Sugar Pie and Jelly Roll: Sweets from a Southern Kitchen [NOOK Book]

Overview

Simple Pleasures of Family - and Dessert!

We were a pride of cousins. On occasions when we all had gathered from various corners of the South, my grandmother's house would echo with the cacophony of thirteen grandchildren. Once we took tow of Aunt Bett's babies sledding with us in the woods. We found a hill that provided the most exciting sled ride in my memory.. By dusk, ...

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Sugar Pie and Jelly Roll: Sweets from a Southern Kitchen

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Overview

Simple Pleasures of Family - and Dessert!

We were a pride of cousins. On occasions when we all had gathered from various corners of the South, my grandmother's house would echo with the cacophony of thirteen grandchildren. Once we took tow of Aunt Bett's babies sledding with us in the woods. We found a hill that provided the most exciting sled ride in my memory.. By dusk, exhilarated, wet, and cold, we trudged home. A warm fire and Burnt-Sugar Cake welcomed us back.



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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This charming little book offers 60 recipes for favorite Southern treats, such as Opera Creams and Burnt-Sugar Cake, illustrated with the author's delightful watercolors. The text is forthright, informative, and often amusing: "The problem with chess pies is that despite the sublime pleasure they deliver, they are ugly as sin--so don't present them as le grande finale" (she's right, but it's reassuring to have someone say so), or, " sickly marshmallows sandwiched between undistinguished chocolate wafers--[do] not a moon pie make. This [one] is a dreamy mocha cream." A good companion to James Villas's excellent My Mother's Southern Desserts, this is recommended for most baking collections. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616202880
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 6/10/2000
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Robbin Gourley is the author of Cakewalk, a collection of cake recipes published by Doubleday. Her illustrations have appeared in the New York Times and in numerous books. Born in North Carolina, where her grandmother taught her to bake, she lives with her husband and children in New York.
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Read an Excerpt

At age five, I received a diminutive tin refrigerator, a tiny electric stove that really baked, and miniature baking sheets and muffin tins from Santa Claus. Packaged mixes that needed only water and a stir were arranged beside my small kitchen. My obsession with desserts began that Southern Christmas day, and I had not a particle of doubt about it.

Introduction

Southerners have made sugar their business since Colonial times. But that only partially explains why my relatives consider themselves experts when it comes to dessert. Our ancestors had big farm kitchens, stations for more than one cook or baker, and many hungry mouths to feed. Dessert had always been an essential part of every meal; a pleasurable awakening for the palate after a heartening repast. Dessert satisfied the soul after bolstering the body and helped to supply the needed calories to carry on the hard work in the fields. It even made the afternoon's work look brighter.

In the land of Dixie, personalities can be downright sugary. The favorite nickname in my family is "sug," but others include "honey," "sweet pea," "toots" (pronounced tuutz), and "cookie." I like to think that words are drawled just because they sound sweeter. And in my family, a person's attachment to a certain sweet is a part of them like the way they wear their hat or overuse their favorite expression. My grandfather always had a hankering for cherry pudding; my mother adores all things chocolate. My sister Pam prefers lemon anything, while for my father, it's maple pecan. Uncle L.A., the beekeeper, loves persimmon pudding, and Aunt Sue always has a batch of nut candy on hand.

Where I come from, dessert is not only served after dinner. It can be breakfast, lunch, or dinner. I remember at one opulent family feast Aunt Bett pronouncing, "Tonight, I'm having dessert first."

And on a long-ago snowy December morning, after rising at daybreak and trudging through the woods to find the perfect Christmas tree and carrying it back home, my Dad and I helped ourselves to a very large slice of homemade Christmas Orange Cake for breakfast. We were happy all day.

I have seen desserts similar to my Southern favorites in the cases of fancy bakeries in New York. These smart marketers know that a good idea never grows old, it just needs repackaging. Their presentations are lavish: a round chocolate torte embellished with a fleur-de-lis of confectioners' sugar looks just like my warm chocolate cake dusted with sugar through a child's handmade snowflake pattern. The tea cakes wrapped in transparent paper and tied with hemp in Monsieur Bouley's patisserie are the same as my Lemon Kisses wrapped and tied with a handsome ribbon snipped from my kitchen drawer. I challenge even Mr. DeLuca to compare Muzz's Lemon Chess Pie to his Tarte Citron!

These tried and improved-upon recipes are from the honorable tradition of Southern baking, which borrows liberally from African, English, and French cookery. My hope is that these desserts will make happy memories in some other lives as well. A thoughtfully prepared and beautifully presented dessert brings a group together like bees to honey.

*****

Chocolate Chess Pie

Redolent of winter gatherings. When more than one kind of dessert is offered, this pie pleases the chocolate lovers.

8 servings

1/2 cup butter

Two 1-ounce squares unsweetened chocolate

1 cup firmly packed brown sugar

1/2 cup sugar

2 eggs, slightly beaten

1 teaspoon all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

One 9-inch unbaked pie shell

Preheat oven to 325oF.

Melt butter and chocolate in small saucepan over low heat. In a medium bowl, combine sugars, eggs, flour, milk, and vanilla, stirring well. Gradually add chocolate mixture, stirring constantly. Pour into pie shell and bake for 40 to 45 minutes. Let cool slightly before eating, or serve warm with whipped cream or Aunt Leecie's Custard Sauce if you must gild the lily.

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Table of Contents

1 PIES, CRISPS & CRUMBLES:

PIE SHELL

BUTTERMILK PIE

CHESS PIE

CHOCOLATE CHESS PIE

MUZZ'S LEMON CHESS PIE

PEACE PIE

BRAMBLE CRUMBLE

APPLE CRISP

FRIED FRUIT PIES

COCONUT CUSTARD PIE

PUMPKIN CHIFFON PIE

SHOOFLY PIE

LEMON MERINGUE PIE

MOON PIE

29 PUDDINGS & CUSTARDS:

MOM'S CHERRY PUDDING

WILD PERSIMMON PUDDING

RASPBERRY SUMMER PUDDING

NOVEMBER PUDDING

APRICOT BREAD PUDDING

CHOCOLATE PUDDING

KAY BENNETT'S DEEP-DISH SWEET POTATO PUDDING

PEARS IN NIGHTSHIRTS

47 CANDY:

PEANUT BRITTLE

CARMELS

DIVINITY

MOTHER'S FUDGE

CHOCOLATE-COVERED PEANUT BUTTER BONBONS

CANDIED FRUIT PEELS DIPPED IN CHOCOLATE

PRALINES

PULLED MINTS

SIMPLE BUTTER MINTS

MISS TRIXIE'S CANDIED POPCORN

OPERA CREAMS

65 COOKIES & BARS:

CHESS CHEWIES

ORANGE BLOSSOMS

PAM'S FROSTY DATE BALLS

GUMDROP COOKIES

MERINGUE SURPRISES

PECAN DROPS

LIBBY ROBBINS'S SCOTCHIES

MRS. WHITMORE'S COOKIES

LEMON KISSES

79 FAVORITE CAKES:

FIG CAKE

JELLY ROLL

BURNT-SUGAR CAKE WITH BURNT-SUGAR FROSTING

CHRISTMAS ORANGE CAKE

SUGAR-CRUST POUND CAKE WITH SHERRY SAUCE

WARM CHOCOLATE CAKE

PAM'S PERSIMMON-APPLE CAKE

CREAM PUFFS

101 CHILLED & SPIRITED DESSERTS:

PEACH ICE CREAM

SNOW CREAM

FROZEN FRUIT COMPOTE

AMBROSIA

WINE JELLY

POACHED PEACHES WITH WHOLE PEPPERCORNS

FIGS IN SPICED WINE

SYLLABUB

EMBELLISHMENTS:

RASPBERRY SAUCE

BOURBON SAUCE

HOT FUDGE SAUCE

REAL WHIPPED CREAM

AUNT LEECIE'S CUSTARD SAUCE

NORMAN'S NOG













































































































































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