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Superpollsters: How They Measure and Manipulate Public Opinion in America
     

Superpollsters: How They Measure and Manipulate Public Opinion in America

by David Moore
 

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On the eve of the 1992 presidential election, The Superpollsters: How They Measure and Manipulate Public Opinion in America takes a look at the people who tell us what we think. A public opinion pollster for twenty years, author David W. Moore includes profiles of Shere Hite, author of The Hite Report, the groundbreaking and controversial work on sexuality;

Overview

On the eve of the 1992 presidential election, The Superpollsters: How They Measure and Manipulate Public Opinion in America takes a look at the people who tell us what we think. A public opinion pollster for twenty years, author David W. Moore includes profiles of Shere Hite, author of The Hite Report, the groundbreaking and controversial work on sexuality; George Gallup, the man who broke polling practice with his 1936 prediction of Hoover's defeat and FDR's victory, the man who pioneered modern polling practices; Lou Harris, JFK's pollster, the first of the television pollsters; Pat Caddell, the man responsible first for George McGovern's, and then for Jimmy Carter's, surprise capture of the Democratic presidential nomination; Robert Teeter, pollster for Nixon, Ford, and past and current pollster for President George Bush; Richard Wirthlin, pollster for Ronald Reagan; Mervin Field, head of the California Poll; and many others. Personal advisors to the candidates, pollsters often have tremendous influence on what the top politicians say, and how they say it. Here, too, is the lively history of polling. Its increasing sophistication parallels the growing complexity of our national political scene, from its rough origins to the present day, when the pollsters—and less frequently, the voters themselves—make or break a candidate.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Moore, director of the Survey Center at the University of New Hampshire, presents a highly readable history of opinion polling, describing the promise and problems created by pollsters' influence on the political process. With his provocative introduction, an account of professional pollsters' reaction to a presentation by Shere Hite on survey response, his book covers the major players and their role in the development of techniques such as ``Hierarchical Values Map,'' the empty ballot, focus groups, and random digit dialing. Moore analyzes the impact of exit polling on election results, as well as the emergence of negative campaigns resulting from pollsters' negative influence on campaign tactics. He also examines the emergence of media polls and their role in events such as the confirmation of Justice Clarence Thomas. Highly recommended for academic and public libraries with politically active and aware patrons. Previewed in ``On the Campaign Book Trail,'' LJ 3/15/92, p. 110-12.--Ed.-- Ebba Kraar King, Melbourne P.L., Fla.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568580234
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
11/28/1995
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
426
Product dimensions:
6.42(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
1340L (what's this?)

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