Supporting Expeditionary Aerospace Forces: Expanded Analysis of Lantirn Options

Overview

This analysis addresses logistics structure alternatives for meeting demands for Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) across a spectrum of operational requirements. The study amends earlier research with new data collected during the air war over Serbia by comparing the current decentralized policy with consolidated options in which maintenance capabilities do not deploy. Consolidating the LANTIRN intermediate maintenance support system may enhance operational flexibility, improve ...

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Overview

This analysis addresses logistics structure alternatives for meeting demands for Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) across a spectrum of operational requirements. The study amends earlier research with new data collected during the air war over Serbia by comparing the current decentralized policy with consolidated options in which maintenance capabilities do not deploy. Consolidating the LANTIRN intermediate maintenance support system may enhance operational flexibility, improve support responsiveness, and decrease the requirements for highly skilled personnel. However, a regional support structure would be more sensitive to transportation delays and require greater cross-organizational communication. New data suggest that the USAF may not have enough equipment to support two coincident wars. The decision to centralize or decentralize LANTIRN repair operations hinges on the capability and risk levels the Air Force is willing to accommodate.

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Supporting Expeditionary Aerospace Forces

Expanded Analysis of LANTIRN Options
By Amatzia Feinberg Hyman L. Shulman Louis W. Miller Robert S. Tripp

Rand Corporation

Copyright © 2001 Amatzia Feinberg
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780833029034


Preface

Although much work remains to define and prepare Air Force units for Expeditionary Aerospace Force (EAF) responsibilities, it is clear that EAF concepts will play a central role in the future Air Force. The EAF relies on rapidly deployable, immediately employable, and highly flexible forces to serve a strategic role as an alternative to a large permanent forward presence in deterring and responding to aggressive acts. EAF success will, to a great extent, depend on the effectiveness and efficiency of the system supporting flying operations. The Air Force has named such a support system one of its six necessary core competencies and labeled it the Agile Combat Support (ACS) system.

ACS efficiency and effectiveness are affected by decisions made across planning, programming, and budgeting system timelines. Far-term ACS decisions affect support structures required to meet future operational requirements. Mid-term ACS decisions affect the design, development, and evolution of the support infrastructure for meeting operational requirements within the programming and budgeting time horizons. Near-term decisions affect where, when, and how existing resources are employed. Across this time spectrum, logistics requirements can be satisfied in a variety of ways, each with different costs, flexibility, response times, and risks. This study addresses logistics structure alternatives for meeting demands for Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night (LANTIRN) across the spectrum of EAF operational requirements from major theater wars to peacetime operations and amends earlier RAND research with new data collected during the Air War Over Serbia (AWOS).

In this study we compare the current decentralized policy, in which intermediate maintenance capabilities are deployed with flying units, with consolidated options in which maintenance capabilities do not deploy. This dipole decision space offers many opportunities while introducing multiple risks-all of which the Air Force must consider.

This research, sponsored by the Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Installations and Logistics (AF/IL), was conducted in the Resource Management Program of Project AIR FORCE. This and related projects seek to identify ways of enhancing the effectiveness of the Air Expeditionary Force.

This report should be of interest to logisticians, operators, and mobility planners throughout the Air Force. It is one of a series addressing ACS options to enhance the effectiveness of EAF operations. Other titles in this series include An Integrated Strategic Agile Combat Support Planning Framework (MR-1056-AF, 1999), New Agile Combat Support Postures (MR-1075-AF, 2000), Flexbasing: Achieving Global Presence for Expeditionary Aerospace Forces (MR-1113-AF, 2000), An Analysis of F-15 Avionics Options (MR-1174-AF, 2000), and A Concept for Evolving the Agile Combat Support/Mobility System of the Future (MR-1179-AF, 2000).

PROJECT AIR FORCE

Project AIR FORCE, a division of RAND, is the Air Force Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) for studies and analyses. It provides the Air Force with independent analyses of policy alternatives affecting the development, employment, combat readiness, and support of current and future aerospace forces. Research is performed in four programs: Aerospace Force Development; Manpower, Personnel, and Training; Resource Management; and Strategy and Doctrine.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Supporting Expeditionary Aerospace Forces by Amatzia Feinberg Hyman L. Shulman Louis W. Miller Robert S. Tripp Copyright © 2001 by Amatzia Feinberg. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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Table of Contents

Preface
Figures
Summary
Acknowledgments
Acronyms
Ch. 1 Introduction 1
Ch. 2 Analytic Approach, LANTIRN Scenarios and Options 13
Ch. 3 Support Options and Performance Measurements 25
Ch. 4 Evaluating the Options 45
App. A: Model Flow Chart and Computation Example 51
App. B: Test Set Availability 57
App. C: Step Function of Supply Capacity 61
App. D: Virtual Regional Concept 63
App. E: Logistics Structures and LRU Spares Requirements 65
App. F: Sensitivity Analysis 69
App. G: Transportation Costs 77
App. H: Cash Flow Calculations 79
Bibliography 85
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