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Sunflower Sal
     

Sunflower Sal

by Janet S. Anderson, Elizabeth Johns (Illustrator), Elizabeth Johns (Illustrator)
 

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"Sal desperately wants to make a quilt, but her big hands just don't seem to have the knack of doing such small, fussy work. What she is good at is raising sunflowers. . . . A late-summer climb to the top of Bare Hill reveals that the neat squares of fields and pasture below have been 'stitched together with sunflowers--Sal has made her quilt. It's a lovely story from

Overview

"Sal desperately wants to make a quilt, but her big hands just don't seem to have the knack of doing such small, fussy work. What she is good at is raising sunflowers. . . . A late-summer climb to the top of Bare Hill reveals that the neat squares of fields and pasture below have been 'stitched together with sunflowers--Sal has made her quilt. It's a lovely story from Anderson about finding one's true gifts, with sun-washed oil paintings in a palette of gold, brown, and green" ("Kirkus Review").

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Donna Freedman
A sweet and validating story for girls who may be a little taller or heavier than society thinks is acceptable. Sal is a big girl, and mostly that's okay: she can reach the best apples, shake the most nuts out of the hickory tree, and put the head on the tallest snowman. But her big hands make it hard to quilt with her beloved grandma. Her dad, who's proud of his "big girl," encourages her to plant sunflowers instead, which leads to the creation of a special kind of "quilt." The illustrations feature warm, homey earth tones, and the slightly oversized humans in the pictures reinforce that it's perfectly normal for some people to be bigger than others.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4Sal, a strapping farm girl, thinks it is her size that makes her unable to sew a quilt like her grandmother, but Gran finally convinces her: "It's just that your talent isn't sewing." Sal eventually finds her own ability as she discovers the pleasure of growing sunflowers; by the end of the story, she has made a living quilt of sorts by planting them around the edges of the fields and farmyard. The boldly primitive oil on canvas illustrations are just right for Gran's quilts and Sal's blossoms. Scenes of life on the farm are presented sometimes on bordered pages, sometimes on double-page spreads. The paintings are also a little exaggerated to match the stretches of realism in the story. The text and illustrations create an appealing setting for the theme of finding one's own way to make the world more beautiful.Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME
Kirkus Reviews
Sal desperately wants to make a quilt, but her big hands just don't seem to have the knack of doing such small, fussy work. What she is good at is raising sunflowers, hundreds and thousands of giant yellow blooms by the back door of the farmhouse, behind the garden, on either side of the lane, and all along the dusty roads. A late-summer climb to the top of Bare Hill reveals that the neat squares of fields and pasture below have been "stitched together with sunflowers"—Sal has made her quilt. It's a lovely story from Anderson (Going Through the Gate, p. 1106) about finding one's true gifts, with sun-washed oil paintings in a palette of (what else?) gold, brown, and green. Put this next to Barbara Cooney's Miss Rumphius (1982) and the Johnny Appleseed tales, about other characters whose horticultural labors of love transformed landscapes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807576625
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
08/15/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.28(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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