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Supplying the Nuclear Arsenal: American Production Reactors, 1942-1992

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Although the history of commercial-power nuclear reactors is well known, the story of the government reactors that produce weapons-grade plutonium and tritium has been shrouded in secrecy. In the first detailed look at the origin and development of these production reactors, Rodney Carlisle and Joan Zenzen describe a fifty-year government effort no less complex, expensive, and technologically demanding than the Polaris or Apollo programs--yet one about which most Americans know ...

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1996 Hardcover Fair 018 Item is intact, but may show shelf wear. Pages may include notes and highlighting. May or may not include supplemental or companion material. Access ... codes may or may not work. Connecting readers since 1972. Customer service is our top priority. Read more Show Less

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Overview

Although the history of commercial-power nuclear reactors is well known, the story of the government reactors that produce weapons-grade plutonium and tritium has been shrouded in secrecy. In the first detailed look at the origin and development of these production reactors, Rodney Carlisle and Joan Zenzen describe a fifty-year government effort no less complex, expensive, and technologically demanding than the Polaris or Apollo programs--yet one about which most Americans know virtually nothing.

Carlisle and Zenzen describe the evolution of the early reactors, the atomic weapons establishment that surrounded them, and the sometimes bitter struggles between business and political constituencies for their share of "nuclear pork." They show how, since the 1980s, aging production reactors have increased the risk of radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and water table. And they describe how the Department of Energy mounted a massive effort to find the right design for a new generation of reactors, only to abandon that effort with the end of the Cold War. Today, all American production reactors remain closed.

Due to short half-life, the nation's supply of tritium, crucial to modern weapons, is rapidly dwindling. As countries like Iraq and North Korea threaten to join the nuclear club, the authors contend, the United States needs to revitalize tritium production capacity in order to maintain a viable nuclear deterrent. Meanwhile, as slowly decaying artifacts of the Cold War, the closed production reactors at Hanford, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina, loom ominously over the landscape.

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Editorial Reviews

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While controversy rages around commercial-power nuclear reactors, reactors shrouded in secrecy have been producing weapons-grade plutonium and titanium for 50 years in the US. Historians Carlisle (Rutgers U.) and Zenzen trace the history, the pork- barrel tussles between businesses and political constituencies, and the massive technological and financial investment. They also point out that the now aging reactors are becoming ever more liable to failure and accident, and that though all the plants are closed now, the nuclear fuel is decaying toward its half- life and will need to be replenished if the US is to remain the toughest kid on the block. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801852077
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/1990
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 6.33 (w) x 9.29 (h) x 1.08 (d)

Meet the Author

Rodney P. Carlisle is professor of history at Rutgers University and vice president of History Associates, Inc., of Rockville, Maryland. Joan M. Zenzen is a staff historian at History Associates, Inc.

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