Sunlight on the Lawn

Overview


Sunlight on the Lawn brings to a close Beverley Nichols's delightful Merry Hall trilogy describing the renovation of his run-down Georgian mansion and its garden.
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Overview


Sunlight on the Lawn brings to a close Beverley Nichols's delightful Merry Hall trilogy describing the renovation of his run-down Georgian mansion and its garden.
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Editorial Reviews

Pacific Horticulture
"Be prepared. Beverley Nichols' garden books are part PG Wodehouse and part James Barrie — full of hilarious Jeeves-like characters and events, with moments of Peter Pan magic."
—Bob Cowden, Pacific Horticulture, Spring 2000
Choice
"First published in 1956 ... it still holds great charm."

Choice, April 1999

American Rhododendron Society Journal
"In his entertaining and inimitable manner, Beverly Nichols wraps up his trilogy on the renovation of Merry Hall and its garden."

—Peter Kendall, American Rhododendron Society Journal, Fall 2004

From the Publisher

"In his entertaining and inimitable manner, Beverly Nichols wraps up his trilogy on the renovation of Merry Hall and its garden."
—Peter Kendall, American Rhododendron Society Journal, Fall 2004
Booknews
Nichols 1899-1983 was a prolific writer whose corpus included a number of genuinely humorous and whimsical gardening books. This volume comprises the last in a trilogy recounting the story of his restoration of Merry Hall, a Georgian estate that he rescued from the wilderness following WWII. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780881924671
  • Publisher: Timber Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/1999
  • Series: Beverley Nichols Trilogy Series
  • Pages: 273
  • Sales rank: 633,595
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Beverley Nichols (1898–1983) was a prolific writer on subjects ranging from religion to politics and travel, in addition to authoring six novels, five detective mysteries, four children's stories, six autobiographies, and six plays. He is perhaps best remembered today for his gardening books. The first of them, Down the Garden Path, centered on his home and garden at Glatton and has been in print almost continuously since 1932. Merry Hall (1951) and its sequels Laughter on the Stairs (1953) and Sunlight on the Lawn (1956) document Nichols' travails in renovating a Georgian mansion and its gardens soon after the war. His final garden was at Sudbrook Cottage, which serves as the setting for Garden Open Today (1963) and Garden Open Tomorrow (1968). The progress of all three gardens was followed avidly by readers of his books and weekly magazine columns.
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Read an Excerpt


If you had been able to float over Meadowstream on a magic carpet you would have seen a patchwork of fields and woods, ribboned by winding lanes converging on the village green; and this patchwork would be spread between the downs to the south and the dark mass of Ladslove Hill to the west. You would also have seen, I regret to say, an advancing fringe of red brick villas, still distant, but coming near enough to spread a certain amount of alarm and despondency to the older residents. We will avert our eyes from them. They need never trouble us at Merry Hall, because we are grand enough to be surrounded by our own land, and in any case we have planted such vast quantities of evergreens that nothing short of the Empire State Building could ever cast an alien shadow over our privacy.

'What a peaceful place!' you might well say to yourself, as you peered over the edge of the magic carpet. 'How lucky are the inhabitants of this rural retreat! What spiritual calm must invest them ... what sweet thoughts must fill their minds!' How could you be expected to guess that Meadowstream, in reality, was not a peaceful place at all? Why should you suspect that it was torn by violent emotions and riven by passionate rivalries — that its inhabitants were constantly holding their breath, awaiting the outcome of a succession of rural dramas?

Such, however, was the case. There were no less than three of these dramas, mounting to a climax, on this last summer of the Oldfield regime.

There was the drama of Our Rose, and her sudden discovery that she had powers of spiritual healing and the awful effect that this discovery was to have on another of my neighbours, Miss Emily Kaye.

There was the drama of little Miss Mint and her monstrous tenants, the Stromens, who at this very moment were moving into her cottage, with results which not even the most pessimistic could have forecast.

And there was the drama of The Fence, which very nearly split Meadowstream into two warring camps.

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