Substance of Things Hoped for: A Memoir of African-American Faith by Samuel DeWitt Proctor, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Substance of Things Hoped for: A Memoir of African-American Faith

Substance of Things Hoped for: A Memoir of African-American Faith

by Samuel DeWitt Proctor
     
 

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The Pastor Emeritus of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem reflects on faith's role in his own life and in the African-American experience. Dr. Proctor chronicles his family's journey--from his grandmother's slavery through the monumental victories of the NAACP to his own involvement in the King Oasis and through subsequent presidential eras--to show the common

Overview

The Pastor Emeritus of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem reflects on faith's role in his own life and in the African-American experience. Dr. Proctor chronicles his family's journey--from his grandmother's slavery through the monumental victories of the NAACP to his own involvement in the King Oasis and through subsequent presidential eras--to show the common thread in the lives of millions of African Americans: pure enduring faith.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Proctor-pastor emeritus of Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, an ex-professor and college administrator and former associate director of the Peace Corps-has lived a life sustained by faith and clear-eyed optimism about the possibilities and problems faced by American blacks. His warm, lucid memoir covers so much ground that it seems skimpy in places. However, his anecdotes resonate: they relate to the backbone he gained from family, church and black society in the segregated South; his role as mentor to Martin Luther King Jr. and many others; and his conviction, after trips to Africa and other foreign lands, that black Americans are inherently American. Though a man of tradition, he calls for the black church to liberalize its attitudes toward women. He has strong policy suggestions to reclaim lost youth: reinvest in teaching; have black churches link up to gain clout; establish a Peace Corps-like National Youth Academy at deactivated military bases to educate youngsters whom schools haven't helped. That would cost much less than prisons, he warns. Literary Guild alternate; author tour. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Proctor, the grandson of a slave, became the president of two black colleges, a top administrator in the Peace Corps and at Rutgers University, and pastor of Harlem's huge Abyssinian Baptist Church. He reminisces here about his tireless lifetime struggle to better the lot of blacks through education and religion. He devotes a major portion of this work debunking both racist stereotypes held by whites and what he views as futile separatist agendas among blacks. He outlines an ambitious plan, grounded in education, religion, and traditional values, to rescue blacks from poverty, ignorance, and despair. Proctor's work is a passionate and eloquent call to action, founded on a lifetime of fulfilling achievement. Highly recommended for undergraduate and public libraries.-Richard S. Watts, San Bernadino Cty. Lib., Cal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780817013257
Publisher:
Judson Press
Publication date:
07/28/1999
Pages:
243
Sales rank:
797,352
Product dimensions:
6.01(w) x 8.95(h) x 0.73(d)

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