Summertime Song

Summertime Song

5.0 1
by Irene Haas
     
 

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One warm summer night, a frog jumped into Lucy's room with an invitation for her to a birthday party and a magic paper party hat. Lucy put it on, and out in the garden, when a moonbeam touched the hat, Lucy was as little as a leaf. So begins Lucy's wonderful adventure.
A taxi driven by Baby Bird, who is afraid to fly, picks Lucy up to take her to the party. On

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Overview

One warm summer night, a frog jumped into Lucy's room with an invitation for her to a birthday party and a magic paper party hat. Lucy put it on, and out in the garden, when a moonbeam touched the hat, Lucy was as little as a leaf. So begins Lucy's wonderful adventure.
A taxi driven by Baby Bird, who is afraid to fly, picks Lucy up to take her to the party. On the way, they stop for Madame Mouse, wearing a brand new hat she's made; an inch-worm determined to get to the party in time to have some birthday cake; and a tiny tattered old doll whose owner, for whom he still longs, had lost him in the shadows of moonlight long ago. But suddenly, a huge owl blocks their way — and he wants them all for his supper! Will they escape? Will they get to the party? Will the tiny doll ever be reunited with his beloved owner?
In a lovely, lyrical text, the story unfolds to its happy ending. The magical pictures, painted with intricate detail and subtle colors, bring the moonlit garden world to life. This is an extraordinary book of great beauty and vivid imagination that small children and adults will look at again and again, discovering new wonders and surprises as they look. It is a treasure by the widely known and loved author/artist of The Maggie B.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The Washington Post A picture book for all seasons.

Publishers Weekly An oversize, square format right away announces that his book is special, and the contents live up to the heightened expectations...Haas wraps [her story] up in gorgeous illustrations whose sumptuous imagery and sultry compositions virtually define romance and mystery...The art is spellbindingly lavish...A treasure of images, this is a book to savor.

Kirkus Reviews An opulent book that sports sumptuous watercolors, a lively tempo, and clever energy...Haas touches the story with rhyme here and there, infuses it with hope and old-fashioned enchantment, and loads the artwork with details that continue to reveal themselves upon additional readings.

The New York Times Book Review This is an old-fashioned, lavish, and child-friendly storybook. The format is large, the paper is creamy, and Ms. Haas's gorgeous and fully developed watercolor paintings are delicate and filled with curious details that a child can ponder during the day as well as at bedtime...A Summertime Song is gentle, sweet, and intimate...This is a song with a happy, perfect resolution...Don't we need one magic night of perfect resolution, a dance in a circle where everyone holds hands? Such is the graceful dance done to A Summertime Song.

The Washington Post Irene Haas's latest work may be called A Summertime Song, but it is a picture book for all seasons...I can think of no more sumptuous effort in the history of American picture books...Here is a lush, oversized volume with generous, cream-colored pages and the heady fragrance of old printer's ink. It looks and smells like a classic...Haas has captured that early moment in one's life when the whole world is full of wonders, just before the Wild Things set in...Savor A Summertime Song.

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
An oversize, square format right away announces that this book is special, and the contents live up to the heightened expectations. The story-a sweet fantasy about a magical birthday party held in a moonlit garden-is well-told if not wholly original, but Haas (The Maggie B.) wraps it up in gorgeous illustrations whose sumptuous imagery and sultry compositions virtually define romance and mystery. On a summer night, Lucy receives a frog's invitation to a party, dons the paper hat he brings her and shrinks ("FOOF!") until she is "as little as a leaf." She hops into a taxi driven by a baby bird, who subsequently picks up other party-goers, among them a doll that once belonged to Lucy's grandmother and has been lost for decades; the doll and its owner are reunited at the end � la William Joyce's The Leaf Men. The characters throughout are colorfully individuated through varied, distinctive speech patterns, and Haas adds a soup�on of suspense via an owl intent on finding his dinner. The art is spellbindingly lavish: a softly glowing black background, a strewing of velvety flowers and papery leaves, a doll-like Lucy and a host of inviting, finely detailed creatures. Haas mingles these elements with deceptive ease, and punctuates her full-page art with small vignettes that decorate facing pages of text. A treasury of images, this is a book to savor.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
An oversize, square format right away announces that this book is special, and the contents live up to the heightened expectations. The storya sweet fantasy about a magical birthday party held in a moonlit gardenis well-told if not wholly original, but Haas (The Maggie B.) wraps it up in gorgeous illustrations whose sumptuous imagery and sultry compositions virtually define romance and mystery. On a summer night, Lucy receives a frog's invitation to a party, dons the paper hat he brings her and shrinks ("FOOF!") until she is "as little as a leaf." She hops into a taxi driven by a baby bird, who subsequently picks up other party-goers, among them a doll that once belonged to Lucy's grandmother and has been lost for decades; the doll and its owner are reunited at the end la William Joyce's The Leaf Men. The characters throughout are colorfully individuated through varied, distinctive speech patterns, and Haas adds a soupon of suspense via an owl intent on finding his dinner. The art is spellbindingly lavish: a softly glowing black background, a strewing of velvety flowers and papery leaves, a doll-like Lucy and a host of inviting, finely detailed creatures. Haas mingles these elements with deceptive ease, and punctuates her full-page art with small vignettes that decorate facing pages of text. A treasury of images, this is a book to savor. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
It is a warm summer night. A frog jumps through Lucy's window and gives her an invitation to a birthday party. When she places the paper hat on her head, she is magically transformed. Our now miniature party-goer rides to the party in a taxi-a nest driven by a baby bird, and picks up other interesting partygoers. One of them is a sad Chinese doll that has been lost for many years in the garden but who still hopes to be reunited with his mistress. It is a glorious trip with a happy ending, all superbly illustrated in watercolors by Haas. The oversized pages are cream colored with text and small illustrations on one side and a full page illustration on the other, except for one gorgeous spread that kids will love examining in detail.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2Haas's book is more like a summertime dream than a song. Lucy is in bed when a frog hops in and gives her an invitation to a birthday party and a magic paper hat. When she dons the hat, she becomes as "little as a leaf" and sets out through the garden for the celebration. She accepts a ride in a taxi that looks like a nest and is driven by a baby bird who's afraid to fly. On their way, they pick up various other animals and are threatened by an owl who wants to eat them. Lucy finds a doll lost long ago by her grandmother, attends the party, and returns home. She removes the hat and is once again full-sized. Like a dream, this story seems a bit disconnected and not terribly memorable once one is awake. Haas's watercolor and pastel artwork is also dreamlike. It is often difficult to discern figures in the pictures. Stylized chapeaus obliterate some and others are lost in the dark-keyed palette. The writing is like a free-flowing poem with rhyming here and there. Overall, the book is very pretty, with large, oversized, creamy-colored pages; but like lovely bits and pieces of confetti, it glitters without substance.Judith Gloyer, Milwaukee Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
An opulent book that sports sumptuous watercolors, a lively tempo, and clever energy. A frog jumps through Lucy's window on a summer's night, with an invitation to a party and a magic paper hat. Lucy shuffles outside, and "a finger of moonlight touched the hat and FOOF! Lucy was as little as a leaf." Lucy hails a bird's- nest taxi; they stop for Madame Mouse ("Zut! I am late!), Inchworm ("I inch while I sleep,/I inch while I wake,/I inch until,/my little feet ache"), and a wee Japanese doll, lost years before and still hoping to be found. A huge owl threatens to eat them, but the taxi makes a fast escape. When the owl makes an appearance at the party, he is disarmed by the news that the birthday party is for him. "How kind! Tonight I'll eat cake—not bugs. Do you mind?" Before the evening's end, Inchworm becomes a moth and the doll regains its owner.

Haas touches the story with rhyme here and there, infuses it with hope and old-fashioned enchantment, and loads the artwork with details that continue to reveal themselves upon additional readings.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689505492
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
04/01/1997
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
663,772
Product dimensions:
12.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
670L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
The Washington Post A picture book for all seasons.

Publishers Weekly An oversize, square format right away announces that his book is special, and the contents live up to the heightened expectations...Haas wraps [her story] up in gorgeous illustrations whose sumptuous imagery and sultry compositions virtually define romance and mystery...The art is spellbindingly lavish...A treasure of images, this is a book to savor.

Kirkus Reviews An opulent book that sports sumptuous watercolors, a lively tempo, and clever energy...Haas touches the story with rhyme here and there, infuses it with hope and old-fashioned enchantment, and loads the artwork with details that continue to reveal themselves upon additional readings.

The New York Times Book Review This is an old-fashioned, lavish, and child-friendly storybook. The format is large, the paper is creamy, and Ms. Haas's gorgeous and fully developed watercolor paintings are delicate and filled with curious details that a child can ponder during the day as well as at bedtime...A Summertime Song is gentle, sweet, and intimate...This is a song with a happy, perfect resolution...Don't we need one magic night of perfect resolution, a dance in a circle where everyone holds hands? Such is the graceful dance done to A Summertime Song.

The Washington Post Irene Haas's latest work may be called A Summertime Song, but it is a picture book for all seasons...I can think of no more sumptuous effort in the history of American picture books...Here is a lush, oversized volume with generous, cream-colored pages and the heady fragrance of old printer's ink. It looks and smells like a classic...Haas has captured that early moment in one's life when the whole world is full of wonders, just before the Wild Things set in...Savor A Summertime Song.

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Meet the Author

Irene Haas is an outstanding artist who has written and illustrated a number of children's books, including The Maggie B., Little Moon Theater, and A Summertime Song, which Horn Book called "a sumptuous production." Ms. Haas lives in New York City.

Irene Haas is an outstanding artist who has written and illustrated a number of children's books, including The Maggie B., Little Moon Theater, and A Summertime Song, which Horn Book called "a sumptuous production." Ms. Haas lives in New York City.

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My children and I have made up voices for each of the charactures and can recite the book by heart. We have loved this book and have not tired of it yet. I am sure that this is a book that my children with read to their children and so on. The story and pictures have touched my own heart and imagination.