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Successful Social Networking in Public Libraries
     

Successful Social Networking in Public Libraries

by Walt Crawford
 
"Most commentaries to date on library use of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have focused on a handful of well-funded public libraries with high-profile employees. Now Crawford's
Successful Social Networking in Public Libraries fills in the rest of the picture, offering for the first time an in-depth look at how a large variety of public libraries are

Overview

"Most commentaries to date on library use of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have focused on a handful of well-funded public libraries with high-profile employees. Now Crawford's
Successful Social Networking in Public Libraries fills in the rest of the picture, offering for the first time an in-depth look at how a large variety of public libraries are using social networks. Examining more than 6,000 libraries across the US, Crawford
◗◗ Analyzes social network usage by libraries of different sizes and funding levels, showing how many of them are active and effective in quite different ways
◗◗ Offers many examples that will help other libraries establish or refine their own social networking activities
◗◗ Presents several key questions that libraries should ask themselves, such as "Who do we want to reach?" and "What's the best way to interact with communities?"
◗◗ Gives libraries guidelines to set social networking goals and conduct ongoing evaluation
◗◗ Includes illuminating comments from numerous librarians on the front lines of communication"

Editorial Reviews

VOYA, February 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 6) - Geri Diorio
Crawford set out in early 2011 to discover how prevalent social media use is among public libraries and whether or not it is successful. He states that success in this venture does not look like success elsewhere. Huge numbers of Facebook “likes” and Twitter “followers” are not his benchmarks. Rather, he writes: “...public libraries are not businesses. They’re community institutions, and effectiveness must be measured against the needs and desires of the community.” He encourages libraries to look carefully at their social media postings and note, for example, if they are getting more donations to book sales, or a slight increase at programs. Those small gains may be enough to call your library’s social media presence a success. Each library is encouraged to define success on its own terms. That being said, Crawford acknowledges that most libraries’ social networking practices could be better, and he offers suggestions for conducting a social media audit on your library, as well as ideas for libraries to make better use of their Facebook and Twitter accounts. For readers who like to chew on data, there are many charts and tables. There are also samples of Facebook and Twitter posts from libraries across the country. These serve both to explain the ideas Crawford puts forth, and to give examples of good (and bad) ways to use social media. While a printed book on social networking is bound to be out-of-date almost as soon as it is published, a fact the author acknowledges, this may still be a useful reference tool for smaller libraries looking for easy-to-implement social media guidance. Reviewer: Geri Diorio; Ages adult professional.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780838911679
Publisher:
ALA Editions
Publication date:
09/28/2013
Pages:
167
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.38(d)

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