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Successful Classroom Management: Real-World, Time-Tested Techniques for the Most Important Skill Set Every Teacher Needs
     

Successful Classroom Management: Real-World, Time-Tested Techniques for the Most Important Skill Set Every Teacher Needs

4.5 12
by Richard Eyster, Christine Martin
 

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Lead, Inspire, and Change Your Students' Lives

Each year, tens of thousands of new teachers head out for their first teaching job, ready to fulfill a lifetime dream. However, most teachers have nothing to prepare them for or support them on one of the most important parts of their job: how to effectively run a classroom and handle the

Overview

Lead, Inspire, and Change Your Students' Lives

Each year, tens of thousands of new teachers head out for their first teaching job, ready to fulfill a lifetime dream. However, most teachers have nothing to prepare them for or support them on one of the most important parts of their job: how to effectively run a classroom and handle the students.

Successful Classroom Management is the first book to give you the skills you need to manage a classroom effectively. Richard H. Eyster and Christine Martin present the lessons that have made them the most sought-after seminar trainers on the topic, addressing:

Handling Classroom Problems
Troubleshooting Issues
Enforcing Discipline
Inspiring Students
Creating an Engaging Classroom Atmosphere

Filled with expert advice, stories and tips from teachers, and spot-on techniques, this is your new essential handbook that will help you not only survive in the classroom, but also live your dream and give your students the full gifts that come from a great education.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
""While the book is geared toward novice teachers, veteran teachers would benefit from the refreshing advice that reminds all educators what effective teaching comprises."" - ForeWord

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402240126
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
07/01/2010
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
381,323
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

From the Introduction

There are brief encounters, small moments that forever change one's life. I was in San Francisco ages ago, attending just another conference among many. The keynote speaker had just finished his address, and I rose with the rest of the audience to leave. Halfway up the aisle, in the heart of that milling, moving crowd, I stopped abruptly and turned. I had the distinct feeling that someone was watching me.

From far across the ballroom, a young woman was staring intently in my direction. I had no idea who she was. I checked behind me to see if I had mistaken the direction of her gaze, but there was no one behind me. And the mischief in her smile only deepened.

Before I knew it, she was only six feet away. She stopped before me then, her hands folded behind her, waiting for me to give up, but suddenly, I had her. With a suddenness that shocked and delighted me, I caught sight of a nineyear- old child gazing impishly from the eyes of the young woman before me. I burst into a laughing grin and reached out to embrace her. It was Jennifer Longley.

A dozen years before, I had taught Jennifer as a third grader. I had never seen her again-until now.

She still had a light spray of freckles across her upturned nose and the same devilish glint in her eyes-although obviously much had changed over the years. As we spoke, she began to fill in the blanks of that intervening stretch. Her mother had remarried and had moved to Maine. Her older sister, whom I had also taught, had taken a job with a magazine in New York. And Jennifer had taken a job in California, working through her first year of teaching, serving out an interim year for a teacher on maternity leave.

Our conversation quickly filled the minutes before the next series of workshops. We were headed in different directions, but before we broke away from each other, we agreed to meet for lunch.

I was very excited to have run into Jennifer. Beyond the simple pleasure of such a reunion, I felt a deep, resonant joy that someone as wonderfully bright and good-hearted as Jennifer had looked at the myriad opportunities before her and had chosen to teach. She had been a generous child, with a capacity for reaching out to classmates who struggled. Hundreds of students would come to be touched by her spirit. Many would be forever changed by what she brought to her classroom each day. The teaching profession is enriched every time a Jennifer Longley gives up the chance to achieve fame and fortune to take on the education of the young.

But when we met for lunch, things changed. We seated ourselves at a big, glassy café and began to catch up. She was teaching high school English. It was "fine." It was going "okay." We talked about the books she and her students were reading. I said that it must have been tough taking on a one-year assignment so new to the profession. She nodded, looking down and away. She didn't immediately surface from the nod. Her head remained bowed for too long. When she looked up at last, her eyes were brimming with tears.

She began speaking of the kids, good kids she couldn't really begin to control. She said she even knew how much some of them-all of them maybe-wanted her to be strong enough and sure-handed enough to control them, to keep them on course, but there was this group of boys...her voice trailed away then.

After a moment, she had the courage to meet my eyes and continue talking. Just the week before, she had missed a day because of an illness. The very next day, when she returned, the class was more chaotic than it ever was before. And one of the girls who had really liked her and had been rooting for her all along came up to her at the end of class. With a scalding look, she confronted Jennifer and hissed, "Even the sub could control us better than you can." And at that confession, right there in the noisy, crowded clatter of the restaurant, Jennifer Longley began to cry.

We spoke for a time. I tried to console her. I wished that there was something I could have said, something I could have done or offered to ease her pain. I wished that I knew what to tell her. I felt helpless in my compassion and care. After a while, we rose to go our separate ways. I gave her a parting hug. A soft light had begun to return to her eyes, not so much of hope but of the simple relief of having shared such a deep and secret grief. I never saw Jennifer again, though I thought of her countless times in the days that followed.

Several years later, I went to a reunion at the school where I had taught her and saw a number of her classmates. Several of them had been in touch with Jennifer in the interval. She was now doing "something in marketing." That had been her one and only year in education. We had lost her. Generations of students who would have had her as a teacher, learning English, decency, an enthusiasm for literature, and their own creative expression, would never know what they had missed.

Jennifer Longley had had a great deal to give, but she wasn't able to last. She hadn't had time to learn the survival skills of classroom management. One quiet June afternoon in a school emptying for the summer, she had packed her books and left, never to return. In so doing, she had left more than just a school behind. She had left education, and perhaps her own self-image, self-esteem, and aspirations were forever diminished.

Meet the Author

Richard H. Eyster is Head of School at The Summit Montessori School in Framingham, Massachusetts. He graduated from the University of Michigan and received his Masters in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Christine Martin is currently Department Chair, Learning Skills Department at Packer, where she directs the New Faculty Mentoring Program.

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Successful Classroom Management: Real-World, Time-Tested Techniques for the Most Important Skill Set Every Teacher Needs 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
melandinka More than 1 year ago
This book should be in every school library, if not in every teacher's library. It is full of practical advice on everything from lesson planning to seating arrangements to classroom demeanor to teacher/student and teacher/supervisor relationships. The information is well-organized, comprehensive, and engagingly presented. In the first months of this school year I have continually referred back to the book and have always found answers to questions or reminders about things I may have forgotten. Eyster and Martin are a constant inspiration to me to find ways to be a better teacher. Highly recommended!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rich Eyster and Christine Martin draw on extensive experience as teachers and observers of classrooms to produce a book that is at once an appreciation of the complexity of teaching and an accessible and engaging analysis of its components-and most usefully, a way of understanding and managing effectively these components. As a resource for an individual teacher or as the basis of continuing professional development for a faculty group, their work is invaluable. Geoff Pierson, former public school superintendent and independent school head
NatalieSchwartz More than 1 year ago
"Successful Classroom Management" is a comprehensive, insightful and inspirational survival guide for teachers. It covers everything from preparing for the school year to dealing with bullying to forging relationships with administrators. It's packed with practical techniques for addressing the multitude of challenges teachers face. The book also provides teachers with proven methods for engaging and motivating students. "Successful Classroom Management" will embolden new teachers and foster the professional development of veteran teachers. Natalie Schwartz Author, "The Teacher Chronicles: Confronting the Demands of Students, Parents, Administrators and Society"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Richard H. Eyster and Christine Martin have fooled us! They have crafted an extraordinary tome for all ages and types of teachers, full of wit, wisdom and personal experiences that toy with the innocuous title. This is a book that many of us who have experienced first hand this wonderful profession wanted to write after gaining a modicum of experience but never found time. Thank goodness Eyster and Martin found the time to share this gathering of evidence that by developing learnable skills the classroom can be an opportunity to learn and grow for both teacher, especially the new educator, and the student. A great primer for those entering the classroom and a powerful review for all of us hardened by the classroom years. Jerry Millhon,Former School Principal and Mentor to Young Educators
Kate_G More than 1 year ago
I had this book recommended to me as a teacher starting out... I'm so glad that I did! It had a lot of advice and insights that would have never occurred to me, and it allowed me to move into my new role with a sense of preparadeness, authority, and even confidence. A clear and comprehensive guide-- I highly recommend it to teachers young and old.
AlanArbesfeld More than 1 year ago
I think this book is terrific! The writing style is clear, persuasive, humorous, anecdotal, and very well-organized. The structure and lay-out make it easy to read, and I think it will be a tremendous asset for all teachers, not just rookies. Certainly new teachers stand to learn a lot from the insights and suggestions presented, but veterans can pick up a few helpful pointers as well. I recently had something happen with one of my students that seemed to come right from the book's pages! I particularly enjoyed the emphasis on the importance of praise, and the highlighted section on avoiding sarcasm; those of us with a sarcastic sense of humor still have to stop ourselves every now and then! This book should be required reading for all teachers!
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