A Sun for the Dying [NOOK Book]

Overview

Rico has been banished to society's margins; he has neither a roof over his head nor a steady income on which to depend. When a friend and fellow clochard dies of exposure after a night spent in the Paris metro, Rico decides to flee the northern cold for his beloved south, for Marseilles and the Mediterranean. From the celebrated author of the Marseilles Trilogy, this is both an affecting on-the-road novel and a tender exploration of love's power both to heal and to destroy. ...
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A Sun for the Dying

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Overview

Rico has been banished to society's margins; he has neither a roof over his head nor a steady income on which to depend. When a friend and fellow clochard dies of exposure after a night spent in the Paris metro, Rico decides to flee the northern cold for his beloved south, for Marseilles and the Mediterranean. From the celebrated author of the Marseilles Trilogy, this is both an affecting on-the-road novel and a tender exploration of love's power both to heal and to destroy.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Izzo (1945-2000) returns to Marseille (Total Chaos, etc.) with a bleak, affecting tale about a man on the skids, despairing of love's ability to heal. Rico, the 40-something, hard-drinking transient protagonist, still smarts from the breakup in Rennes from his beautiful, avaricious wife, Sophie. Living on the streets of Paris when his down-and-out friend, Tito, dies curled up on the metro train, Rico, grief-stricken, decides to return to Marseille, where 20 years before as a recently demobilized marine he meet his first love, Léa. The novel becomes a kind of desperate road trip (Tito used to tell Rico about Kerouac's On the Road) as Rico bums his way from Paris to Marseille. Abdou, a 13-year-old Algerian refugee boy in search of a father, takes over the narrative when Rico, increasingly ill, beat up and alcoholic, sinks into a state of delusional regret. Izzo's last novel proves riveting and grim. (Aug.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Time Out New York
Izzo not only has a keen eye for detail . . . but also digs deep into what makes men weep.
The Economist
Just as Raymond Chandler and James Ellroy made Los Angeles their very own, so Mr. Izzo has made Marseilles so much more than just another geographical setting.
Le Point (France)
Our last true romantic, Jean-Claude Izzo transmits warmth to his readers, as if granting them a mouthful of pure love. A Sun for the Dying is beautiful, like a black sun, tragic and desperate.
Kirkus Reviews
A drifter escapes to Marseilles in this dark work from Izzo (The Lost Sailors, 2007, etc.). When drifter Rico's entertaining friend Titi, who recited tales from books long gone, dies of exposure in a Paris metro, Rico decides he must flee the cold city. Although leaving Paris means finally giving up on his unfaithful ex-wife and beloved son, he hopes to revive a happier relationship with the long-lost Lea, whom he left in Marseilles before betrayal, bad luck and his own rampant alcoholism drove him into the street. Along the way, he meets up with other drifters, including the dashing but dangerous Dede and the childlike Felix. Rico quickly finds himself torn between bitter and sweet memories. These memories-of Lea, of his ill-fated marriage to the social-climbing Sophie, of fellow alcoholic Julie-reveal Rico's history and come to seem as real as his waking adventures, particularly as the booze and a worsening respiratory illness take their toll. When he recalls Titi, Rico's tale resembles a French Midnight Cowboy, as memories and fantasies both begin to seem equally real. Rico's pressing needs for shelter, food and alcohol create an awful momentum, driving him toward the inevitable end. Much of this short book is relayed either in dialogue form or as Rico's interior monologue. Only the final section, told in the first person by a teenaged urchin, disrupts the intimacy. Difficult but rewarding reading that offers an unflinching look at a social problem, related through the journey of one sad man.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781609451707
  • Publisher: Europa
  • Publication date: 4/16/2013
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jean-Claude Izzo achieved immediate success with his Marseilles trilogy, published in English by Europa Editions. He died in 2000 at the age of fifty- five.

About the Translator
Howard Curtis lives in London. His many translations include three novels by Georges Simenon, Marc Dugain's The Officers' Ward, nominated for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, and Edoardo Albinati's Coming Back, winner of the John Florio Italian Translation Prize. He is the translator of all three books in the Marseilles trilogy.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2015

    L&beta

    So far, from the ones I have read yet, this is my favourite. I think it will stay my favourite actually...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2014

    Lin

    It's not that depressing. But whatever. Again, magnifique.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2014

    Little Angel

    (Another depressing one. Happen to be good at those. I will take topic requests of you give them, but dont expect me to get it done immediately. I can do certain formats as well, but refrain from asking me to do metered poems. Far too much effort. Ask for any requests in the next result or in the closest open result i dont have a poem in.) <br>
    <br>
    Hold the anger in, little angel <br>
    Soon it will burst <br>
    And you will fly away. <br>
    <br>
    Hold the hurt in, little angel <br>
    Dwell on it <br>
    It will bring you closer to the edge. <br>
    <br>
    Hold the sadness in, little angel <br>
    Tears have no purpose here <br>
    You will never cry again. <br>
    <br>
    Hold the fear in, little angel <br>
    You control it <br>
    Let it grow and fester. <br>
    <br>
    Hold the darkness in, little angel <br>
    Let the night overcome you <br>
    Let it carry you far away<br>
    <br>
    Sleep tight, little angel,<br>
    And never wake up.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    ~~[(Blank)]~~

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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