Sunday Chutney

Overview

The new girl at school has a glamourous life. What more could she want? Sunday Chutney is not your ordinary every-day girl. Sunday has lived everywhere and been everywhere. The only problem is this means she is always the new girl at school and she never really has a place to call come. But Sunday doesn't mind, not really. After all, she doesn't care what people think, she loves her own company, she has heaps of imaginary friends, so many important interests that keep her very busy . . . and ...

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Overview

The new girl at school has a glamourous life. What more could she want? Sunday Chutney is not your ordinary every-day girl. Sunday has lived everywhere and been everywhere. The only problem is this means she is always the new girl at school and she never really has a place to call come. But Sunday doesn't mind, not really. After all, she doesn't care what people think, she loves her own company, she has heaps of imaginary friends, so many important interests that keep her very busy . . . and traveling is so glamorous. What more could Sunday Chutney want?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sunday Chutney has thick glasses, a huge smile, a plaid dress and a mane of dark, curly hair. She's lived all over the world, “which is great,” though it leaves her “always the new kid.” Her story is full of sparkle (“I enjoy my own company... and I have an excellent imagination”), yet she doesn't sidestep personal doubts and dislikes (“I really, really don't like my lazy eye”). Blabey (Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley) lays the pages out scrapbook style, with “photographs” and panels to break up the spreads. A drab palette of gray and brown and olive, while an odd choice for an essentially cheerful book, serves to carry through Sunday's ability to see the good and the bad together. “Sometimes I feel a bit lonely,” Sunday says, watching a group of girls in the distance. “But only sometimes,” she adds, as her excellent imagination provides her an elephant and a bear to play with. A fine character study of an effervescent girl who isn't struggling, exactly, but who still has a lot on her plate. Ages 3–up. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Spunky Sunday Chutney introduces herself as "a bit unusual." Because her dad's job takes them all over the world, she admits that it is not easy always being the new kid in school. But she does not care because she is independent and has many interests. She lists the things she does not like—creamed corn and bullies for example—and some things she does—like her parents. She has great plans for the future, but we sense a touch of loneliness in her peripatetic life. Her one wish is to "always have the same home." But then she adds, "Or maybe a monster truck. It depends." What she has for sure is a fine imagination. As the simple text relates the basic facts of her wanderings, the illustrations we see, many as snapshots, show her acting out the events: eating stacks of crumpets while wearing a chef's hat; carrying a sign in a crowd supporting "worthy causes;" dreaming of her future life in fashion design or space travel. The acrylic and mixed media pictures begin with her jacket/cover portrait, a wiry youngster with a single curved line for her huge smile and eyes staring widely from behind thick-framed glasses. Her cheer amid her difficult life makes us smile, while other youngsters who must move a lot will find some sympathy here amid the humor. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Blabey offers a charming glimpse of childhood resilience and ambivalence through his title character. Sunday, all glasses and funny hat, shares her story in a matter-of-fact tone: her father moves around a lot for his job, and she is always the new girl. She both appreciates and regrets her circumstances, presented as a series of snapshots in "good news, bad news" juxtaposition. ("I've lived all over the world. Which is great. Trouble is, I'm always starting at new schools…. And everyone thinks the new kid is weird. But guess what? I don't care.") She goes on to describe herself and her feelings in one or two sentences per page. The simple narrative is fleshed out by the acrylic and mixed-media illustrations in muted earth tones and soft edges showing that Sunday, a thin grin bisecting her round face, gets along just fine, even while she is wishing for more stability. Match this picture book with Amy Krouse Rosenthal's OK Book (HarperCollins, 2007) to introduce children to the satisfaction of independence and self-reliance.—Lisa Egly Lehmuller, St. Patrick's Catholic School, Charlotte, NC
Kirkus Reviews
An energetic, frizzy-haired girl claims her quirkiness but wrestles with her family's frequent moves. "I'm a bit unusual," Sunday introduces herself to readers, skipping rope along a hopscotch grid while blowing a pink bubble. Her smile and airborne posture connote confidence, which helps at every new school. Imagination counters her isolation, turning an empty table into an Alice in Wonderland homage and a lonely field (other children seen together, in the distance) into companionable hand-swinging with a life-size elephant and bear. But feelings of ambivalence hover. Sunday's proud of her career ambitions (fashion design featuring scuba flippers? soccer? space travel?) and skill at befriending girls, but the constant relocations upset her, no matter how "wonderfully glamorous" she calls her mobile life. Is this defensiveness, as it sounds like when she says, "boys smell, have germs, and probably love me," or true mixed feelings? Blabey doesn't answer that question, but his clear acrylics and mixed media ground Sunday's excitements and worries-shown in extreme, sometimes manic, facial expressions-on soft, solid, comforting backgrounds. (Picture book. 4-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590785973
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Aaron Blabey is a well-known award-winning Australian actor who has starred

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