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Sun and Spoon

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Overview

After the death of his grandmother, ten-year-old Spoon observes the changes in his grandfather and tries to find the perfect artifact to preserve his memories of her.

After the death of his grandmother, ten-year-old Spoon tries to find the perfect artifact to preserve his memories of her.

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Sun & Spoon

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Overview

After the death of his grandmother, ten-year-old Spoon observes the changes in his grandfather and tries to find the perfect artifact to preserve his memories of her.

After the death of his grandmother, ten-year-old Spoon tries to find the perfect artifact to preserve his memories of her.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Since I have the very best grandchildren in the whole wide world, it was inevitable that I would adore "Sun & Spoon"—a book about a grandson seeking a special something to remind him of his recently deceased grandmother. It certainly helped that the story is exceptionally well told and very well written.

Having just published a book about grandparents, I particularly liked the fact that the plot around which this book revolves will have significant meaning to children who have lost a grandparent, or any loved one. Even adults can't adequately prepare for the loss of someone who has been an integral part of their lives. But children, especially, can be confused by the emotions they feel at such a time. For many, the passing away of a grandparent may well be the first time they are confronted with the upheaval that such a death causes to the immediate family. By reading "Sun & Spoon," children faced with the death of a loved one will be comforted in learning that they are not alone in the feelings that come over them during this difficult time. And the coping suggestions subtly made in the book—making a notebook about the deceased grandparent and finding a special memento—are very valuable ones that will hopefully be imitated by many readers.

Henkes is an experienced writer, so he makes sure that it's not just the relationship between ten-year-old Spoon and his late grandmother that unfolds but also those between Spoon and his younger sister, his parents, his older brother, and his grandfather. In each instance, the reader picks up useful insights on theinteractions that take place within a family—information that can be very helpful in dealing with real-life relationships they may encounter within their own family. Of particular importance is the reaction of Spoon's grandfather to losing his wife—his sadness, the changes in his habits. Sometimes it is harder for children to deal with the changes that take place within the character of the surviving spouse than the emotions caused by the disappearance of the person that died, because the personality changes in the survivor are constantly visible to children.

Children may try to push the deceased person out of their mind in order not to have to deal with the pain that accompanies the memories. It is very important that this does not occur, because emotions that are buried can cause more damage later on. Yet parents are prone to protect their children, even though by doing so they are not allowing them to come to terms with the process of mourning. Pyschologically speaking, Spoon's insistence of trying to keep his grandmother's memory alive is a very important example to give to children.

And then, like the chocolate nestled in the center of a Tootsie Pop, is the lesson learned about telling the truth. Subtly delivered, because Spoon's lie is not really so bad, the message comes across more strongly, I believe, than if Spoon had lied maliciously. He finds himself in a situation that any kid might, torn between revealing what he's done or merely trying to right the wrong. His choice is not the easy way out, but the right way.

Rereading what I have written, I see that I've used the word "subtly" several times, and it is that quality that I find of special value. The topic of death is not one easily dealt with, which is why I believe that Henkes should be congratulated for handling it with care while at the same time creating a story that will interest and offer valuable advice to all children, even those who haven't yet had to deal with death.

I heartily recommend "Sun & Spoon." Though I would like to believe that I will last forever, I know the time will come when my grandchildren will have to face the loss of their Omi [grandmother], just as they have already lost their grandfather. I could wish them no better tool to help them deal with such circumstances than to read this book. Recommended for ages 8 and up.—Dr. Ruth Westheimer

Five Owls
Sun and Spoon, so simply told, trust readers with truths that many children's authors avoid or treat mawkishly. Weighty though his subject is, Henkes's touch is light and deft. The book is fresh, delightful from start to end.
Elizabeth Spires
Henkes's deftness and gift in ''Sun & Spoon'' are not always in the actual story, but in his sensitive observation of each character's passions and eccentricities. The book glitters with small, memorable moments that seem true to life, yet fresh and unexpected. -- New York Times
Children's Literature - Gisela Jernigan
Oftentimes when we lose someone close to us we want to keep something of theirs as a reminder of him or her in our lives. Spoon Gilmore's Gram died two months ago and he is searching for that something special he can always have. The book is filled with Spoon's remembrances of his Gram, and how he deals with his grief. He misses playing triple solitaire with her and Pa and he knows how much she loved to collect suns. Spoon even tries to come up with a list of 52 details about her. He is afraid he is going to forget. But this is really a story about family relationships: between parent and child, brother and sister, brother and brother, grandparent and grandchild, and the living and the dead. This is a great first novel for any young reader.
Children's Literature - Sheree van Vreede
Oftentimes when we lose someone close to us, we want to keep something of theirs as a personal reminder. Spoon Gilmore's Gram died two months ago and he is searching for that something special he can always have. The book is filled with Spoon's remembrances of his Gram, and how he deals with his grief. He misses playing triple solitaire with her and Pa, and he knows how much she loved to collect suns. Spoon even tries to come up with a list of 52 details about her. He is afraid he is going to forget. But this is really a story about family relationships: between parent and child, brother and sister, brother and brother, grandparent and grandchild, and the living and the dead. This is a great first novel for any young reader.
Children's Literature
AGERANGE: Ages 8 to 14.

Spoon Gilmore has felt adrift since his grandmother's death a couple of months ago. His grandfather seems equally off-balance. It takes time to adjust to a loved one's passing, of that there can be no doubt. But what scares ten-year-old Spoon is that he seems to be losing his grandmother more all the time. His memories seem fuzzier than they were, and if he loses them, he is afraid of losing his beloved grandmother altogether. So, he settles on a plan. He determines to find an object of Gram's that he can keep that will remind him of her. It quickly becomes apparent that Spoon has made a terrible mistake. Can he set things right? Readers who have lost a grandparent will appreciate Kevin Henkes' keen understanding of their heartache, but even those lucky enough not to have personal experience with a grandparent's death will empathize with Spoon's plight. Reviewer: Heidi Hauser Green

School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Spoon, 10, spends his summer trying to reconfigure his world, which seems strangely out of kilter since his grandmother's death. A moving and positive look at the power of memory. (July, 1996)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7Ten-year-old Spoon wrestles with sorrow this first summer since his beloved Gram has passed away. His older brother takes a planned cross-country trip to visit their other grandmother, but Spoon stays home. Worrying that his memories of Gram will fade, he seeks a special remembrance of her. Everything is a bit off-kilter, especially Pa, his grandfather. The grieving man can't get enough of six-year-old pesky Joanie and the bone collection she carts around in her suitcase, but he doesn't have the heart to play cards with Spoon, because Gram is no longer there to be the third participant in triple solitaire. Spoon finds the perfect talisman and secretly pockets it, creating a turmoil in Pa that is difficult to resolve. Verbal communication can be so difficult and yet the boy finds the courage to face up to his theft. Given the opportunity to keep the desired memento, Spoon chooses to accept a once unappreciated photo and discovers a magical, mystical, memorable connection to his grandmother. Once again Henkes captures young angst with respect and honesty. A subject that could be overwhelmingly dark and cloudy is illuminated most comfortingly. Images of supportive parents and love between generations shine through without a heavy hand. Imagery of weather and art and dreams will be caught and appreciated by thoughtful readers. Cynthia Rylant's Missing May Orchard, 1992 and Sharon Mathis's The Hundred Penny Box Viking, 1975 also demonstrate powerful concerns about remembering loved ones.Marilyn Payne Phillips, University City Public Library, MO
Kirkus Reviews
Wearing his novelist's hat, Henkes (Protecting Marie, 1995, etc.) offers another meticulously crafted, quietly engaging epiphany: A 10-year-old looking for just the right memento of his recently dead grandmother finds it literally in his hands.

It's been two months since Gram's funeral, and Spoon, worried about his fading memories of her, surreptitiously searches his grandparents' house for something of hers with which to anchor them. He settles at last on the deck of cards she always used for solitaire, but his twinge of guilt becomes knife- edged when Pa, his grieving grandfather, allows that he'd been taking some comfort from using those cards, and can't sleep for wondering what happened to them. Spoon finds the courage to put them back and to confess; later he discovers something better—a tracing of Gram's hand, made when she was his age, with a big M on it and the legend, "M is always for Martha," which was her name. Why better? Because he finds the same M in the creases in the lines of his own palm, as well as in his younger sister's and parents' palms. Henkes deftly delineates characters and relationships with brief conversations and small personal or family rituals, folds in motifs—hands, the sun—to give the plot a pleasing rhythm, and consistently finds the perfect words to evoke each moment's sometimes-complex feelings. Like Henkes's other novels, this is more restrained in tone than his picture books, but it is infused with the same good humor, wisdom, and respect for children's hearts and minds that characterize all his works.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780780789593
  • Publisher: Perfection Learning
  • Publication date: 10/28/1998
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 135
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Kevin Henkes is the author and illustrator of close to fifty critically acclaimed and award-winning picture books, beginning readers, and novels. He received the Caldecott Medal for Kitten's First Full Moon in 2005. Kevin Henkes is also the creator of a number of picture books featuring his mouse characters, including the #1 New York Times bestsellers Lilly's Big Day and Wemberly Worried, the Caldecott Honor Book Owen, and the beloved Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse. His most recent mouse character, Penny, was introduced in Penny and Her Song (2012); her story continued in Penny and Her Doll and Penny and Her Marble (a Geisel Honor Book). Bruce Handy, in a New York Times Book Review piece about A Good Day, wrote, "It should be said: Kevin Henkes is a genius." Kevin Henkes received two Newbery Honors for novels—one for his newest novel for young readers, The Year of Billy Miller, and the other for Olive's Ocean. Also among his fiction for older readers are the novels Junonia, Bird Lake Moon, The Birthday Room, and Sun & Spoon. He lives with his family in Madison, Wisconsin.

Biography

Kevin Henkes still owns some of his favorite books from childhood. "They're brimming with all the telltale signs of true love: dog-eared pages, fingerprints on my favorite illustrations, my name and address inscribed on both front and back covers in inch-high lettering, and the faint smell of stale peanut butter on the bindings," he says in an interview on his web site.

Back in his peanut-butter sandwich days, Henkes dreamed of becoming an artist. By high school, he had combined his love of drawing with a newfound interest in writing, and at age 19, he took his portfolio to New York City in hopes of finding a publisher. Young Henkes returned home from his weeklong trip with a contract from Greenwillow Books, and he's worked as a children's writer and illustrator ever since.

Henkes's style has evolved over the years to include more humor, more whimsy and a lot more mice. Though he began illustrating his picture books with realistic drawings of children, he's since developed a recurring cast of mouse characters rendered in a more cartoon-like style -- though with a range of expressions that make the spirited Lilly, anxious Wemberly, fearless Sheila Rae and sensitive Chrysanthemum into highly believable heroines. Owen, the story of a little mouse who isn't ready to give up his tattered security blanket, won a Caldecott Honor Medal for its winsome watercolor-and-ink illustrations.

Many of Henkes's mouse books deal with such common childhood ordeals as starting school, being teased and getting lost. Chrysanthemum, about a mouse whose new schoolmates tease her about her name, was inspired by Henkes's own feelings when he started school. "The book is about family, and how starting something new and going out into the world can be very hard," he told an interviewer for The Five Owls. "I remember going to kindergarten -- my grandfather had a beautiful rose garden, and he gave me the last roses of the season to bring to the kindergarten teacher the next day. I don't even remember how it happened, but an older kid took these flowers from me on the playground, and I remember coming home, feeling awful." As a grown-up, Henkes is able to translate difficult childhood transitions into stories that are both honest and reassuring. In a review of Chrysanthemum, Kirkus Reviews noted: "Henkes's language and humor are impeccably fresh, his cozy illustrations sensitive and funny, his little asides to adults an unobtrusive delight."

Henkes has also written novels for older children, in which he "explores family relationships with breathtaking tenderness" (Publisher's Weekly). In The Birthday Room, for example, a twelve-year-old boy learns the reason for his mother's long estrangement from her brother, and helps effect a reconciliation. "Refreshingly, Henkes has given us a male protagonist who is reflective, creative and emotionally sensitive," wrote Karen Leggett in The New York Times Book Review. "Ben feels the anguish of his mother's long-simmering bitterness and his uncle's agonizing guilt. Yet at a time when it is almost a fad to blame dysfunctional families for problems, we learn that even though there are never simple answers and not many fairy-tale endings, families can heal."

Though his novels are more complex and serious than his picture books, all Henkes's works suggest an author with deep empathy for the intense emotions of childhood. As a Publisher's Weekly reviewer wrote, "Behind each book is a wide-open heart, one readers can't help but respond to, that makes all of Henkes's books of special value to children."

Good To Know

Henkes's wife, Laura Dronzek, is also an artist. She painted the cover illustration for Henkes' novel Sun and Spoon and illustrated his picture book Oh!.

Henkes has turned down requests to use his mouse characters in a television series, but some of his books are available in video form in Chrysanthemum and More Kevin Henkes Stories. The video's narrators include Meryl Streep, Sarah Jessica Parker and Mary Beth Hurt.

Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse has been adapted into a stage play.

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    1. Hometown:
      Madison, Wisconsin
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 27, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      Racine, Wisconsin
    1. Education:
      University of Wisconsin, Madison
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Sun & Spoon by Kevin Henkes

Part One: The Search

SPOON GILMORE'S GRANDMOTHER had been dead for two months when he realized that he wanted something special of hers to keep. This thought came to him in the middle of a hot, sticky July night and nagged at him off and on until morning.

It was all he could think about at breakfast. He was sitting alone at the kitchen table having the same breakfast he had almost every morning -- a bowl of Cap'n Crunch and a glass of grape juice. His hand wobbled and his juice glass grazed his cheek, nearly missing his mouth, he was so preoccupied. Juice dribbled down his chin. He wiped the juice with the back of his hand, then wiped his hand on his T-shirt.

Something of Gram's. Spoon had been dreaming about her since her death. Not frightening dreams. But dreams in which she would pass through a room quickly, or be sitting in a chair in a shadowy corner, watching. At first, the dreams were constant, every night, but they were growing less frequent. Spoon was afraid of losing what little was left of her -- his memories. He was afraid of forgetting her. That's why he wanted something of hers.

He didn't know exactly what he had in mind, but he knew what he didn't have in mind: a photograph. Spoon disliked photographs of himself and he assumed that that's the way it was with most people. It surely had been the case with Gram, who, upon seeing a photo of herself, would sniff, disgusted, and brush it aside. A photograph of Gram would not work. A photograph definitely was not what he was looking for. He needed something of Gram's that had been important to her. And he didn't want the "something" to be a girl thing like a necklace or a pin or an earring.

What could it be?

Sunlight shone through the large kitchen window, turning the tabletop white. Out the window Spoon could see his parents already at work in the garden. His father, Scott, was a fourth-grade teacher and his mother, Kay, taught art at the same school, Lincoln Elementary, to all the grades, kindergarten through fifth. Because they both had the summers free, they had become devoted gardeners over the years. Scott was most interested in vegetables and his compost bin, and Kay spent most of her time with her flowers. From dawn until dusk, day in and day out, all summer long, they could usually be found in the garden.

This particular summer was supposed to have been different, though. The entire family had planned to travel by car from their home in Madison, Wisconsin, to Eugene, Oregon, where Spoon's maternal grandmother, Evie, lived. They were going to take their time, stop along the way, see things that most people miss because of their hurried pace. But Spoon's other grandmother, the one who had lived in Madison just five blocks away, had died suddenly in May of a heart attack. Gram. Pa lived alone now in the house Spoon's father had grown up in.

"Mom and I can't leave Pa alone in Madison for the summer," Scott had told his three children early in June, glancing from one to the next to the next, then looking away and jingling the change in his pocket. Sadness showed in his eyes and in the droop of his shoulders. "Even if we'd cut the trip short...I can't do it. So the trip we planned is canceled. We'll try again next year. But Mom and I talked with Evie. And she'll fly any or all of you out west if you want to go. For as long as you'd like. So think about it...."

Joanie, who was six, couldn't bear to leave her mother.

Charlie, who was twelve, said yes instantly.

And Spoon, who was ten and in the middle, thought and thought and thought before finally saying no.

Charlie called him a baby. And maybe he was. But this was the first time someone he loved would be gone forever. He didn't like to think about the forever part. But when he did, which was often, the only place he wanted to be was home.

Evie's husband, Henry, had died long before Spoon was born, so Spoon only knew him through stories and photographs. He felt no real connection to Henry, but his connection to Gram was strong.

With his gaze fixed steadily on his bowl of Cap'n Crunch and his arms encircling it, Spoon sat as if in a trance, racking his brain for a solution. Something of Gram's. What could it be?

He sat and sat.

The cereal had become soggy. The milk in the bowl had turned a yellowy color, inedible. I've come up with nothing, Spoon thought, and I've wasted breakfast. He frowned at the bowl and pushed it away.

"I thought you liked Cap'n Crunch," said Joanie, popping up from behind the counter. She had the annoying habit of surprising Spoon, turning up when he least expected it. And this summer she was worse than ever.

He ignored her, rising from the table and placing his dishes in the sink.

"You can have some of my Floopies," she told him. That's what she called Froot Loops, the only cereal she would eat. "But you can't read the box. You'll fill your head with too much stuff. And then you won't have room for other stuff."

Spoon turned toward her and shot her a look that said, You're crazy.

"Do you think we'll get a postcard from Charlie today?" Joanie asked in her high-pitched voice.

"Do I care?" He did. But he would never let on. He was still by the sink with his back to her, and he could feel her presence like a persistent itch. He decided to do the few dishes there were, hoping she'd be gone by the time he finished.

Joanie stood behind Spoon, waiting, clutching the handle of her little green-and-black plaid canvas suitcase. Despite the heat, she was wearing her red hooded sweatshirt with the hood up. Her head looked pointy like an elf's. The sweatshirt had first been Charlie's, then Spoon's, and now it belonged to Joanie. She loved it the way other children love blankets or teddy bears. The cuffs were ragged, little holes had cropped up along the seams as if the stitches were rotting, and because it had been worn and laundered so many times it wasn't actually red any longer but the pale washy color of watermelon flesh.

"I can help you," Joanie offered, banging her suitcase against her knees.

"Nope. I'm almost done." His dishes were washed and rinsed and in the drying rack, but he continued to swish his hands about in the water for effect.

"Want to see what's in my suitcase?"

"I already know what's in your suitcase. Twigs."

"It's full of bones," Joanie said in a fierce whisper. "And I've got some new ones."

"They're twigs, not bones."

"They are bones. The bones of trees!" she shrieked. "And I collect them." She hopped with delight, a tiny hop.

Spoon spun around, drying his hands on a dish towel. He gently tapped Joanie's head. "Just as I thought," he said. "Hollow."

As usual, Joanie just smiled at Spoon's insult, which always put him in a low mood. Charlie's insults could diminish Spoon, and he wondered why he didn't have the same power over Joanie.

"What are you going to do today?" Joanie asked.

"Whatever it is, you're not included," is what Spoon said, but he was smart enough to know that she would try to follow him no matter how hard he wished it to be otherwise. The privacy that he needed today would not be easy to come by. After tossing the dish towel on the table, Spoon set his jaw and looked at Joanie with narrow eyes, trying to send a message: Do not tag along today.

I've got to get moving, he thought. I've got to get something of Gram's. First, he'd ask permission from his parents to walk to Pa's house, and then he'd be on his way. He headed for the back door.

"Where are you going?"

No response.

"Where are you going?"

No response.

Joanie slipped in front of her brother. "Where are you going?" she asked again, her voice musical, her blue eyes round. Her ability to wear him down was uncanny.

"I've got an important project to work on," Spoon replied under his breath in exasperation. Instantly he was regretful. He hated himself for being such a big mouth, so he pinched his leg as hard as he could, imagining that it was Joanie he was pinching.

"Tell me, tell me!" Joanie jumped up and down, scraping the wall with her suitcase. "Where are you going?"

Spoon was losing his temper. The wings of his nostrils flared and reddened. "Okay!" he shouted, giving in. "Okay! I'm going over to Pa's. But you're not coming with me. Repeat after me: I will not follow you."

"I will not," was all Joanie managed to repeat, so as not to lie. Her cheeks flushed with excitement.

But Spoon didn't even hear her. He was already out the door. He was trying another tactic. He was running as fast as he could.

Excerpt from SUN & SPOON by Kevin Henkes. Copyright © 1997 by Kevin Henkes. Used by permission of Greenwillow Books, a division of William Morrow & Company, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 25 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2014

    Lilywolf

    Hola! Ok sorry I thought you were Sunburst! Ha! Did you want to talk about something else? ~ Lilywolf &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Raven

    Good! Lol. I only cuss guys out on here. Irl I don't really have problems with guys cuz I'm homeschooled and Ii only know like two. Lol

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2014

    Britta

    Is here.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    To nightsun

    I got locked out of our sun res and thw sexclan main camp res -shadowmist

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2014

    Flameheart

    You gonna tell me yet?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2014

    Fluffy

    She was tied to a post

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    Mellisa

    Can i join.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    To taylor

    Hth srry bye

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  • Posted May 17, 2010

    dessapointing

    we expected more, didnt like it at all

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2010

    best book ever

    this book is funny and it can relate to alot of people in many ways!!! this book is awesome for beginers and for whom ever... YOU HAVE TO READ IT!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2008

    A charmer

    What a wonderful read. Poignant and funny. So simple and yet it carries a tender message. This is one of my favorite books! It's a quick read and worth every minute! I plan on reading others by the same author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2005

    Great book about family

    This book was soooooooooo good! It talks about family affairs and I think that was very interesting. Good work, Mr. Henkes!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2004

    A Very Memorable Book!

    This book is a great read for anyone who enjoys drama, conflict, and humor. It's about a ten year old boy named Spoon. His grandma passed away recently. He becomes scared he might forget her. So he winds up taking something that he wasn't supposed to have taken. Spoon then feels a lot of guilt building up inside of him. But in the end, he finds a way through everything. Many could probably relate to this story. When a loved one passes away, you want to remember them. Sun & Spoon is a great read, so pick it up and read it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2003

    Wonderful Author, Wonderful Story

    I loved this story when I was 10 and I still love it today. It is a must read for those that are soft at heart! Kevin Henkes is a wonderful author and coming from an experience with him, he is a wonderful person in real life. Enjoy reading 'Sun and Spoon!'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2000

    5 STARS TOTALLY

    I THINK THAT THIS BOOK IS GREAT AND OUTSTANDING. I ALSO RECOMMEND THIS BOOK TO ALL MY FRIENDS, I LOVE THE AUTHOR!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2000

    Kylie, age 9, Eden Prairie, MN

    The book is about a kid named Spoon. His grandma died and he wanted something to remember her by, but not a picture. He went to Pa's house and took a deck of grams cards with suns on them. He did not ask Pa. Pa was sad when he knew the cards were missing. Read the book to find out what Spoon does. I liked the book because it's about doing the right thing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2000

    Sun and Spoon - sometimes boring sometimes not.

    Spoon Gilmore needs something to remember his grandmother by.He doesn't want a photo.He dislikes photos.When he goes to Pa's one day, he takes grams deck of cards. Spoon feels very guilty and gram keeps showing up in his dreams. How will Spoon give them back with out anyone noticing he took them?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2000

    One good book!!!

    Sun and Spoon is a good book for people who like feeling books. Sun and Spoon is about a boy named Spoon whose grandma dies. Spoon wants to have something to remember her by. It turns out the thing Spoon takes is important to Pa, Gram's husband. When Pa finds out what happened what will happen? Read Sun and Spoon to find out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2000

    A sad moment.

    Spoon has just had his Gram die and he thinks he needs something to remember her by because he dosen't want to forget her. So he goes to his Pa's house and looks around and he finds something perfect!But he dosen't tell anyone about them. But then he starts feeling guilty about them.Will he return them?, what are they?,read this book Sun and Spoon to find out!

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