Supplement Edition: Sappho: The Poems

Supplement Edition: Sappho: The Poems

by Sappho
     
 
Sappho was universally recognized by the ancients as the greatest lyric poet. Her lines are spare, bare, and subtle, or as Mosas Hadas put it, "it is ordinary language raised to its highest potential." Alongside the odes to Olympic athletes of Pindar, the wisdom verse of Hesiod, or the epic lays of Homer, Sappho's highly personal poems sound quite modern to our

Overview

Sappho was universally recognized by the ancients as the greatest lyric poet. Her lines are spare, bare, and subtle, or as Mosas Hadas put it, "it is ordinary language raised to its highest potential." Alongside the odes to Olympic athletes of Pindar, the wisdom verse of Hesiod, or the epic lays of Homer, Sappho's highly personal poems sound quite modern to our ears.
Only a few fragments of her work has survived the centuries, most of them more than one line in length are in this book.
The Supplement Edition coordinates with the student text edition, and includes the same poems (www.createspace.com/4185675).
This dialogue-style teaching supplement, the Supplement Edition: Sappho: The Poems is arranged by question and answers.
Table of Contents
Preface for teachers
Who was Sappho?
Where did Sappho live?
Who was in Sappho's family?
Map of Aeolian Greek territory
What do we know of Sappho's poetry?
What was Sappho's school like?
What was Sappho's sexual orientation?
What makes Sappho's poetry special?
What did the ancients think of Sappho?
What was the poetry tradition in Lesbos?
What was Greek poetry like?
What was unique about the Aeolian dialect?
What techniques does Sappho use?
What was Lesbos culture like
What role did Greek women play socially?
What about particular poems?
BB11. Alkaios: Violet-haired, pure
BB12. Ah, the sweet apple that reddens at the tip
BB13. Dika, braid your lovely hair
BB14. Aphrodite on your shining throne
BB21. Raise high the roof-beam, carpenters
BB22. The full wine bowl already had
BB23. Lucky bridegroom, your wedding day has come
BB23. The doorkeeper to the bridal chamber has feet
BB24. A messenger came running on powerful legs
BB25. Give up groom, we'll camp outside your door
BB26. Indeed the stars anywhere near her undisguised brilliance;
BB27. You cam. And you did well to come
BB28. To me he looks godlike
BB30. Anaktoria: Some prize the cavalry, while others favor
BB31. Love now shakes my limbs and
BB32. Atthis: Even in distant Sardis
BB34. So, I'll never see Atthis again
BB35. Leave Crete, and come to me here
BB36. Mermaids and brine-born Aphrodite, please
BB38. Hera, I pray you, may you
BB40. I have a little daughter who is like
BB41. When our girls were young
BB42. Girlhood, girlhood, when you left me
BB46. Gongyla, this is surely a sign
What is the controversy about Sappho?
Who opposed Sappho and why?
Did Sappho leap for love?
Whom did Sappho influence?
What have the modern critics said?
What problems in translating Sappho?
What English translations of Sappho?
What is Sappho's publication history?
Bibliography
Glossary

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780942208405
Publisher:
Bandanna Books
Publication date:
01/01/2011
Pages:
98
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.23(d)

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