Sundays at Tiffany's

( 763 )

Overview

Jane Margaux is a lonely little girl. Her mother, a powerful Broadway producer, makes time for her only once a week, for their Sunday trip to admire jewelry at Tiffany's. Jane has only one friend: a handsome, comforting, funny man named Michael. He's perfect. But only she can see him. Michael can't stay forever, though. On Jane's ninth birthday he leaves, promising her that she'll soon forget him. Years later, in her thirties, Jane is just as alone as she was as a child. And despite her own success as a ...

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Overview

Jane Margaux is a lonely little girl. Her mother, a powerful Broadway producer, makes time for her only once a week, for their Sunday trip to admire jewelry at Tiffany's. Jane has only one friend: a handsome, comforting, funny man named Michael. He's perfect. But only she can see him. Michael can't stay forever, though. On Jane's ninth birthday he leaves, promising her that she'll soon forget him. Years later, in her thirties, Jane is just as alone as she was as a child. And despite her own success as a playwright, she is even more trapped by her overbearing mother. Then she meets someone-a handsome, comforting, funny man. He's perfect. His name is Michael . . .

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Jane grew up very rich and very lonely. Her mother was much too busy with her Broadway theater company to be close to her nervous, introspective daughter. In fact, Jane had only one true friend, and he was imaginary. For years, "Michael" nurtured her in her solitude, amusing and comforting her with jokes and camaraderie. Decades later, Jane is still lonely and, though she is a successful playwright, still chained to her mother. Then one day, as if magically, Michael reappears. And this time he's real…
Woodstock Sentinel-Review (Canada)
"A love story with an irresistible twist."
Midwest Book Review
"Entertaining . . . Readers looking for a romantic escape will enjoy [this book]."
Janet Maslin
"What do women want? At this point in his career Mr. Patterson probably has a better answer than Freud did."
From the Publisher
"What do women want? At this point in his career Mr. Patterson probably has a better answer than Freud did."—Janet Maslin, New York Times

"Entertaining . . . Readers looking for a romantic escape will enjoy [this book]."—Midwest Book Review

"A love story with an irresistible twist."—Woodstock Sentinel-Review (Canada)

Library Journal

Patterson, here partnering with children's book author Charbonnet, diverges from his usual mix of blood, suspense, and terror with this captivating tale of a young woman and her soulmate. Though the characters are interesting and the dialog is realistic, it's rather a soufflé of a story that could easily float off into obscurity were it not for the outstanding narration by Ellen Archer (www.ellenarcher.com)-who, in this reviewer's opinion, is one of best readers in the business. Highly recommended for all public libraries. [Audio clip available through library.booksontape.com; the Little, Brown hc, released in April, was an LJ Best Seller, a most-borrowed title from libraries nationwide.-Ed.]
—Joseph L. Carlson

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446536318
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/1/2009
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 139,187
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.82 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

James Patterson has had more New York Times bestsellers than any other writer, ever, according to Guinness World Records. Since his first novel won the Edgar Award in 1977 James Patterson's books have sold more than 240 million copies. He is the author of the Alex Cross novels, the most popular detective series of the past twenty-five years, including Kiss the Girls and Along Came a Spider. Mr. Patterson also writes the bestselling Women's Murder Club novels, set in San Francisco, and the top-selling New York detective series of all time, featuring Detective Michael Bennett. He writes full-time and lives in Florida with his family.

Biography

James Patterson had been working as a very successful advertising copywriter when he decided to put his Masters degree in English to a somewhat different use. Inspired by bestselling hair-raising thrillers like The Day of the Jackal and The Exorcist, Patterson went to work on his first novel. Published in 1976, The Thomas Berryman Number established him as a writer of tightly constructed mysteries that move forward with the velocity of a bullet. For his startling debut, Patterson was awarded the prestigious Edgar Award for Best First Mystery Novel—an auspicious beginning to one of the most successful careers in publishing.

A string of gripping standalone mysteries followed, but it was the 1992 release of Along Came a Spider that elevated Patterson to superstar status. Introducing Alex Cross, a brilliant black police detective/forensic psychologist, the novel was the first installment in a series of bestselling thrillers that has proved to be a cash cow for the author and his publisher.

Examining Patterson's track record, it's obvious that he believes one good series deserves another…maybe even a third! In 2001, he debuted the Women's Murder Club with 1st to Die, a fast-paced thriller featuring four female crime fighters living in San Francisco—a homicide detective, a medical examiner, an assistant D.A., and a cub reporter. The successful series has continued with other numerically titled installments. Then, spinning off a set of characters from a previous novel (1998's When the Wind Blows), in 2005 he published Maximum Ride: The Angel Experiment. Featuring a "flock" of genetically engineered flying children, the novel was a huge hit, especially with teen readers, and spawned a series of vastly popular fantasy adventures.

In addition to continuing his bestselling literary franchises, Patterson has also found time to co-author thrillers with other writers—including Peter de Jonge, Andrew Gross, Maxine Paetro, and Howard Roughan—and has even ventured into romance (Suzanne's Diary for Nicholas, Sam's Letters to Jennifer) and children's literature (santaKid). Writing at an astonishing pace, this prolific author has turned himself into a one-man publishing juggernaut, fulfilling his clearly stated ambition to become "the king of the page-turners."

Good To Know

Patterson's Suzanne's Diary For Nicholas was inspired by a diary his wife kept that tracked the development of their toddler son.

Two of Patterson's Alex Cross mysteries (Along Came a Spider and Kiss the Girls) have been turned into films starring Morgan Freeman; in 2007, a weekly television series premiered, based on the bestselling Women's Murder Club novels.

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    1. Hometown:
      Palm Beach, Florida
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 22, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      Newburgh, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., Manhattan College, 1969; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1971
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Sundays at Tiffany's
By James Patterson Gabrielle Charbonnet Little, Brown and Company

Copyright © 2008 James Patterson
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-316-01477-9



Chapter One

EVERY DETAIL of those Sunday afternoons is locked in my memory, but instead of explaining me and Michael right off, I'll start with the world's best, most luscious, and possibly most sinful ice cream sundae, as served at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City.

It was always the same: two fist- sized scoops of coffee ice cream, swirled with a river of hot fudge sauce, the kind that gets thicker, gooey and chewy, when it hits the ice cream. On top of that, real whipped cream. Even at eight years old, I could tell the difference between real whipped cream and the fake-o nondairy product you squirt from a can.

Across from me at my table in the Astor Court was Michael: hands down the handsomest man I knew, or have ever known, for that matter. Also, the nicest, the kindest, and probably the wisest.

That day his bright green eyes watched me gaze at the sundae with undisguised delight as the whitecoated waiter set it in front of me with tantalizing slowness.

For Michael, a clear glass bowl of melon balls and lemon sherbet. His ability to deny himself the pleasure of a sundae was something my child's brain couldn't wrap itself around.

"Thanks so much," Michael said, adding extreme politeness to his list of enviable qualities.

To which thewaiter said-not a word.

The Astor Court was the place to go for a fancy dessert at the St. Regis Hotel. That afternoon it was filled with important-looking people having important-looking conversations. In the background, two symphony-worthy violinists fiddled away as if this were Lincoln Center.

"Okay," Michael said. "Time to play the Jane- and- Michael game."

I clapped my hands together, my eyes lighting up.

Here's how it worked: One of us pointed to a table, and the other had to make up stuff about the people sitting there. The loser paid for dessert.

"Go," he said, pointing. I looked at the three teenage girls dressed in nearly identical pale yellow linen dresses.

Without hesitation, I said, "Debutantes. First season. Just graduated from high school. Maybe in Connecticut. Possibly-probably-Greenwich."

Michael tilted his head back and laughed. "You're definitely spending too much time around adults. Very good, though, Jane. Point for you."

"Okay," I said, gesturing toward another table. "That couple over there. The ones who look like the Cleavers in Leave It to Beaver. What's their story?"

The man was wearing a gray-and-blue-checked suit; the woman, a bright pink jacket with a green pleated skirt.

"Husband and wife from North Carolina," Michael rattled off easily. "Wealthy. Own a chain of tobacco shops. He's here on business. She came to do some shopping. Now he's telling her that he wants a divorce."

"Oh," I said, looking down at the table. I let out a deep breath, then took another spoonful of sundae and let the rich flavors unfold in my mouth. "Yeah, I guess everyone gets divorced."

Michael bit his lip. "Oh. Wait, Jane. I got it all wrong. He's not asking for a divorce. He's telling her that he has a surprise-he's made arrangements for them to go on a cruise. To Europe on the QE2. It's their second honeymoon."

"That's a much better story," I said, smiling. "You get a point. Excellent."

I looked down at my plate and saw that somehow my ice cream sundae had completely vanished. As it always did.

Michael looked around the room dramatically. "Here's one you won't get," he said.

He pointed to a man and a woman just two tables away.

I looked over.

The woman was about forty years old, well dressed, and stunningly pretty. You might have taken her for a movie actress. She wore a bright red designer dress and matching shoes and had a big black pocketbook. Everything about her said, Look at me!

The man she was with was younger, pale, and very thin. He was wearing a blue blazer and a patterned silk ascot, which I don't think anyone was wearing even back then. He waved his arms enthusiastically as he spoke.

"That's not funny," I said, but I couldn't help grinning and rolling my eyes.

Because, of course, the couple was my mother, Vivienne Margaux, the famous Broadway producer, and that year's celebrity hairdresser, Jason. Jason, the hothouse flower, who didn't have time for a last name.

I looked over at them again. One thing was for sure: My mom was beautiful enough to be an actress herself. Once, when I asked her why she hadn't become one, she said, "Honey, I don't want to ride the train. I want to drive the train."

Every Sunday afternoon when Michael and I had dessert at the St. Regis, my mother and a friend had dessert and coffee there too. That way she could gossip or complain or conduct business but still keep an eye on me, without actually having to be with me.

After the St. Regis, we would cap off our Sundays at Tiffany's. My mother loved diamonds, wore them everywhere, collected them the way other people collect crystal unicorns, or those weird ceramic Japanese cats with the one paw in the air.

Of course I was okay, those Sundays, because I had Michael for company. Michael, who was my best friend in the world, maybe my only friend, when I was eight years old.

My imaginary friend.

Chapter Two

I SNUGGLED CLOSER to Michael at our table. "Want to know something?" I asked. "It's kind of a bummer."

"What?" he asked.

"I think I know what my mother and Jason are talking about. It's Howard. I think Vivienne's tired of him. Out with the old, in with the new."

Howard was my stepfather, my mother's third husband. The third one I knew about, anyway.

Her first husband had been a tennis pro from Palm Beach. He'd lasted only a year.

Then had come Kenneth, my father. He'd done better than the tennis pro, lasting three years. He was really sweet, and I loved him, but he traveled a lot for business. Sometimes I felt as if he forgot about me. I'd heard my mother tell Jason that he'd been "spineless." She didn't know I'd overheard. She'd said, "He was a good-looking jellyfish of a man who will never amount to anything."

Howard had been around for two years now. He never traveled on business and didn't seem to have a job, other than helping Vivienne. He massaged her feet when she was tired, checked that her food was salt- free, and made sure that our car and driver were absolutely always on time.

"Why do you think that?" Michael asked.

"Little things," I said. "Like Vivienne used to buy him stuff all the time. Fancy loafers from Paul Stuart and ties from Bergdorf Goodman's. But she hasn't given him anything in ages. And, last night, she ate at home. Alone. With me. Howard wasn't even there."

"Where was he?" Michael asked. I could see the sympathy and concern in his eyes.

"I don't know. When I asked Vivienne, she just said, 'Who knows and who cares?'" I imitated my mother's voice, then shook my head. "Okay," I said. "New topic. Guess what day Tuesday is."

Michael tapped his chin a few times. "No idea."

"C'mon. You know perfectly well. You know, Michael. This isn't funny."

"Valentine's Day?"

"Stop it!" I told him, kicking him gently under the table. He grinned. "You know what Tuesday is. You have to. It's my birthday!"

"Oh, yeah. Wow, you're getting old, Jane."

I nodded. "I think my mother is having a party for me."

"Hmm," Michael said.

"Well, anyway, I don't care about a party, really. What I really want is a real, live puppy."

Michael nodded.

"Cat got your-" I started to say but then stopped in midsentence.

Out of the corner of my eye, I saw Vivienne signing the check. In a minute she and Jason would be standing over our table, hustling me off. This Sunday at the St. Regis was coming to a close. It had been another wonderful afternoon for me and Michael.

"Here she comes, Michael," I whispered. "Look invisible."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Sundays at Tiffany's by James Patterson Gabrielle Charbonnet Copyright © 2008 by James Patterson. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 763 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(364)

4 Star

(205)

3 Star

(94)

2 Star

(51)

1 Star

(49)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 767 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2009

    Fairytale for Big Girls

    This is a charming fairtale for a rainy afternoon. It proves wishes can still come true even if someone told you that such ideas were only for children. I loved it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2008

    Great start...disappointing ending

    It started out as the perfect page turning, easy to get into hard to put down romatic novel. I even bragged to three of my friends that I'd found the perfect Saturday at the beach read that they just HAD to pick up. Unfortunately I had to call my friends back and tell them not to bother because the plot took a major nose dive within the last five chapters. On the upside it's a really quick read so you don't invest a lot of time just to be disappointed at the end.

    7 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2008

    A Nice Trip From Reality

    I thought this book was a wonderful summer read. I enjoyed the characters and the subject. If you're looking for a deep romantic novel, this isn't it. But if you're looking for an enjoyable story with sweet romance and a little bit of drama, then dig in. I loved the ending!

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2010

    A Story of Unforgetting Love

    Sundays at Tiffany's us a heart- warming story showing a little girl's journey through her tough life in New York City. This book is filled with romance, neglection, happiness, and memorable characters that will have you turning the page until the very end. Sundays at Tiffnay's starts ub a little cafe where a little girl, Jane, spends he Sunday afternoons with her famous mother and her imaginary friend. She and Michael, the Imaginary friend, spend every moment they have together, doing whatever they can to keep busy. But for michael, having a job as an Imaginary friend, he must leave her when she turns 9. When her nineth birthday came he tells her the heart wrenching news and slowly fades from her memory. She wasn't supposed to remember anything, yet she does. Twenty years or so pass and they run into eachother again. They catch up and realize the true love they feel for eachother. They spend their days together, but somethings bothered him since the day her sa her again; she wasn't supposed to remember him. It's his job to figure out why she never forgot him and why he was there with her.
    The major theme in Sundays at Tiffany's was basically, love conquers all. Even though years have passed since the day they saw eachother, Michael and Jane still thought about eachother and still loved eachother, though the age difference was high. hen her mother hurt her as a little girl and twenty years later, Michael was still there to comfort her so she couldnt feel the pain and so she felt loved. when they saw eachother they still had the love for one one another as they did the last time they saw eachother, but it was more meaningful and deeper than they would have ever thought.
    James Patterson did a very good job portraying the characters' emotions and personalitites. He describes each characters feeling about what there going through so precisley. It feels as if you can personallly connect to everyone in the story. Patterson does a wonderful job including enough detail in each chapter, but includes a little twist at the end of each chapter, urging you to read on. What Patterson doesn't do is include a lot of background knowledge about the whole story line, so your jumping around trying to understand exactly what's happening. The book is split into to point of views, Jane and Michael, talking about what's going on in their eyes while on their journey together. Overall, he did a fantastic job telling the love story between an unforgettable friend, and how they try to survive the world together. He puts so much emotion and interest into these characters, it makes their story believable and memorable. Anyone who's interested in romance and quick but more challenging read will enjoy this book. Most teenage girls and young adults, even older couples may enjoy this romantic novel. It is like your modern- day fairy tale. If you liked the author's writing style, I would check out some of his other books, including other romance and many murder mystery books. Yet, Sundays at Tiffany's was truly a great and touching book.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

    Horrible read. Drags on forever

    Way out of character for James Patterson-must be more the style of Charbonnet. It's the only explanation I can come up with for such a horrible book with Patterson's name on it. The story is childish, boring, un-inspiring, and drags on forever. Do not recommend.

    3 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2009

    Loved it

    I loved this book. About halfway through I got a feeling in my gut that I wasn't going to like the ending but I love the way they finished this book. It's heartwarming, inspiring and gives you back the belief that true love does exist.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Sundays at Tiffany's

    The book was quite good! I found it to be a bit 'out there' in some parts, but really started to enjoy it once Michael came back into the picture. It was an easy read and I finished it in a couple days. I love that the chapters are nice and short! Sometimes I wish I could meet Jane and Michael( :

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2009

    Sunday at Tiffany's a true gem

    I'm not typically much into romance novels and typically prefer legal thrillers and such, but I found myself completely engrossed in this book. What a warm heartfelt book. It was a wonderful little escape from reality.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Pleasantly surprised!

    I was lent this book by a friend and I had my doubts (she is a die-hard Nicholas Sparks fan, while I gravitate toward romances of a smuttier variety) but I was pleasantly surprised! The story line was excellent and the characters are wonderful! The chapters are relatively short which offers many chances to put it down... if you can!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2009

    An easy, unrealistic escape

    James Patterson writes a love story with a twist. The book is a page turner, but is not realistic in any way. However, that's the beauty of the book. If you want a sweet, romantic escape, not with a complex plot; this is a good choice.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2009

    New James Patterson Fan!

    This was a beautiful, heart warming story! I loved it! First time reading James Patterson, I love it so much i have purchased several more of his books. easy to read and the story captures your heart!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Loved it!

    what a great feel good book. I lent it to my friends and they all loved it too. It's a wonderful escape from everyday life.
    Recommend!!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This contemporary romantic fantasy is an enchanting tale

    Born to affluence and fame, Jane Margaux grew up lonely with one exception. While her famous producer mother Broadway creates musicals and her father preferred spending quality time with his second wife in Nantucket, her only friend and companion is Michael, who provided her solace even if he was only imaginary. However, when she turned eight, Michael informs her he will no longer be with her though he will always be her best friend.<BR/><BR/>Over two decades later, Jane remains lonely even with a boyfriend and neurotic though she works for her mother. No one would believe she is Vivienne¿s daughter as she is treated scornfully and horrifically. As Jane produces her first play based on her childhood with Michael, he returns bringing light into Jane¿s dark life. They fall in love as each find their groove with one another; but Michael fears he will not be allowed to stay with his beloved as adults are not supposed to remember imaginary friends while she has never forgotten him especially since he left her once before.<BR/><BR/>This contemporary romantic fantasy is an enchanting tale in which Jane breaks the rules of imaginary friends by somehow always remembering her Michael. The story line effortlessly switches from preadolescence in which he is a sort of guardian big brother to her to and adult love story. Although the standard operating procedures of what an imaginary friend does and does not do and the laws of physics that govern the relationship between a child and their buddy are lacking so that the audience cannot fully appreciate the heroine¿s breaking the barrier, fans will enjoy it happened to Jane.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 2, 2010

    Perfect!

    Sundays at Tiffiny's was truly a wonderful book. It was very original and I loved reading it. I felt the connection between the two main characters was amazing. I would deffinatly read it again sometime and I suggest to only adults and mature people because of the language and certain "scenes."

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2010

    A good quiet weekend book.

    Aa touching story that allows the reader to wonder "what if"..... This is one of those books for a quiet weekend. It warms the heart with out taxing the brain or requiring the reader to watch their diet for a week. It is simply good reomanic escapism.

    This not your typlical Patterson. Fans might find the lack of suspence disappointing. Devotees of Patterson will find this a refreshing break from his typical writings. Refreshing.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Romantic, Charming, Heart Warming

    I throughly enjoyed this book, I finished it in 2 days. It is a very sweet story with an odd ending I must say. So much happens in the last 5 chapters and its almost rushed unlike the majority of the story. I liked the characters and the style of writing changing between characters point of view. Quick easy read!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great, touching story

    The idea that your childhood imaginary friend can actually come to life is different and appealing. Michael unexpectedly comes back into Jane's life when she's grown-up and provides companionship, comfort, and love. The story is sweet and charming and the two main characters are lovable. Set in New York City, you get the feel for the life of a city girl and some recognizable landmarks.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2009

    Softest candy you will ever read

    I took this on a 12 hour plane ride and it was fine but very weak and soft for Patterson.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Dreams can come true..

    An unrealistic love story that becomes true. This is a great beach book for those who want to escape reality and live in a true love story.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Escapism at its best...if you're looking for reality, skip this one.

    I'm a fan of the more romantic James Patterson. I picked this one up because I'm a fan of "Suzanne's Diary for Nicholas". Totally unbelievable, but just sometimes you have to do it just for the relaxation. I love the writing style and short chapters that allow you to put Patterson's books down, but you'll find yourself picking them right back up again. This is a great rainy days book to just get lost in.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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