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Super Crunchers: How Thinking by Numbers Is the New Way to Be Smart
     

Super Crunchers: How Thinking by Numbers Is the New Way to Be Smart

3.9 15
by Ian Ayres
 

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ISBN-10: 0553805401

ISBN-13: 2900553805405

Pub. Date: 08/28/2007

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Why would a casino try and stop you from losing? How can a mathematical formula find your future spouse? Would you know if a statistical analysis blackballed you from a job you wanted? Today, number crunching affects your life in ways you might never imagine. In this lively and groundbreaking new book, economist Ian Ayres shows how today's best and brightest

Overview

Why would a casino try and stop you from losing? How can a mathematical formula find your future spouse? Would you know if a statistical analysis blackballed you from a job you wanted? Today, number crunching affects your life in ways you might never imagine. In this lively and groundbreaking new book, economist Ian Ayres shows how today's best and brightest organizations are analyzing massive databases at lightening speed to provide greater insights into human behavior. They are the Super Crunchers. From internet sites like Google and Amazon that know your tastes better than you do, to a physician's diagnosis and your child's education, to boardrooms and government agencies, this new breed of decision makers are calling the shots. And they are delivering staggeringly accurate results. How can a football coach evaluate a player without ever seeing him play? Want to know whether the price of an airline ticket will go up or down before you buy? How can a formula outpredict wine ex...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900553805405
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/2007
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
272

Table of Contents


Introduction: The Rise of the Super Crunchers     1
Who's Doing Your Thinking for You?     19
Creating Your Own Data with the Flip of a Coin     46
Government by Chance     64
How Should Physicians Treat Evidence-Based Medicine?     81
Experts Versus Equations     103
Why Now?     129
Are We Having Fun Yet?     156
The Future of Intuition (and Expertise)     192
Acknowledgments     219
Notes     221
Index     249

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Super Crunchers: How Thinking by Numbers Is the New Way to Be Smart 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just look at the first chapter, where Ian Ayres touts his research on lojack devices, There is no discussion why almost all the insurance companies oppose giving any discount on the devices being installed. Presumably there are too few purchases of the device because if I hide a lojack on my car, even those without lojack benefit because car theives can't tell if a car is protected before they take it. Even with free-riding problems, if people got their cars back in generally one piece, why shouldn't the insurance companies want to give some discount? If there is a free-riding problem, it could be solved by car companies putting the device on all their cars. For example, if Porche put lojacks on its cars, Porche is protected without any beneficial spillover for others. Yet, no one 'not Porche, BMW, Cadillac, etc.' follows this policy. Couldn't Ayres discuss these problems? Couldn't he even mention them? What about the empirical work that confirms these car or insurance companies might not be as stupid as Ayres claims that they are? If he has a response, why not even mention these problems? He touts research reportedly showing that more abortion reduces crime, but he fails to note that if one actually did what the authors said should be done to conduct the tests, the effect went away 'see 'Abortion, crime and econometrics.' Economist Magazine, December 1, 2005'. Again, why not mention these problems? Other parts of the book also have problems. Ayres' empirical work on discrimination has also been extensively criticized, but no one would ever know from his discussion about these problems. The book would have given readers a better feel for what empirical work entails if instead of just making accertions about findings 'even when those findings have been proven to be wrong', he had spent even a little time showing how people learn from these debates over his research. A book touting the importance of empirical work would gain some credibility if Ayres acknowledged the objections raised to his and his friend's work and explained why their results still held. The personal attacks that Ayres makes in the book are also filled with inaccuracies
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When he/she is revealed to be the new companion i call dibs!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yo
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is she?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The second Doctor Whooves turns around, the Angel Statue moves....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yes. Then my boyfriend was erased by the crack in my wall... and now I'm not really.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wut
Seghetto More than 1 year ago
This was a quick read, but it was a fun read. Professor Ayres is a great writer (despite the hubbub with the plagiarism). I have a background in economics so I have a bit better than average grasp of the subject that he explored. The applications of data mining  are many, yet we still have to make decisions for ourselves and advertising will never be perfect. Data mining is fetishized now and people  expect big data to solve all our problems. This book doesn't take much of a critical approach, more of a hey look this is cool approach.
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dhweinflash More than 1 year ago
This book takes off the the other left off.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book chronicles how data-driven decision making is changing marketing, sports, government policy, entertainment and other industries. This will influence how we purchase products ,services, set policy, and affect critical functions of decison makers. It is written in laymans terms and is an eye opener for everyone. I finished it in 3 days because it was so compelling