Superman: The Complate History

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The super-powered trilogy that captured the world's greatest superhero triumvirate of all time is now available in paperback. Relive the adventures of Krypton's favorite son inside and outside the comic book world in Superman: The Complete History. Uncover the Caped Crusader's mysterious real-world origin and his evolution into a hugely successful TV and movie franchise in Batman: The Complete History. Follow the Amazon Princess as she evolves from curiosity to feminist icon in the Eisner Awardwinning Wonder ...

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Overview

The super-powered trilogy that captured the world's greatest superhero triumvirate of all time is now available in paperback. Relive the adventures of Krypton's favorite son inside and outside the comic book world in Superman: The Complete History. Uncover the Caped Crusader's mysterious real-world origin and his evolution into a hugely successful TV and movie franchise in Batman: The Complete History. Follow the Amazon Princess as she evolves from curiosity to feminist icon in the Eisner Awardwinning Wonder Woman: The Complete History. Each book is filled with enough archival comic book art, photographs, and in-depth history to satisfy the most demanding fan—and is now priced to appeal to the most casual reader.

Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and all related characters, names, and indicia are trademarks of DC Comics 2004.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Superman turned 60 in 1998, and the old boy's not looking bad at all for his age. To celebrate the Man of Steel's six decades of fighting for truth, justice, and the American Way, award-winning author and comic book expert Les Daniels has written Superman: The Complete History. Lavishly illustrated (with more than 200 photographs of comic book art, character designs, memorabilia, toys, and scenes from movie and television dramatizations of Superman's exploits) and filled with little-known facts about the big guy's life and career (did you know that, in his first incarnation, Superman was evil?), this wonderful volume is a can't-miss gift for boys (and girls) of all ages.
From the Publisher
These days we devour super-sized meals, ogle strutting supermodels and experiment with superconductivity. But once upon a time there were only superheroes. Murmur their names, and from out of memory's deep emerge lazy summer afternoons spent on covered porches with a bottle of Orange Crush and a bag of Fritos, weekly bike rides to the revolving wire racks in corner drug stores and, of course, our increasingly daring leaps, from picnic tables and brick fireplaces, with an old sheet fluttering from 9-year-old shoulders: "I can fly, I can fly." And we could — if only during that moment when we flexed our knees and pushed off into the air. Then, for one blissful second, we were commensurate with our dreams.

But, ah, those names, how they thrilled and fed our imaginations: the Flash, Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Aqua-Man and Hawkman, the Mighty Thor, and a little later the Silver Surfer, Spiderman and the X-Men. To the ignorant eyes of parents, our carefully tended stacks of 20, 50 or 200 issues of Action Comics, World's Finest, Detective Comics, Marvel Comics and so many others merely appeared to tell the same story, again and yet again: A gaudily costumed crime fighter battles a seemingly unbeatable enemy — sometimes the oddly loquacious alien from another planet or dimension, sometimes the white-coated mad scientist with his destructo-ray, often (and best of all) the monstrous result of some laboratory experiment gone horribly wrong.

Never such innocence again. Nowadays, comics have grown up and taken steroids: They are swarthy, mean, perverse, complex, adult. They even require specialized stores — like X-rated videos — and aspire to literature. "Graphic novels" can be intricate and wonderful — ask any student of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman or look at the pastiche brilliance of Alan Moore's The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen — but they would likely frighten or puzzle the children who lingered for hours over the early adventures of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman.

Three oversized histories now document the life and times of these most durable of all the comic-book legends. Les Daniels's cleanly written text reveals not only the artistic, business and marketing decisions that have made Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman recognizable round the world, but also the ways in which each of their comics differs from the others in style and tone.

Superman's adventures, for instance, were nearly always laced with humor and frequently relied on slightly screwball situations: For instance, Mr. Mxyzptlk — the impish troublemaker from the future — and Lois Lane's niece Susie Tompkins generally treated the Man of Steel as either an amusing buffoon or a playtime doll. Bizzarro — the simple-minded partial clone of Superman, who resembled a crystallized Frankenstein's monster — provoked endless chaos without being truly threatening. The entire reporting cast of the Daily Planet often tended to be exploited just for laughs: wide-eyed Jimmy Olsen, love-struck Lois Lane, even gruff editor Perry White with his favorite ejaculation, "Great Caesar's ghost!"

By contrast, Batman dealt with obsession in all its forms (a theme underscored in Tim Burton's two Batman films). Bruce Wayne transforms himself into a caped crusader to avenge the brutal death of his parents. But his opponents are even more seriously damaged individuals, usually driven to crime by psychological trauma: the Joker, who yearns to be acclaimed the world's greatest comedian; Two-Face, who struggles with a Jekyll-and-Hyde personality after his disfigurement; Cat-Woman, a mousy secretary who escapes repression by releasing her inner tigress.

Wonder Woman is, of course, the supreme avatar of that particular myth. The ludicrously bespectacled Diana Prince is actually an Amazon princess, at ease with her physical strength and beauty. She grew up in a world — Paradise Island — where sisterhood was truly powerful (and telepathic to boot). As a result, she pr

Library Journal
Fans of the Man of Steel, students of popular culture, and budding artists and actors will be swept up by this liberally illustrated and well-researched book about America's prototype superhero. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780811842310
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC
  • Publication date: 1/29/2004
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 8.12 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Les Daniels is a renowned comic book expert. He's the author of DC Comics: Sixty Years of the World's Favorite Comic Book Heroes. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

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Table of Contents

Creation 10
Explosion 34
Transformation 90
Reincarnation 130
Resurrection 158
Acknowledgments 190
Index 191
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First Chapter

An Excerpt from Superman: The Complete History

When Superman burst onto the scene sixty years ago there had never been a character quite like him, and he remains unique today. The innumerable imitators who followed in his wake have acknowledged his priimacy by taking on the title of super hero, but Superman did more than start the trend that came to define the American comic book. His influence spread throughout all known media as he became a star of animated cartoons, radio, recordings, books, motion pictures, and television, while his image appeared on products ranging from puzzles to peanut butter. He is perhaps the first fictional character to have been so successfully promoted as a universal icon, yet he also continues to remain a publishing phenomenon whose adventures appear in no fewer than five monthly comic magazines. This triumphant mixture of marketing and imagination, familiar all around the world and re-created for generation after generation, began humbly with an infant art form in search of a subject, and two teenagers with an improbable idea.

Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, both born in 1914, first met around 1931 when they were students at Glenville High School in Cleveland. Shuster, a native of Toronto, had recently moved into the neighborhood, and Siegel sought him out after hearing that the new arrival was an artist. "Joe and I were tremendous science fiction fans," recalled Siegel. Their friendship was forged out of a shared enthusiasm for the first magazines to publish the genre regularly, including Amazing Stories and Weird Tales. They were also interested in films, particularly those that showcased the swashbuckling exploits of silent screen star Douglas Fairbanks. In addition, they were fascinated by the newspaper comic strips of the day. "At the time that we became interested in the comics field," Siegel said, "the two outstanding adventure strips were Buck Rogers and Tarzan." Drawn by Dick Calkins and Harold Foster, respectively, these two features had introduced new elements of fantasy into the field when they first appeared in 1929. Comic books were still almost unheard of, so Shuster clipped and saved the colorful Sunday pages drawn by his favorite artists.

Conventional wisdom held that such interest in the more lurid aspects of the day's pop culture did not bode well for the two poor boys living in the depths of a disastrous economic depression, but the pair clung to the hope that such escapism might also provide them with an actual avenue of escape from the gray realities of daily life. When no money could be found to heat the Shuster apartment, Joe had to wear gloves while drawing. Jerry's after-school job as a delivery boy brought in four dollars a week to help keep his family afloat.

Most of the boys' energy was directed toward work on their school paper. Joe drew humorous cartoon features for the Glenville Torch, and most of Jerry's prose had a similarly comedic slant. Among his contributions was a series of short stories, illustrated by Joe, about "Goober the Mighty." This character was a parody of Tarzan, and the mockery indicated a certain amount of ambivalence about the idea of aggressive, muscular heroes. "In a fit of superhuman energy," Siegel wrote of Goober, "he snapped a twig between two great hands." Still, these tales from 1931 represent the first time the team toyed with the idea of a powerful protagonist. When they returned to the theme again, the superman they created would be a villain.

Outside their worlds of fantasy, Siegel and Shuster were classic nerds: bespectacled, unathletic, shy around girls. It's hardly surprising, then, that many of their dreams centered on omnipotence. While Shuster applied himself to lifting weights, Siegel began envisioning a man of limitless might. Given his unarticulated agenda of creating a modern myth that would both embody adolescent angst and offer a palliative for its pains, it's hardly surprising that it took Siegel several years to come up with the final version of Superman. What's amazing is that he ever got there at all.

While they found some satisfaction in amusing their fellow students, Siegel and Shuster's goals were a little loftier. In fact, Siegel was regularly submitting samples of his prose to the science fiction pulps, but no sales resulted. Eventually they decided to start their own little magazine, with Jerry as editor and Joe as art editor. Entitled Science Fiction, the mimeographed publication made its debut in October 1932. The preceding month, two New York youngsters named Mort Weisinger and Julius Schwartz had started a journal of news and gossip called Science Fiction Digest. These magazines, available by mail to those in the know but unseen by the general public, constituted a method of networking long before the dawn of the computer era. "One of our first subscribers was someone named Jerry Siegel from Cleveland, and he said he loved the magazine," said Schwartz, who believes it helped inspire Siegel to start a magazine where he could publish his own fiction. "Jerry wrote story after story," recalled Schwartz, "and got rejection after rejection."

"Joe and I enjoyed the pulp magazines and we two wanted to come up with some sort of heroic character," Siegel said. Pulp protagonists of note included a dark avenger called the Shadow and a scientific mastermind called Doc Savage; even the comic strip favorites Tarzan and Buck Rogers had first appeared in prose form in the rough paper pages of the pulps. Siegel and Shuster made Science Fiction (subtitled "The Advance Guard of Future Civilization") look as much like one of the professional pulp magazines as they could, with Joe's illustrations drawn in a strong style that stood up to the crude printing process. Acting as his own editor, Siegel published his short story "The Reign of the Superman" in the third issue of Science Fiction (January 1933). His first strongman, Goober the Mighty, has been a clown, and his first Superman, Bill Dunn, would be a megalomaniac.

"The Reign of the Superman" is set pointedly in the Depression of the 1930s. Bill Dunn is a homeless derelict snatched from a breadline by Professor Ernest Smalley, who needs a subject for an experiment. In a variation on the Frankenstein theme, Smalley creates a monster called the Superman out of Dunn. After being treated with an unknown chemical, Dunn escapes and gradually achieves extraordinary mental powers, which begin with telepathy and expand until he can control the thoughts of any individual he chooses to possess. As a diversion he casts his mind into outer space and views a battle between strange creatures on the planet Mars, but his more practical goal is to achive wealth, first through mental mugging, then through gambling and stock manipulation. When Smiley realizes what he has wrought, he plans to take the treatment himself, but he is killed by the Superman, who will tolerate no rivals. Dunn uses his powers to disrupt a peace conference, reasoning that war and chaos will pave the way for his conquest of the planet. The world is spared at the last minute when the effects of the experiment wear off, and Dunn shuffles away to be a forgotten man again.

Siegel seemed to be saying that the powers he could imagine would be too much for any mere human to handle, and that was the end of Superman -- at least for the time being.

"The Reign of the Superman"

Jerry Siegel's first Superman story features an ugly, evil Superman who seems completely different from the later incarnation that is so well known today. Yet there are interesting points of comparison between the two versions. The first Superman was an Earthling, but his powers came from exposure to an element found in a meteor from outer space. So the extraterrestrial concept was already in place, as was the notion of an alien rock with great powers (later to be introduced as a menace to Superman called kryptonite). And years before the creation of Clark Kent, Siegel paired his wicked but seemingly omnipotent Superman with a reporter who was not quite as helpless as he seemed. The fact that the two of them were meant to be part of a matched set was emphasized by Joe Shuster's bold drawings showing the duo confronting each other on facing pages of the magazine.

Siegel also employed some in-jokes. He published the story under the alias Herbert S. Fine, combining his mother's maiden name with the first name of the cousin who had introduced him to Joe Shuster, and he called his reporter hero Forrest Ackerman in honor of the science fiction fan who would later edit the magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland and coin the term sci fi.

Excerpted by permission of Chronicle Books. Copyright © 1998 by DC Comics.

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