The Sunflower Sword

The Sunflower Sword

4.0 4
by Mark Sperring, Miriam Latimer
     
 

In a land filled with fire and smoke and endless fighting, where knights fight dragons, there lives a little knight who wants to be big like the others, and fight like the others, and have a sword like the others.

But his mother won't let him.

Instead of a sword, she gives him a sunflower, which, as it turns out, can be mightier than a sword.  See more details below

Overview

In a land filled with fire and smoke and endless fighting, where knights fight dragons, there lives a little knight who wants to be big like the others, and fight like the others, and have a sword like the others.

But his mother won't let him.

Instead of a sword, she gives him a sunflower, which, as it turns out, can be mightier than a sword.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—In this charming tale, an unnamed little knight with a colander on his head dreams of being big and brave enough to conquer the dragons who inhabit his "land filled with fire and smoke and endless fighting." He asks his mother for a sword. When she wonders why he wants one, he explains with a smile, "To whoosh and swoosh in the air." Instead of handing over a deadly weapon, she gives him a sunflower, and the intrepid lad resigns himself to pretending it is a sword. He climbs Dragon Hill whooshing and swooshing his sunflower, slaying imaginary dragons along the way. Suddenly he is confronted by the real thing. The fearsome monster spies the flower in the boy's hand and takes it from him, thinking the young knight wants to be friends. Soon all of the knights in the land are inspired to lay down their weapons, bringing peace to the community. The cheerful patchwork illustrations painted in bright, springtime colors add touches of humor to the story. The mother wears a rather modern floral print dress with a fashionable scarf around her neck, suggesting that the land of dragons and knights exists only in her son's vivid imagination. Children will appreciate the idea that fighting is not the best alternative and that an enemy can become a friend.—Linda L. Walkins, Mount Saint Joseph Academy, Brighton, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761374862
Publisher:
Andersen Press USA
Publication date:
01/28/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,246,260
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD750L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Customer Reviews

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Sunflower Sword 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Autumn2 More than 1 year ago
K picked this book up from our public library. Me and K both enjoyed this story. It has knights and dragons and of course that always makes for a great read right! You have a little knight who doesn't have a sword but a Sunflower that if you used your imagination which I think is great to do it can be anything. In this case it is a sword! When the little knight meets a dragon he knows what to do with this sunflower sword but the dragon thinks otherwise! The young knight shows that you don't have to fight dragons but yet become friends by giving them sunflowers! The story was great to read at bedtime and the pictures were done wonderfully and went with the story being told 
SherrieLM More than 1 year ago
My daughter is a "musketeer in training" and when we read this book, she absolutely LOVED it! I think my little four year old considered maybe there is more to being a "brave knight" than fighting.... Perhaps it takes more courage to find common ground (or beautiful sunflowers) with our "enemies."
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
The knights stood fast and fought as they were surrounded by dragons of every color, but there was one little knight who wanted to join in the fighting, "but his mother said he couldn't." She held fast to his shoulders and peered over his colander helmet as the battle raged. She wanted to know why he wanted to have a sword and when he said, "To whoosh and swoosh in the air," she smiled and went off to find one. The little knight's eyes grew wide and his mouth grew pouty when she came back with a sunflower sword, but he decided it would just have to do and "could pretend" it was a sword. The little night swooshed and whooshed the sunflower to see just what kind of sword he had and told his mother, "It won't be any good for fighting dragons." It would have to do because soon he'd be heading to Dragon Hill to do battle with imaginary dragons as they swirled around the hill. All of a sudden the wide-eyed little knight was surrounded by flames and smoke when a REAL dragon came through the trees. He stood fast and soon was on the back of the scaly dragon ready to do battle with his sunflower sword. Would the little knight be brave enough to slay this dragon? Would the sunflower sword . swoosh . whoosh . do the trick? This is a charming, imaginative story of a little knight who went into battle with a sunflower sword. Every youngster has a vivid imagination, but for this little knight it took a lot to believe that a sunflower sword could really slay a dragon. There was a certain panache and daring do about this little guy, even if his cowboy boots and colander helmet didn't quite match the seriousness of his imagined profession. The artwork was bright, colorful, and meshed perfectly with the tale. Quill says: If you have a little wanna-be dragon slayer you're going to love this book!