a profound effect on instructional practice.

Stodolsky presents a challenge to educational research. She shows that classroom activities are coherent actions shaped by the instructional context—especially what is taught. Stodolsky contradicts the received view of both teaching and learning as uniform and consistent. Individual teachers arrange instruction very differently, depending on what they are teaching, and students respond to instruction very differently, depending on the structure and demands of the lesson.

The instructional forms used in math classes, a "basic" subject, and social studies classes, an "enrichment" subject, differ even when the same teacher conducts both classes. Social studies classes show more diversity in activities, while math classes are very similar to one another. Greater variety is found in social studies within a given teacher's class and when different teachers' classes are compared. Nevertheless, in the classrooms Stodolsky studied, the range of instructional arrangements is very constricted.

Challenging the "back to basics" movement, Stodolsky's study indicates that, regardless of subject matter, students are more responsive to instruction that requires a higher degree of intellectual complexity and performance, to learning situations that involve them in interaction with their peers, and to active modes of learning. Stodolsky also argues that students develop ideas about how to learn a school subject, such as math, by participating in particular activities tied to instruction in the subject. These conceptions about learning are unplanned but enduring and significant consequences of schooling.

The Subject Matters has important implications for instructional practice and the training, education, and supervision of teachers. Here is a new way of understanding the dynamics of teaching and learning that will transform how we think about schools and how we study them.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226775111
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/1988
  • Pages: 214
  • Product dimensions: 5.83 (w) x 8.79 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan S. Stodolsky is associate professor of education and the behavioral sciences at the University of Chicago.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Tables List of Figures Preface
1. Subject Matter, Classroom Activity, and Student Involvement Introduction Subject Matter and Instruction Mathematics Programs Social Studies Programs The Activity Structure and Activity Segments Segment Properties Student Involvement Background on Student Involvement
2. Research Methods Selection of Schools, Classrooms, and Students Data Collection Proccedures Observations of Classroom Activity and Students Data-Coding Procedures Identifying Segments Coding Segment Properties Coding Student Involvement Data Analysis Interdependence in the Data Basic Descriptive Information on the Observational Data
3. Subject Matter Differences in Classroom Activity Lesson Topics Instructional Activity Segment Feature Measures Instructional Formats Student Behavior Patterns Materials Pacing and Expected Social Interaction Options Location and Time of Day Feedback Cognitive Level Teacher Role and Simultaneous Segments Segment Patterns Program Variants Individual Teachers Summary
4. Beyond Subject Matter: Intellectual Activity and Student Reponse How Learning Environments Are Organized Cognitive Level and Pacing Student Involvement Cognitive Level, Pacing, and Student Involvement Factual Teacher-Paced Segments Preparatory Segments Checking-Work Segments Recitation Segments Discussion The Responsive Student Intellectual Activity
5. Discussion and Implications Generalizability Origins of Different Activity Structures Community Influences Students Tests—Accountability Textbooks Teachers Content and Topics The Meaning of Learning Routes to Learning Routes to Learning Student Attitudes Implications and Reflections The Existential Fallacy and Educational Research Implications Appendix A. Sample Instruments Activity Structure Observation Form Individual Student Observation Form Appendix B. Coding Definitions and Examples Instructional Format Pacing Cognitive Level Student Behavior Teacher Leadership Role Feedback Expected Student Interaction Task Options Options When Done Student Location Student Involvement Appendix C. Tables Table C.1 Number of Instructional Segments, Involvement Segments, Minutes, and Class Periods Observed in Each Class Table C. 2 Mean Durations of Segments by Segment Features Notes References Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)