Succeeding with the Booch and OMT Methods: A Practical Approach

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This new book by the leaders in object-oriented technology introduces two of the best known OO analysis and design methods and illustrates their application using the popular object modeling tool, Rational Rose 3.0. The methods are the Object Modeling Technique, with key development by Rational Fellow, Jim Rumbaugh, and the Booch Method, developed by Rational's chief scientist, Grady Booch. Succeeding with the Booch and OMT Methods draws from the extensive OO experience of the Lockheed Martin Advanced Concepts ...
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Overview

This new book by the leaders in object-oriented technology introduces two of the best known OO analysis and design methods and illustrates their application using the popular object modeling tool, Rational Rose 3.0. The methods are the Object Modeling Technique, with key development by Rational Fellow, Jim Rumbaugh, and the Booch Method, developed by Rational's chief scientist, Grady Booch. Succeeding with the Booch and OMT Methods draws from the extensive OO experience of the Lockheed Martin Advanced Concepts Center and Rational Software Corporation and is designed to provide the reader with clear instructions on how to implement these methods using the Rational Rose 3.0 tool. With equal coverage of each method provided, the book reflects the format of the Rational Rose 3.0 tool. This book will be useful for managers and application builders who want concrete examples of how to apply OO methods to real-world systems using an incremental, iterative approach.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Introduces two well-known OO analysis and design methods, the Object Modeling Technique and the Booch Method, and illustrates their application using Rational Rose, a popular object modeling tool. Discusses project management, identifying key artifacts, and systematic application of reuse, in a straightforward layout with many subheadings, plus chapter summaries and glossaries. For computer professionals and students familiar with basic software engineering concepts and at least one of the methods. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805322798
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley Professional
  • Publication date: 7/26/1996
  • Series: Object Oriented Software Engineering Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Goals

This book provides practical guidance on the construction of object-oriented systems using the Booch and OMT methods of software development. Its specific goals are
  • To provide a sound understanding of the fundamental principles of the Booch and OMT methods
  • To give examples of the usage of the key elements of the notations
  • To teach the application of the Booch and OMT methods by using a sample problem domain

Audience

This book is written for the computer professional as well as for the student. It is suitable for use in professional seminars and individual study as well as in undergraduate and graduate courses. It shows how to
  • Use the Booch and OMT methods effectively to solve real problems
  • Develop a system from requirements to detailed design by using an object-oriented approach

Because this is a case study, the reader should have a general understanding of or be in the process of learning the approach, the specialized terms, and the notation of the Booch and/or OMT methods. This book also assumes some familiarity with basic software engineering concepts.

Approach

This book takes a practical approach to teaching the Booch and OMT methods. It uses a case study to show the analysis and design of an application. We chose a course registration system for a university as the problem domain because it is easily understood and not specific to any field of computer science. The reader can concentrate on the specifics of modeling the domain in the Booch and OMT methods, rather than investing time in understanding an unfamiliar problem domain.The problem is treated seriously enough to give the readerpractical experience with most of the steps of the Booch and OMT methods and the feeling of solving a real problem, without being so realistic that the reader is bogged down in details. Thus many interesting and perhaps necessary requirements, considerations, and constraints were put aside to produce a simplified, yet useful case study fitting the scope of this book. With the goal of usefulness in mind, the exercises have been crafted to make the methods clear to a practitioner's eye.

The methods are described as a series of sequential steps. This approach gives the new user a framework for developing object-oriented applications and provides advanced techniques for more experienced users. As users become fluent in the methods, they will be able to move back and forth through the steps, and often combine several steps, until the desired result is achieved.

For additional details on the evolving Booch and OMT methods, or on applying them to your application, you should consider the training and mentoring services offered by both the Lockheed Martin Advanced Concepts Center (ACC) and Rational Software Corporation. The ACC may be contacted at Lockheed Martin Advanced Concepts Center, 640 Freedom Business Center, King of Prussia, PA 19406, 1-800-438-7246. You may send e-mail to the ACC at solutions@acc.vf.mmc.com. Rational Software Corporation may be contacted at 2800 San Tomas Expressway, Santa Clara, CA 95051, 1-800-767-3237. You may send e-mail to Rational at product_info@rational.com.

Any software development method is best supported by a tool, and this book makes use of the tool Rational Rose 3.0. Each step in either method includes a description of how to use Rational Rose 3.0 to complete the step. This information is presented in separate text boxes provided as an aid to users of Rational Rose 3.0. To obtain a copy of Rational Rose 3.0, contact either of the above companies.

Structure

The book is divided into three sections followed by a set of appendices. The first section contains case-study background information that is applicable to both the Booch and OMT methods. The second section contains chapters devoted to the Booch method, and the third section covers the OMT method.

Case-study background

The first chapter discusses information related to the course registration system case study that is used throughout the book.

The Booch Method

Overview

Chapter 2 establishes the principles of the Booch method. It summarizes the steps of the method, and discusses the deliverables of each step.

Conceptualization

Chapter 3 discusses possible sources of information about the requirements of a system and shows the creation of a context diagram. It also describes the problem domain of the course registration system used throughout the book.

Analysis

Chapters 4 through 9 describe the steps of analysis in detail. Chapter 4 discusses how to find, define, and document key classes of the domain. Chapter 5 shows how to define the structure and behavior of the system by looking at the use cases of the system. Chapter 6 illustrates the definition of relationships between classes in the system. Chapter 7 discusses the discovery of generalized classes, or superclasses, and of specialized classes, or subclasses. Chapter 8 illustrates the use of Harel state transition diagrams for classes with significant dynamic behavior. Finally, Chapter 9 presents ways to validate an analysis model.

Design

Chapters 10 through 12 describe how an analysis model matures into a design model. Chapter 10 shows how to organize the design into a structured architecture. Chapter 11 details the steps involved in iteration planning. Chapter 12 discusses the use of commercial class libraries during development.

Evolution

Chapters 13 through 15 describe the evolution of a system under development using an iterative and incremental approach. Chapter 13 discusses building an iteration. Chapter 14 illustrates the steps necessary to build the next iteration. Finally, Chapter 15 details team development procedures.

The OMT Method

Overview

Chapter 16 establishes the principles of the OMT method. It summarizes the steps of the method, the models, and the deliverables of each step.

Conceptualization

Chapter 17 explains how OMT can help you understand the need for a system and to systematically obtain the outline and form of new systems. Showing how to create context diagrams and high-level use cases, this chapter introduces the problem domain of the course registration system and the operation concepts of the solution approach used throughout the book.

Domain Analysis

Domain analysis, the systematic exploration of the world, is examined in Chapters 18 through 21. The core modeling approaches of OMT, the class diagram (Chapter 18), associations (Chapter 19), operations and attributes (Chapter 20), and state diagrams (Chapter 21), are also covered.

Application Analysis

In Chapters 22 through 25, we further analyze the specific application. Application classes (Chapter 22), such as surrogates, controllers, and views are created, and use cases (Chapter 23) are further explored to capture the specific user-visible requirements of the system. Chapter 24 discusses the discovery of generalized classes, or superclasses, and of specialized classes, or subclasses. In Chapter 25, the functional model is introduced to formally capture lower-level behavior.Chapter 26 discusses techniques to test the analysis.

System Design

System architecture and policy are captured using techniques described in Chapter 27.

Object Design

The details of object design are captured using diagrams such as the object interaction diagrams, as shown in Chapter 28. Chapter 29 discusses the use of commercial class libraries during development. As object design progresses, the details of the objects are specified. Chapter 30 gives an overview of some of the considerations of object design and begins to discuss implementation.

Implementation

After the discussion in Chapter 30 of implementation, Chapter 31 illustrates the steps necessary to build the next iteration using round-trip engineering. Finally, Chapter 32 details team development procedures.

Appendix A

Appendix A gives a detailed definition of the Booch notation.

Appendix B

Appendix B gives a detailed definition of the OMT notation.

Appendix C

Appendix C shows a sample of the C++ code generated by the Rational Rose 3.0 tool for one class in the course registration system.

Using this book

You can read straight through this manual to obtain the fundamental concepts of the Booch and OMT methods and a sense of how the object-oriented software engineering process works. Using the book along with Rational Rose 3.0 will allow you to work some of the examples and develop a more detailed understanding of the methods.

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the following people for their contributions to the content, style, presentation, and writing of this book. Special thanks to Loren Archer, Alex Baran, Grady Booch, Elizabeth Bufo, Mike Duffy, Frank DuPont, Jim Ford, Adam Frankel, Burton Goldfield, Kim Heisman, Peter Luckey, Phil Magrogan, Sue Mickel, Paul Mims, Sylvia Pacheco, Jim Rumbaugh, Jim Schardt, Tom Schultz, Bill Snizek, Mark Sutton, Kurt TeKolste, Chuck von Flotow, and Daryl Winters for all their inputs.



0805322795P04062001

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Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Case Study Background 1
Ch. 2 Overview of the Booch Method 9
Ch. 3 Conceptualization: Defining the Problem 21
Ch. 4 Analysis: Finding Classes 31
Ch. 5 Analysis: Attributes and Operations 43
Ch. 6 Analysis: Defining Relationships 57
Ch. 7 Analysis: Inheritance 71
Ch. 8 Analysis: Object Behavior 79
Ch. 9 Analysis: Consistency Checking and Model Validation 89
Ch. 10 Design: Defining an Architecture 95
Ch. 11 Design: Iteration Planning 111
Ch. 12 Design: Use of Commercial Class Libraries 117
Ch. 13 Evolution: Building an Architectural Release 127
Ch. 14 Evolution: Building the Next Release 145
Ch. 15 Evolution: Team Development with Rational Rose 151
Ch. 16 Overview of the OMT Method 157
Ch. 17 Conceptualization: Defining the Need 171
Ch. 18 Domain Analysis: Finding Classes 183
Ch. 19 Domain Analysis: Capturing Associations 191
Ch. 20 Domain Analysis: Attributes and Operations 203
Ch. 21 Domain Analysis: State Modeling 217
Ch. 22 Application Analysis 231
Ch. 23 Application Use-Case Analysis 243
Ch. 24 Generalization 251
Ch. 25 Analysis: Functional Modeling 259
Ch. 26 Testing 265
Ch. 27 System Design 273
Ch. 28 Object Design 287
Ch. 29 Design: Use of Commercial Class Libraries 297
Ch. 30 Object Design: Designing Details 307
Ch. 31 Evolution: Building the Next Release 317
Ch. 32 Evolution: Team Development with Rational Rose 323
Appendix A Booch Notation 329
Appendix B OMT Notation 349
Appendix C Sample Code Generated by Rational Rose 361
Index 371
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Preface

PREFACE:

Goals

This book provides practical guidance on the construction of object-oriented systems using the Booch and OMT methods of software development. Its specific goals are
  • To provide a sound understanding of the fundamental principles of the Booch and OMT methods
  • To give examples of the usage of the key elements of the notations
  • To teach the application of the Booch and OMT methods by using a sample problem domain

Audience

This book is written for the computer professional as well as for the student. It is suitable for use in professional seminars and individual study as well as in undergraduate and graduate courses. It shows how to
  • Use the Booch and OMT methods effectively to solve real problems
  • Develop a system from requirements to detailed design by using an object-oriented approach

Because this is a case study, the reader should have a general understanding of or be in the process of learning the approach, the specialized terms, and the notation of the Booch and/or OMT methods. This book also assumes some familiarity with basic software engineering concepts.

Approach

This book takes a practical approach to teaching the Booch and OMT methods. It uses a case study to show the analysis and design of an application. We chose a course registration system for a university as the problem domain because it is easily understood and not specific to any field of computer science. The reader can concentrate on the specifics of modeling the domain in the Booch and OMT methods, rather than investing time in understanding an unfamiliar problem domain.The problem is treated seriously enough to give thereaderpractical experience with most of the steps of the Booch and OMT methods and the feeling of solving a real problem, without being so realistic that the reader is bogged down in details. Thus many interesting and perhaps necessary requirements, considerations, and constraints were put aside to produce a simplified, yet useful case study fitting the scope of this book. With the goal of usefulness in mind, the exercises have been crafted to make the methods clear to a practitioner's eye.

The methods are described as a series of sequential steps. This approach gives the new user a framework for developing object-oriented applications and provides advanced techniques for more experienced users. As users become fluent in the methods, they will be able to move back and forth through the steps, and often combine several steps, until the desired result is achieved.

For additional details on the evolving Booch and OMT methods, or on applying them to your application, you should consider the training and mentoring services offered by both the Lockheed Martin Advanced Concepts Center (ACC) and Rational Software Corporation. The ACC may be contacted at Lockheed Martin Advanced Concepts Center, 640 Freedom Business Center, King of Prussia, PA 19406, 1-800-438-7246. You may send e-mail to the ACC at solutions@acc.vf.mmc.com. Rational Software Corporation may be contacted at 2800 San Tomas Expressway, Santa Clara, CA 95051, 1-800-767-3237. You may send e-mail to Rational at product_info@rational.com.

Any software development method is best supported by a tool, and this book makes use of the tool Rational Rose 3.0. Each step in either method includes a description of how to use Rational Rose 3.0 to complete the step. This information is presented in separate text boxes provided as an aid to users of Rational Rose 3.0. To obtain a copy of Rational Rose 3.0, contact either of the above companies.

Structure

The book is divided into three sections followed by a set of appendices. The first section contains case-study background information that is applicable to both the Booch and OMT methods. The second section contains chapters devoted to the Booch method, and the third section covers the OMT method.

Case-study background

The first chapter discusses information related to the course registration system case study that is used throughout the book.

The Booch Method

Overview

Chapter 2 establishes the principles of the Booch method. It summarizes the steps of the method, and discusses the deliverables of each step.

Conceptualization

Chapter 3 discusses possible sources of information about the requirements of a system and shows the creation of a context diagram. It also describes the problem domain of the course registration system used throughout the book.

Analysis

Chapters 4 through 9 describe the steps of analysis in detail. Chapter 4 discusses how to find, define, and document key classes of the domain. Chapter 5 shows how to define the structure and behavior of the system by looking at the use cases of the system. Chapter 6 illustrates the definition of relationships between classes in the system. Chapter 7 discusses the discovery of generalized classes, or superclasses, and of specialized classes, or subclasses. Chapter 8 illustrates the use of Harel state transition diagrams for classes with significant dynamic behavior. Finally, Chapter 9 presents ways to validate an analysis model.

Design

Chapters 10 through 12 describe how an analysis model matures into a design model. Chapter 10 shows how to organize the design into a structured architecture. Chapter 11 details the steps involved in iteration planning. Chapter 12 discusses the use of commercial class libraries during development.

Evolution

Chapters 13 through 15 describe the evolution of a system under development using an iterative and incremental approach. Chapter 13 discusses building an iteration. Chapter 14 illustrates the steps necessary to build the next iteration. Finally, Chapter 15 details team development procedures.

The OMT Method

Overview

Chapter 16 establishes the principles of the OMT method. It summarizes the steps of the method, the models, and the deliverables of each step.

Conceptualization

Chapter 17 explains how OMT can help you understand the need for a system and to systematically obtain the outline and form of new systems. Showing how to create context diagrams and high-level use cases, this chapter introduces the problem domain of the course registration system and the operation concepts of the solution approach used throughout the book.

Domain Analysis

Domain analysis, the systematic exploration of the world, is examined in Chapters 18 through 21. The core modeling approaches of OMT, the class diagram (Chapter 18), associations (Chapter 19), operations and attributes (Chapter 20), and state diagrams (Chapter 21), are also covered.

Application Analysis

In Chapters 22 through 25, we further analyze the specific application. Application classes (Chapter 22), such as surrogates, controllers, and views are created, and use cases (Chapter 23) are further explored to capture the specific user-visible requirements of the system. Chapter 24 discusses the discovery of generalized classes, or superclasses, and of specialized classes, or subclasses. In Chapter 25, the functional model is introduced to formally capture lower-level behavior.Chapter 26 discusses techniques to test the analysis.

System Design

System architecture and policy are captured using techniques described in Chapter 27.

Object Design

The details of object design are captured using diagrams such as the object interaction diagrams, as shown in Chapter 28. Chapter 29 discusses the use of commercial class libraries during development. As object design progresses, the details of the objects are specified. Chapter 30 gives an overview of some of the considerations of object design and begins to discuss implementation.

Implementation

After the discussion in Chapter 30 of implementation, Chapter 31 illustrates the steps necessary to build the next iteration using round-trip engineering. Finally, Chapter 32 details team development procedures.

Appendix A

Appendix A gives a detailed definition of the Booch notation.

Appendix B

Appendix B gives a detailed definition of the OMT notation.

Appendix C

Appendix C shows a sample of the C++ code generated by the Rational Rose 3.0 tool for one class in the course registration system.

Using this book

You can read straight through this manual to obtain the fundamental concepts of the Booch and OMT methods and a sense of how the object-oriented software engineering process works. Using the book along with Rational Rose 3.0 will allow you to work some of the examples and develop a more detailed understanding of the methods.

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the following people for their contributions to the content, style, presentation, and writing of this book. Special thanks to Loren Archer, Alex Baran, Grady Booch, Elizabeth Bufo, Mike Duffy, Frank DuPont, Jim Ford, Adam Frankel, Burton Goldfield, Kim Heisman, Peter Luckey, Phil Magrogan, Sue Mickel, Paul Mims, Sylvia Pacheco, Jim Rumbaugh, Jim Schardt, Tom Schultz, Bill Snizek, Mark Sutton, Kurt TeKolste, Chuck von Flotow, and Daryl Winters for all their inputs.



0805322795P04062001

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