Sunset Embrace

( 22 )

Overview

No woman on the trek to Texas was more mysterious than the russet-haired Lydia. No man was more proud than the rugged Ross Coleman. Both were running from the past--and to each other. But Lydia had vowed no man would ever touch her or take away her will. And Ross Coleman had pledged to remain true to the wife who had died giving birth to his son. Yet soon Lydia and Ross would be pulled into a maelstrom of danger and desire---unable to deny the storm of emotions gathering inside them---unable to stop the secrets ...
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Sunset Embrace

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Overview

No woman on the trek to Texas was more mysterious than the russet-haired Lydia. No man was more proud than the rugged Ross Coleman. Both were running from the past--and to each other. But Lydia had vowed no man would ever touch her or take away her will. And Ross Coleman had pledged to remain true to the wife who had died giving birth to his son. Yet soon Lydia and Ross would be pulled into a maelstrom of danger and desire---unable to deny the storm of emotions gathering inside them---unable to stop the secrets that would soon pit an enemy's deadly vengeance against the strength of a woman's love.

Russet-haired, sensuous Lydia and proud, dangerous Ross Coleman are both running from the past. But thrust together on a slow-moving wagon train, they will soon be pulled into a maelstrom of danger and desire. A sizzling romance reissued to coincide with Sandra Brown's new romance Mirror Image. Reissue.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446356855
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/28/1990
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 208,837
  • Product dimensions: 4.12 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.12 (d)

Meet the Author

Sandra Brown

Sandra Brown is the author of sixty New York Times bestsellers, including TOUGH CUSTOMER (2010), SMASH CUT (2009), SMOKE SCREEN (2008), PLAY DIRTY (2007), RICOCHET (2006), CHILL FACTOR (2005), WHITE HOT (2004), HELLO, DARKNESS (2003), THE CRUSH (2002), ENVY (2001), THE SWITCH (2000), THE ALIBI (1999), UNSPEAKABLE (1998) and FAT TUESDAY (1997), all of which have jumped onto the Times bestseller list in the number one to five spot. Brown now has over eighty million copies of her books in print worldwide, and her work has been translated into thirty-four languages.

Biography

In 1979, Sandra Brown lost her job at a television program and decided to give writing a try. She bought an armful of romance novels and writing books, set up a typewriter on a card table and wrote her first novel. Harlequin passed but Dell bit, and Brown was off and writing, publishing her works under an assortment of pseudonyms.

From such modest beginnings, Brown has evolved into multimillion publishing empire of one, the CEO of her own literary brand; she towers over the landscape of romantic fiction. Brown has used her growing clout to insist her publishers drop the bosom-and-biceps covers and has added more intricate subplots, suspense, and even unhappy endings to her work. The result: A near-constant presence on The New York Times bestsellers list. In 1992, she had three on the list at the same time, joining that exclusive club of Stephen King, Tom Clancy, J. K. Rowling, and Danielle Steel.

Her work in the mainstream realm has taken her readers into The White House, where the president's newborn dies mysteriously; the oil fields and bedrooms of a Dallas-like family dynasty; and the sexual complications surrounding an investigation into an evangelist's murder. Such inventions have made her a distinct presence in a crowded genre.

"Brown is perhaps best known now for her longer novels of romantic suspense. The basic outline for these stories has passionate love, lust, and violence playing out against a background of unraveling secrets and skeletons jumping out of family closets," wrote Barbara E. Kemp in the book Twentieth-Century Romance & Historical Writers . Kemp also praises Brown's sharp dialogue and richly detailed characters. "However, her greatest key to success is probably that she invites her readers into a fantasy world of passion, intrigue, and danger," she wrote. "They too can face the moral and emotional dilemmas of the heroine, safe in the knowledge that justice and love will prevail."

Critics give her points for nimble storytelling but are cooler to her "serviceable prose," in the words of one Publishers Weekly reviewer. Still, when writing a crack page-turner, the plot's the thing. A 1992 New York Times review placed Brown among a group of a writers "who have mastered the art of the slow tease."

Staggeringly prolific, Brown found her writing pace ground to a halt when she was given a different assignment. A magazine had asked her for an autobiographical piece, and it took her months to complete. Her life in the suburbs, though personally fulfilling, was nonetheless blander than fiction. That may be why she dives into her fiction writing with such workhorse gusto. "I love being the bad guy," she told Publishers Weekly in 1995, "simply because I was always so responsible, so predictable growing up. I made straight A's and never got into any trouble, and I still impose those standards on myself. So writing is my chance to escape and become the sleaziest, scummiest role."

When she started writing, her goal was always to break out of the parameters of romance. After about 45 romances, the woman who counts Tennessee Williams and Taylor Caldwell among her influences told The New York Times that felt she had reached a plateau. In fact, she doesn't even look at her books as romances anymore. "I think of my books now as suspense novels, usually with a love story incorporated," she said. "They're absolutely a lot harder to write than romances. They take more plotting and real character development. Each book is a stretch for me, and I try something interesting each time that males will like as well as women."

Good To Know

  • "I hate to exercise and only do so because I absolutely must."

  • "I love to eat and my favorite foods are all bad for the body. Fried chicken and gravy, TexMex, red meat (hey, I'm from Texas!). My only saving grace is that I'm not that fond of sweets. Salty is my thing. Chocolate cake and ice cream I can skip. But a bag of Fritos. . ."

  • "It takes me a long time to go to sleep, usually because I read in bed and hate to put down the book. But when I do nod off, I'm a champion sleeper. I can easily do eight or nine hours a night."

  • "My worst "thing" is mean-spirited people. People who deliberately belittle or embarrass someone really irk me. The people I admire most are the ones who find something good about even the most undesirable individual. That was a quality my mother had, the one I hope most to emulate."

  • "I have a fear of gravity. Recently my whole family went to Belize. We had several adventures. We tubed a river through miles of cave, wearing head lamps so we'd have illumination. No problem. I scaled Mayan ruins. I rode horseback (on a monster named Al Capone) through the rain forest. No problem. But I couldn't zip line. Even though my five-year-old grandsons did it with glee, I just couldn't make that leap."

  • "I and my husband are huge fans of Jeopardy! We never miss it if we can help it. Does that make us complete dorks?"

  • Read More Show Less
      1. Also Known As:
        Laura Jordan, Rachel Ryan and Erin St. Claire
      2. Hometown:
        Arlington, TX
      1. Date of Birth:
        March 12, 1948
      2. Place of Birth:
        Waco, Texas
      1. Education:
        Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, Texas Christian University, 2008
      2. Website:

    Read an Excerpt

    Sunset Embrace


    By Sandra Brown

    Warner Books

    Copyright © 1999 Sandra Brown
    All right reserved.

    ISBN: 0-446-35685-9


    Chapter One

    Why has God made it so painful to die? the young woman wondered.

    She gripped her distended abdomen as another pain tore through her lower body and shimmied down her thighs. When it was over, she panted laboriously, like a wounded animal, trying to garner strength for the next assault, which she knew would seize her within minutes. Undoubtedly it would come, because she didn't think she would be allowed to die before the baby was born.

    She shivered convulsively. The rain was cold, each drop a tiny needle that pricked her skin, and it had soaked through the tattered dress and the few undergarments she had managed to hold together with clumsy knots. The rags clung to her like a damp shroud, a cloying weight that anchored her to the marshy ground as securely as did the relentless pain. She was chilled to the bone, but perspiration had clammily glazed her skin after endless hours of painful labor.

    When had it begun? Last night just after sunset. Through the night, the ache in the lower part of her back had intensified until it crawled farther around her middle to twist her womb between angry fists. Cloud-obscured skies made it difficult to determine the time of day, but she guessed it to be midmorning by now.

    She concentrated on the leafy pattern of the tree limbs against the gray sky overhead as the next contraction wrung her insides. The rainy clouds scuttled by, heedless of the woman barely twenty years old lying alone in the Tennessee wilderness, sing birth to a being she didn't want to think of as a baby, even as human.

    She turned her cheek sideways into her bed of sodden, rotted leaves, remnants of last fall, and let her tears mingle with the rain. Her baby had been conceived out of shame and humiliation and deserved no happier occasion than this to be born.

    "Sweet Jesus, let me die now," she prayed as she felt another abdominal upheaval rolling through her. Like the summer thunder, it rumbled inside her, gaining impetus before crashing against the walls of her body, just as the thunder seemed to collide with the mountainsides. The pain echoed through her as the thunderclap reverberated through the foothills.

    Last evening she had tried to ignore the pains and had kept walking. When water had gushed between her thighs, she had been forced to lie down. She hadn't wanted to stop. Each day meant another few miles' distance between her and the body that surely had been discovered by now. She hoped it would decay and never be found, but really didn't expect such a piece of luck.

    This merciless pain she was suffering now was no doubt Gods punishment for being glad to see one of His creatures die. That, and her wanting no part of the life she had carried in her womb for nine months. Despite the sinfulness of it, she prayed that she would never see the life struggling so hard to be expelled from her body. She prayed that she would die first.

    The next seizure was the most vicious of all and brought her to a half-sitting position. Last night, when her bloomers had been ruined by the pinkish flood, she had taken them off and cast them aside. Now she picked the garment up and mopped her rain- and sweat-soaked face with it. She trembled uncontrollably, as much out of fear as pain. She had felt herself tearing with that last rebellion of her body. Gathering the frayed hem of her dress and the cobwebby remains of her petticoat up over her raised knees, she tentatively lowered her hand between her legs and touched the spot.

    "Ohhh ..." she whimpered, and began to weep. She was open, stretched wide. Her fingertips had touched the babe's head. Her hand came away covered with blood and slime. Her mouth opened with terror, but the sound that issued out was a piercing wail of agony as her body strained and squeezed, trying to eliminate the being that had become foreign matter after being snugly harbored for nine months.

    She levered herself up on her elbows, spread her thighs wide, and bore down with the pressure. Blood pounded against her eardrums and behind eyes that were squeezed shut. Her jaws ached from clenching them, her lips were peeled back into a gruesome mask. During a brief respite, she huffed precious air in and out of her lungs. Then the pain came again. And again.

    She screamed, expending the last of her energy on one final thrust, funneling all her body's weight to that one narrow place that rent in two.

    And then she was free of it.

    She fell back exhausted, gulping air and grateful now for the raindrops that coolly bathed her face. There was no sound in the thick forest save for the bellowslike heaving of her lungs and the rain dripping heavily. The absence of sound was eerie, startling, strange. There had been no bursting cry of life from the baby she had just birthed, no movement.

    Disregarding her earlier prayer, she struggled to sit up again and moved her long skirt aside. Animal sounds of grief and misery tripped over her bruised lips when she saw the infant, little more than a ball of bluish flesh, Iyin, e dead between her thighs without ever having known life. The cord that had nourished it had been its instrument of death. The ropy tissue was wound tightly around the baby's throat. Its face was pinched. It had taken a suicidal plunge into the world. The girl wondered if it had chosen to die, instinctively knowing that it would be despised even by its mother, preferring death to a life of degradation.

    "At Least, little one, you didn't have to suffer life," she whispered.

    She fell back onto the spongy ground and stared sightlessly at the weeping sky, knowing that she was fevered and probably delirious, and that thoughts about babies killing themselves in the womb were crazy. But it made her feel better to think that her baby hadn't wanted to live any more than she had wanted it to, that it had wanted to die just as she did now.

    She should pray for forgiveness at being glad for her own infant's death, but she was too tired. Surely God would understand. It had been He, after all, who had afflicted her with such pain. Didn't she deserve to rest now?

    Her eyes closed against the rain that poured over her face like a healing balm. She couldn't remember a time when she had known this kind of peace. She welcomed it.

    Now she could die.

    "You reckon she's dead?" the young voice croaked hoarsely.

    "I don't know," a slightly older voice whispered back. Poke her and see."

    "I ain't a'gonna poke her. You poke her."

    The tall, rangy boy knelt on bony knees next to the prone, soil figure. Carefully, as he had been taught by his pa, he propped his rifie, barrel up, against the tree trunk. His hands twitched nervously as he stretched them toward the girl.

    "You're scared, ain'tcha?" the younger boy challenged.

    "No, I ain't scared," the older hissed back. Having to prove it, he extended his index finger and placed it next to the girl's upper lip, not quite touching her. "She's breathing, he said in relief. "She ain't dead."

    "What do you reckon ... godamighty, Bubba, there's blood a'coming from under her dress."

    Reflexively Bubba jumped back. His brother Luke was right. A trickle of blood was forming a crimson pool beneath the hem of her dress, which barely covered her knees. She wasn't wearing stockings and the leather of her shoes was cracked and peeling. The laces had been knotted together after numerous breaks.

    "You figure she's been gunshot or something? Maybe we ought to look-"

    "I know, I know," Bubba said impatiently. "Keep your damn trap shut."

    "I'm gonna tell Ma you're cussin-"

    "Shut up!" Bubba whirled around to stare down his younger brother. "I'll tell her you peed in old lady Watkin's wash water after she got on to you 'bout makin' too much noise around the camp." Luke was properly cowed, and Bubba turned back to the girl. Gingerly, and disbelieving he had actually wanted to go hunting that morning, he lifted the hem of her ratty brown dress. "Hellfire," he shrieked, dropping the skirt and jumping to his feet. Unfortunately, the soiled cloth didn't fall back to cover the lifeless form lying between the girl's slender thighs. Both boys stared in horror at the dead infant. Luke made a strange sound in his throat.

    "You gonna puke?" Bubba asked.

    "No." Luke swallowed hard. "I don't think," he said with less assurance.

    "Go get Ma. Pa, too. He'll have to carry her back to the wagon. Can you find your way back?"

    "'Course," Luke said scornfully.

    "Then get going She could still die, ya know."

    Luke cocked his head to one side and studied the young woman's pale face. "She's right fetchin' to look at. You gonna touch her any more while I'm gone?"

    "Get goin'!" Bubba yelled, facing his brother with a threatening stance.

    Luke thrashed his way noisily through the trees until he could safely call back a taunt. "I'll know if you look at somethin you ain't supposed to. And I'll tell Ma."

    Bubba Langston picked up a pinecone and hurled it at his brother, younger by two years. It fell short of its mark and Luke scampered away. When he was out of sight Bubba knelt down beside the girl. He gnawed his lower lip before looking at the dead baby once again. Then, using only the tips of his index finger and thumb, he lifted the hem of her skirt and moved it to cover up the baby.

    Sweat beaded his forehead, but he felt better when he couldn't see the baby anymore. "Lady," he whispered softly.

    "Hey, lady, can you hear me?" Fearfully he nudged her shoulder. She moaned and tossed her head to one side, then back again.

    He had never seen such a head of hair on a person before. Even littered with twigs and leaves and damp with rain it was right pretty curly and sort of wild looking. The color wasn't like any he had ever seen before either. Not quite red and not quite brown, but somewhere in between.

    He took off the canteen suspended around his neck by a leather thong and uncapped it. "Lady, you want a drink?" Bravely, he pressed the metal spout to her flaccid lips and poured a small amount over them. Her tongue came out to lick up the moisture.

    Bubba watched, fascinated, as her eyes fluttered open to gaze up at him vaguely. The girl saw a wide-eyed boy of about sixteen bending anxiously over her. His shock of hair was so light it was almost white. Was he an angel? Was she in heaven? If so, it was disappointingly like earth. The same sky, the same trees, the rain-laden forest. The same pain between her thighs. She wasn't dead yet! No, no, boy, go away. I want to die. She closed her eyes again and knew no more.

    Afraid for the young woman's life, and feeling helpless, Bubba sank to the damp ground under the tree. His eyes never left her face until he heard the commotion of Ma and Pa pushing through the dense undergrowth in the full, lush bloom of early summer.

    "What's all this Luke was blabbing about a girl, son?" Zeke Langston asked his eldest child.

    "See, I told you, Ma, Pa," Luke said excitedly, pointing a finger. "There she be."

    "Get out of my way, all of you, and let me see to this poor girl." Ma impatiently shoved the men aside and squatted down heavily beside the girl. First she brushed aside the damp hair clinging to the wan cheeks. "Right comely, ain't she? Wonder what in tarnation she's doing out here all alone."

    "There's a babe, Ma."

    Ma Langston looked up at Bubba, then at her husband, jerking her head in a silent signal that he distract the boys. When their backs were turned, Ma raised the dress to the girl's lap. She had seen worse, but this sight was grim enough. "Lord have mercy," she muttered. "Zeke, give me a hand here. You boys run on back to the wagon and tell Anabeth to fix a pallet up proper. Get a good fire goin and put a kettle to boilin'."

    Disappointed that they were going to miss the most interesting part of the adventure, they objected in unison. "But Ma-"

    "Git, I said." Rather than incur their mother's wrath, which both had felt at the other end of a strop, they shuffled off toward the wagon train that was taking Sunday off to rest

    "She's in a bad way, ain't she?" Zeke asked, crouching down beside his wife.

    "Yep. First thing is to get the afterbirth out. She may die of the poison anyway.'

    Silently they worked over the unconscious girl. What should I do with this, Ma?" Zeke asked. He had wrapped nature's debris along with the dead infant in a knapsack and had bundled it tightly.

    "Bury it. I doubt she'll be in any condition to visit a grave for several days. Mark the spot in case she wants to come back to see it."

    "I'll put a boulder over it so the animals wont get to its Zeke said solemnly and began to scoop out a shallow grave with the small spade he had brought with him. "How's the girl?" he asked when he was done, wiping his hands on a bandanna handkerchief.

    "Still bleeding, but I've got her packed tight. We've done all we can do here. Can you carry her?"

    "If you can help hoist her up."

    The girl came to life and protested, flailing her arms weakly when Zeke hooked her under the knees and behind her back and lifted her to his thin chest. Then the slender limbs fell away and she went lifeless again. Her throat arched as her head fell back over his arm.

    "Aint her hair funny looking though," Zeke commented, not unkindly.

    "Can't say I ever seen any that color before," Ma replied absently as she picked up the things they had brought with them. "We'd best hurry. It's startin' to rain again."

    * * *

    The place between her thighs burned. Her throat was scratchy and sore She felt hot and achy all over Yet there was a pervading sense of comfort surrounding her. She was dry and warm. Hid she made it to heaven after all? Had the towheaded boy left her alone to die? Was that why she felt so safe and peaceful? But in heaven one wasn't supposed to know pain, and she was hurting.

    She pried her eyes open. A white canvas ceiling curved above he; A lantern was burning low on a box near the pallet on which she was lying. She stretched her legs as much as the aching between them would allow, acquainting herself with the soft bed. Her feet and legs were naked, but she had been dressed in a white nightgown. Her hands moved restlessly over her body and she wondered why she felt so strange. Tlen she realized that her stomach was flat.

    It all came back to her then in a wave of terrible memories. The fear, the pain, the horror of seeing the dead infant lying blue and cold between her legs. Tears pooled in her eyes.

    "There, there, you ain't gonna start that cryin' again are you? You bees cryin' off and on in your sleep for hours."

    The fingers that whisked the tears from her cheek were large, work-rough, and red in the soft glow of the lamp, but they felt good or her face. So did the voice that fell, full of gentle concern, in her ears. "Here, you ready for some of this broth? Made it from one of the rabbits the boys got this mornin' before they found you."

    Continues...


    Excerpted from Sunset Embrace by Sandra Brown Copyright © 1999 by Sandra Brown. Excerpted by permission.
    All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
    Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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    Table of Contents

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    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 5
    ( 22 )
    Rating Distribution

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    (19)

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    (2)

    3 Star

    (1)

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
    • Posted August 5, 2014

      more from this reviewer

      Reviewed by Anne Boling for Readers' Favorite Sunset Embrace by

      Reviewed by Anne Boling for Readers' Favorite

      Sunset Embrace by author Sandra Brown proves why her name is well known to fans of romance. This is one of her best tales. It is a historical romance. Lydia gives birth to her son alone in the woods; her only prayer is for their death. The child is still-born and Lydia is on the verge of death when the Langtry boys find her. Ma Langtry nurses the young woman back to health. Ross Coleman’s wife has died giving birth to their son and now that child is on the verge of death. Lydia’s breasts are ripe with mother’s milk and the infant is hungry. To Ma Langtry it is a simple decision, Lydia must nurse the infant. Despite Ross Coleman’s objections, Ma has her way and the infant and young woman form an instant bond. 

      Sunset Embrace is a riveting romance by Sandra Brown. My copy is an audio format read by Ellen Archer. Her voice is perfect for this endeavor. The setting for this romance is the 1870s on a wagon train heading west. Romance between Ross and Lydia was inevitable, however, that did not lessen the delight in watching it develop. This is a character-driven tale. I enjoyed getting to know the characters but I think my favorite was Ma Langtry. This historical western romance is also filled with humor. I loved the way Ma Langtry managed to handle the old bitty that was always butting into everyone’s business. This is the first book in the series; the title of the second book is Another Dawn.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted January 2, 2014

      Love it

      Great book

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted August 30, 2009

      Typical Early Sandra Brown

      The plot line was riveting! I was unable to put the book down until it was finished. I would recommend this book to any Historical Romance reader.

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    • Posted May 15, 2009

      more from this reviewer

      I Also Recommend:

      Vivid Characters

      This story was so good that I need some time before I start another book. I am just not ready to let go of this story and the characters.
      Sandra Brown fleshed out her characters beautifully. I loved the sexual attraction between Lydia and Ross. The storyline was wonderful and will stay with me for a long time.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 30, 2008

      Okay

      I read Another Dawn first and really loved it. This one was a bit too violent for me. I just don't enjoy reading about rape.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 14, 2006

      One of my favorites!

      This was a great book. I could almost feel the chemistry between Ross and Lydia. Plus, the fact that (Bubba) Jake was in love with Lydia made the sequel (Another Dawn) so much better.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 1, 2006

      Great Read

      This is one of my favorite SB books. I enjoyed how the relationship between Ross and Lydia developed into love. I think a lot of people can identify w/Lydia's situation. She experienced a number of unspeakable acts at the hands of people who were supposed to love her. But she persevered even when she 'thought' she'd given up. She kept going. I enjoyed this book. Highly recommend.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted August 7, 2005

      Full of passionate desire

      This was the first Sandra Brown book that I ever read and it was everything I thought it would be and more. The passion between Ross and Lydia was wonderfully written and shown by their thoughts towards each other, many Ross' thoughts for Lydia

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted August 17, 2004

      Great!

      I read this after Another Dawn. I know understand the love between Ross and Lydia and Lydia and Bubba (Jake). A great read.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted August 22, 2003

      Excellent

      I am so glad that I read this book. The characters had a lot of depth, even some of the subcharacters. This book was emotional and sweet. I can't wait to read 'Another Dawn'.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 29, 2003

      Best of the Crop

      I have read every book Sandra Brown has on the market and this one is by far the best. It is a western period piece with believable characters you truly care about. The story truly captures the readers undivided attention. So much so, that I was compelled to order it again along with the sequel Another Dawn. Happy Reading!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 29, 2003

      Wow!

      I was very surprised when I read this book. I have read several books by Sandra Brown and I have loved them all. This book though had much more depth and more of an intriguing plot. It really had you hanging on the edge of your seat. It was very emotional and romantic. I just started reading Another Dawn and it's great reading about the future of the characters in this book. It was a wonderful story.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 10, 2003

      good book

      I didn't enjoy this book as much as Sandra Brown's other historical romance, 'Hidden Fires', but this book has a nice good plot. The characters were well-developed. The only major problem I had was when Lydia clearly said no over and over, but Ross still continued on. SB only wrote from Ross' point of view. However, after the fact, Lydia was thinking how much she loved what Ross did, but I don't understand why she could love it when it was clearly rape. If Lydia had enjoyed it, then SB should have wrote what Lydia was feeling at the time it was happening but she didn't. That part was disturbing. Apart from that, the love story was well-written and I'm glad SB wrote a sequel.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted November 22, 2002

      the GREATEST

      THIS BOOK WAS ONE OF THE BEST I HAVE EVER READ AND IT SHOWED PASSION AND LOVE AND I ENJOYED READING IT VERY MUCH

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    • Anonymous

      Posted September 23, 2002

      Awesome book!!!

      Wow! I bought this book by chance. I cannot believe I was so lucky to have "stumbled" upon such a wonderful, romantic, exciting, intriguing novel!! I read it over the weekend and I can't stop thinking about it! I was so caught up in it and with Ms. Brown's descriptive writing, I had a hard time "snapping out of it"--back into reality. The characters become so real! I cannot wait to read more Sandra Brown novels!

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 26, 2001

      The Greatest Romance!

      This book is the cream of the crop! Sunset Embrace is undoubtedly the best novel of Sandra Brown. It has romance, suspense, and laughter. The main characters are Lydia and Ross. Lydia is absolutely entrancing and Ross is twice as better. This book is for anyone and everyone. Luckily, the cost of my treaure was a steal. I was browsing through my library. I had read one of Brown's other books and was looking for more titles. I spotted Sunset Embrace on a book shelf. It was on sale for only a QUARTER! I bought the book that afternoon and began reading it that night. Six o'clock in the morning my undaunted eyes read the last page. I couldn't put it down. The setting was so capturing, the lines so explicit, and the characters hold you in the palm of their hands. A must have for anyone human.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted January 11, 2001

      Heart stopping

      I loved his book. Lydia was an extremelly abused girl, who always wanted better, and knew she didn't have a chance. Untill she met and then was forced to marry Ross Coleman. Ross had a shady past life and resented any reminders of it. Unfortunally, Lydia did. They fight and struggle to come to terms with each other, and in between there is mystery, murder and intrigue. The sequel to this book is Another Dawn, and it is as well written and intriguing as this one.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted April 26, 2000

      THIS IS A VERY GOOD BOOK

      I REALLY LOVE THIS BOOK , BUT I WASN'T IMPRESSED WITH HER SEQUEL ANOTHER DAWN AT ALL

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    • Anonymous

      Posted December 28, 1999

      WOW!

      This book will keep you reading for hrs and the sequal is even better. This is one of Sandra Browns best books. The woman is AMAZING! Keep em' coming~!

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    • Anonymous

      Posted September 19, 2009

      No text was provided for this review.

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