The Summer of the Great-Grandmother (Crosswicks Journal Series #2)

The Summer of the Great-Grandmother (Crosswicks Journal Series #2)

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by Madeleine L'Engle
     
 

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This journal offers a loving and poignant portrait of L'Engle's mother in old age that is more about living than dying.

Overview

This journal offers a loving and poignant portrait of L'Engle's mother in old age that is more about living than dying.

Editorial Reviews

Washington Post
Anyone who has dealt with, or will soon with, the death of a parent will find some solace, understanding, and companionship in this perceptive book, which is, in the end, more about living than about dying.
From the Publisher

"An honest and courageous account of the long summer the author watched her ninety-year-old mother slowly die." -The Horn Book

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062545060
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/28/1984
Series:
Crosswicks Journal Series , #2
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
190,829
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.58(d)

Meet the Author

Madeline L'Engle, the popular author of many books for children and adults, has interspersed her writing and teaching career with raising three children, maintaining an apartment in New York and a farmhouse of charming confusion which is called "Crosswicks."

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
January 12, 1918
Date of Death:
September 6, 2007
Place of Birth:
New York, NY
Place of Death:
Litchfield, CT
Education:
Smith College, 1941

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Summer of the Great-Grandmother: A Crosswicks Journal 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
JenCM More than 1 year ago
I have read L'Engle's A Ring of Endless Light nearly every year since I first discovered it, so I could trace many of the thoughts, scenes, details, and philosophies back to Summer of the Great-Grandmother. Her experiences as care-giver for her mother carried over into her fiction. I loved Summer of the Great-Grandmother for many of the same reasons I love A Ring of Endless Light: they both affirm the value of individuals, the importance of family, the necessity of exploring outlets for grief, the need for the knowledge that "it's alright" and "it's all right." L'Engle never settles for easy answers, but always finds hope, even in the midst of great pain.