Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:II: Book 3: Providence Part II / Edition 1

Summa Contra Gentiles, 3:II: Book 3: Providence Part II / Edition 1

by St. Thomas Aquinas
     
 

ISBN-10: 0268016887

ISBN-13: 9780268016883

Pub. Date: 01/01/1975

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press


The Summa Contra Gentiles is not merely the only complete summary of Christian doctrine that St. Thomas has written, but also a creative and even revolutionary work of Christian apologetics composed at the precise moment when Christian thought needed to be intellectually creative in order to master and assimilate the intelligence and wisdom of the Greeks

Overview


The Summa Contra Gentiles is not merely the only complete summary of Christian doctrine that St. Thomas has written, but also a creative and even revolutionary work of Christian apologetics composed at the precise moment when Christian thought needed to be intellectually creative in order to master and assimilate the intelligence and wisdom of the Greeks and the Arabs. In the Summa, Aquinas works to save and purify the thought of the Greeks and the Arabs in the higher light of Christian Revelation, confident that all that had been rational in the ancient philosophers and their followers would become more rational within Christianity.

This exposition and defense of divine truth has two main parts: the consideration of that truth that faith professes and reason investigates, and the consideration of the truth that faith professes and reason is not competent to investigate. The exposition of truths accessible to natural reason occupies Aquinas in the first three books of the Summa. His method is to bring forward demonstrative and probable arguments, some of which are drawn from the philosophers, to convince the skeptic. In the fourth book of the Summa St. Thomas appeals to the authority of the Sacred Scripture for those divine truths that surpass the capacity of reason.

The present volume is the second part of a treatise on the hierarchy of creation, the divine providence over all things, and man’s relation to God. Book 1 of the Summa deals with God; Book 2, Creation; and Book 4, Salvation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780268016883
Publisher:
University of Notre Dame Press
Publication date:
01/01/1975
Edition description:
1
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
952,178
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

PART II Chapters 84-163(79)
84. That the celestial bodies make no impression on our intellects
13(5)
85. That the celestial bodies are not the causes of our acts of will and choice
18(7)
86. That the corporeal effects in things here below do not necessarily result from the celestial bodies
25(5)
87. That the motion of a celestial body is not the cause of our acts of choice by the power of its soul moving us, as some say
30(3)
88. That separate created substances cannot be directly the cause of our acts of choice and will, but only God
33(2)
89. That the movement of the will is caused by God and not only the power of the will
35(2)
90. That human acts of choice and of will are subject to divine providence
37(3)
91. How human events may be traced back to higher causes
40(2)
92. How a person is favored by fortune and how man is assisted by higher causes
42(7)
93. On fate: whether and what it is
49(1)
94. On the certainty of divine providence
50(8)
95. That the immutability of divine providence does not suppress the value of prayer
58(2)
96. That some prayers are not granted by God
60(6)
97. How the disposition of providence has a rational plan
66(7)
98. How God can act apart from the order of His providence, and how not
73(2)
99. That God can work apart from the order implanted in things, by producing effects without proximate causes
75(4)
100. That things which God does apart from the order of nature are not contrary to nature
79(2)
101. On miracles
81(2)
102. That God alone works miracles
83(3)
103. How spiritual substances do certain wonderful things which, however, are not truly miracles
86(3)
104. That the works of magicians are not solely due to the influence of celestial bodies
89(5)
105. Where the performances of the magicians get their efficacy
94(3)
106. That the intellectual substance which provides the efficacy for magic works is not morally good
97(3)
107. That the intellectual substance whose help the arts of magic use is not evil in its own nature
100(4)
108. Arguments whereby it seems to be proved that there can be no sin in demons
104(3)
109. That sin can occur in demons, and in what way
107(5)
110. Answer to the previous arguments
112(2)
111. That rational creatures are subject to divine providence in a special way
114(1)
112. That rational creatures are governed for their own sakes, while others are governed in subordination to them
115(5)
113. That the rational creature is directed by God to his actions not only by an ordering of the species, but also according to what befits the individual
120(2)
114. That laws are divinely given to man
122(2)
115. That the divine law principally orders man toward God
124(1)
116. That the end of divine law is the love of God
125(2)
117. That we are ordered by divine law to the love of neighbor
127(2)
118. That through divine law men are bound to the right faith
129(2)
119. That our mind is directed to God by certain sense objects
131(2)
120. That the cult proper to latria is to be offered to God alone
133(8)
121. That divine law orders man according to reason in regard to corporeal and sensible things
141(1)
122. The reason why simple fornication is a sin according to divine law, and that matrimony is natural
142(5)
123. That matrimony should be indivisible
147(3)
124. That matrimony should be between one man and one woman
150(3)
125. That matrimony should not take place between close relatives
153(2)
126. That not all sexual intercourse is sinful
155(1)
127. That the use of food is not a sin in itself
156(3)
128. How man is ordered by the law of God in regard to his neighbor
159(3)
129. That some human acts are right according to nature and not merely because they are prescribed by law
162(3)
130. On the counsels that are given in divine law
165(2)
131. On the error of the attackers of voluntary poverty
167(2)
132. On the ways of life of those who practice voluntary poverty
169(8)
133. In what way poverty is good
177(2)
134. Answers to the arguments brought forward above against poverty
179(3)
135. Answer to the objections against the different ways of life of those who embrace voluntary poverty
182(8)
136. On the error of those who attack perpetual continence
190(5)
137. Another error concerning perpetual continence
195(1)
138. Against those who attack vows
196(3)
139. That neither meritorious acts nor sins are equal
199(5)
140. That a man's acts are punished or rewarded by God
204(3)
141. On the diversity and order of punishments
207(3)
142. That not all rewards and punishments are equal
210(2)
143. On the punishment due to mortal and venial sin in relation to the ultimate end
212(2)
144. That by mortal sin a man is eternally deprived of his ultimate end
214(4)
145. That sins are punished also by the experience of something painful
218(1)
146. That it is lawful for judges to inflict punishments
219(4)
147. That man needs divine help to attain happiness
223(3)
148. That by the help of divine grace man is not forced toward virtue
226(2)
149. That man cannot merit divine help in advance
228(2)
150. That the aforesaid divine help is called grace, and what sanctifying grace is
230(3)
151. That sanctifying grace causes the love of God in us
233(2)
152. That divine grace causes faith in us
235(2)
153. That divine grace causes hope in us
237(2)
154. On the gifts of gratuitous grace, including a consideration of the divinations of demons
239(11)
155. That man needs the help of grace to persevere in the good
250(3)
156. That he who falls from grace through sin may again be restored through grace
253(2)
157. That man cannot be freed from sin except through grace
255(1)
158. How man is freed from sin
256(4)
159. That it is reasonable to hold a man responsible if he does not turn toward God, even though he cannot do this without grace
260(1)
160. That man in the state of sin, without grace, cannot avoid sin
261(2)
161. That God frees some men from sin and leaves others in sin
263(2)
162. That God is not the cause of sin for any person
265(2)
163. On predestination, reprobation, and divine election
267(2)
Subject Index 269(11)
Index of Proper Names 280

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