Supreme Courtship

( 37 )

Overview

President of the United States Donald Vanderdamp is having a hell of a time getting his nominees appointed to the Supreme Court. After one nominee is rejected for insufficiently appreciating To Kill A Mockingbird, the president chooses someone so beloved by voters that the Senate won't have the guts to reject her — Judge Pepper Cartwright, the star of the nation's most popular reality show, Courtroom Six.

Will Pepper, a straight-talking Texan, survive a confirmation battle in ...

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Supreme Courtship

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Overview

President of the United States Donald Vanderdamp is having a hell of a time getting his nominees appointed to the Supreme Court. After one nominee is rejected for insufficiently appreciating To Kill A Mockingbird, the president chooses someone so beloved by voters that the Senate won't have the guts to reject her — Judge Pepper Cartwright, the star of the nation's most popular reality show, Courtroom Six.

Will Pepper, a straight-talking Texan, survive a confirmation battle in the Senate? Will becoming one of the most powerful women in the world ruin her love life? And even if she can make it to the Supreme Court, how will she get along with her eight highly skeptical colleagues, including a floundering Chief Justice who, after legalizing gay marriage, learns that his wife has left him for another woman.

Soon, Pepper finds herself in the middle of a constitutional crisis, a presidential reelection campaign that the president is determined to lose, and oral arguments of a romantic nature. Supreme Courtship is another classic Christopher Buckley comedy about the Washington institutions most deserving of ridicule.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
President Donald Vanderdamp has had enough. One by one, the petty dictators of the Senate have been rejecting his candidates for the Supreme Court, citing reasons he can hardly fathom. To take revenge, the irate chief executive nominates the one jurist no red-blooded American male could refuse: Judge Pepper Cartwright, the super-hot, sharp-tongued star of television's most popular reality justice program. After sometimes tempestuous confirmation hearings, Pepper wiggles into her new job on the nation's highest court, where she faces constitutional crises of a whole new stripe. A hilarious, bipartisan uplift by the author of Boomsday and Thank You for Smoking.
Fortune
"The quintessential political novelist of our time."
Sunday Times of London
"An accomplished comic novelist and raucously funny political satirist."
Boston Globe
"One of the rarest political specimens-- the authentically comic writer."
Booklist
Buckley's ingenious and mischievous tale of a Washington shakeup via an injection of good old American authenticity is funny and entertaining . . . clever, merry, escapist.
Lisa Zeidner
The premise of Christopher Buckley's new political comedy, Supreme Courtship, isn't all that far-fetched. In fact... this novel could more accurately be called near-fetched — disarmingly, hilariously so... You'll be belly-laughing through Buckley's byzantine plot, which includes Peester v. Spendo-Max Corp., a case in which a male shoplifter stuffing merchandise into a burqa sues the Reno police force for racial and religious profiling, and ends with the Supreme Court deciding a presidential election. As the president sighs, "It's not as though we haven't been there before." Last go-around, it wasn't quite so uproarious.
The Washington Post
New York Daily News
"Hilarious . . . the book is full of wry observations on the follies of Washington high life. What makes it laugh-out-loud funny is Buckley's sense of how little you have to exaggerate to make Washington seem absurd."
Adam Woog
Christopher Buckley is America's greatest living political satirist. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it . . . Just take my word for it, and the word is: delicious.
Seattle Times
USA Today
"What sets Buckley apart is his ability to mock Washington yet convey a genuine admiration for many of its residents . . . Buckley remains hilarious."
Hartford Courant
"[Supreme Courtship] is full of such tasty nuggets, along with arcane Latin phrases and mirth-inducing names like Blyster Forkmorgan . . . One of the book's telling points is that he never mentions which poltical parties these folks represent, and you realize it doesn't much matetr. When you are sketching a political cartton, donkeys and elephants alike are juicy targets."

Chicago Sun-Times
You can't make this stuff up . . . Unless of course you are Christopher Buckley, son of the late William, whose fictional satires are must-reads for those looking to understand our cultural moment, or at least have a few laughs at it. Buckley is a master at cooking up scenarios that are wild without being entirely absurd and populating them with attractive characters...
Blake Wilson
Once again, Buckley returns to his pet theme: the vanity and perfidy of the capital's ruling elite. And once again he delivers serious insights along with antics . . . Buckley has fun with the court's fractious politics and even more fun riffing on the strange creatures and customs of its marble halls . . . Buckley lampoons as an insider. A onetime speechwriter for George H.W. Bush, he knows the monograms on the linens and has supped with kings. But he's more an anthropologist than a settler of scores. His own libertarian-leaning politics shine through his narratives without weighing them down. And he's admirably fair-minded, skewering politically correct crusaders on one page and holy-rolling bigots on the next. His villains are Washington's ideologues, left and right, whose principles always boil down to self-regard. Buckley's heart belongs to the outsiders and mavericks who see through all the spin. Each of his novels may be light as air, but bit by bit they're building up into a significant social portrait, the beginnings of a vast Comédie-Washingtonienne . . . At a time of high political absurdity, Buckley remains our sharpest guide to the capital, and amore serious one than we may suppose.
New York Times Review of Books
Blake Wilson - New York Times Review of Books
"Once again, Buckley returns to his pet theme: the vanity and perfidy of the capital's ruling elite. And once again he delivers serious insights along with antics . . . Buckley has fun with the court's fractious politics and even more fun riffing on the strange creatures and customs of its marble halls . . . Buckley lampoons as an insider. A onetime speechwriter for George H.W. Bush, he knows the monograms on the linens and has supped with kings. But he's more an anthropologist than a settler of scores. His own libertarian-leaning politics shine through his narratives without weighing them down. And he's admirably fair-minded, skewering politically correct crusaders on one page and holy-rolling bigots on the next. His villains are Washington's ideologues, left and right, whose principles always boil down to self-regard. Buckley's heart belongs to the outsiders and mavericks who see through all the spin. Each of his novels may be light as air, but bit by bit they're building up into a significant social portrait, the beginnings of a vast Comédie-Washingtonienne . . . At a time of high political absurdity, Buckley remains our sharpest guide to the capital, and amore serious one than we may suppose."
Chicago Sun Times
"You can't make this stuff up . . . Unless of course you are Christopher Buckley, son of the late William, whose fictional satires are must-reads for those looking to understand our cultural moment, or at least have a few laughs at it. Buckley is a master at cooking up scenarios that are wild without being entirely absurd and populating them with attractive characters..."
Lisa Zeidner - The Washington Post
"The premise of Christopher Buckley's new political comedy, Supreme Courtship, isn't all that far-fetched. In fact... this novel could more accurately be called near-fetched -- disarmingly, hilariously so... You'll be belly-laughing through Buckley's byzantine plot, which includes Peester v. Spendo-Max Corp., a case in which a male shoplifter stuffing merchandise into a burqa sues the Reno police force for racial and religious profiling, and ends with the Supreme Court deciding a presidential election. As the president sighs, "It's not as though we haven't been there before." Last go-around, it wasn't quite so uproarious."
Adam Woog - Seattle Times
"Christopher Buckley is America's greatest living political satirist. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it . . . Just take my word for it, and the word is: delicious."
Tom Wolfe
"One of the funniest writers in the English language."
Lisa Zeidner
You don't read a Buckley novel for the depth of character development. With her rodeo slang and cowboy boots, Pepper is Texas-trite, but no matter. You'll be belly-laughing through Buckley's byzantine plot, which includes Peester v. Spendo-Max Corp., a case in which a male shoplifter stuffing merchandise into a burqa sues the Reno police force for racial and religious profiling, and ends with the Supreme Court deciding a presidential election. As the president sighs, "It's not as though we haven't been there before." Last go-around, it wasn't quite so uproarious.
—The Washington Post
Blake Wilson
Once again, Buckley returns to his pet theme: the vanity and perfidy of the capital's ruling elite. And once again he delivers serious insights along with antics…part of Buckley's charm is that he seems to wink every time he sends off a groaner. But at his best he is very, very funny. The novel's main courtroom set piece—Cartwright's handling of her first oral argument—succeeds not only as comedy but also as an effective parody of a singular and sometimes bizarre ritual.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

It's a delicious prospect: what if a beleaguered president decided to nominate a TV judge to the Supreme Court? Buckley effectively ransacks the Washington political machine for his newest novel, disarmingly read by Anne Heche. No stranger to controversy herself, Heche takes a special glee in depicting media gone mad. For Pepper Cartwright, the "plain ole girl from Plano" who finds herself on the bench, Heche effectively channels Annie Potts. Yet Heche is equally effective delivering the rest of the overwhelmingly male characters, ranging from the Midwestern President Vandercamp to a patrician fixer and Pepper's flashy producer husband. Supreme satirical novelist Buckley gives the narrator plenty of clues, and Heche delivers the annoying laugh and calculating tones of justice wannabe Senator Mitchell with hilarious exactitude. Despite the preponderance of men in Supreme Courtship, it is the brilliant casting of Heche-who keeps Pepper present at all times-that gives this audiobook an edge over the print edition. A Twelve hardcover (Reviews, June 9). (Sept.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

When the Senate Judiciary Committee shoots down two of his Supreme Court nominees, lame duck president Donald Vanderdamp nominates a feisty, tell-it-like-it-is Texan who's also the star of a reality show. What follows is a laugh-a-minute story from New York Times best-selling author/genius political satirist Buckley (Boomsday) that practically screams "Hollywood box office hit." Actress Anne Heche superbly portrays the zany cast of characters, some who bear an uncanny resemblance to real inhabitants of Capitol Hill. One of the funniest books of the year; highly recommended for public libraries and politicians with a sense of humor. [Audio clip available through www.hachettebookgroup.com; from the review of the Twelve hc, "Buckley is a master at setting up ridiculous relationships, and he doesn't disappoint here," LJ7/08.-Ed.]
—Valerie Piechocki

Kirkus Reviews
As before, Buckley (Boomsday, 2007, etc.) blurs the line distinguishing the historical, the plausible and the preposterous amid the political circus of anything-goes Washington. The satiric scenario has plenty of potential, but sketchy characters and slapdash plotting result in a split decision. On a Supreme Court as divided as the country, President Donald Vanderdamp finds his first two nominees to fill a crucial vacancy rejected on the shakiest of grounds (one wrote a grade-school review of To Kill a Mockingbird and found parts of the movie "kind of boring"). With his popularity at an all-time low and with no intention of running for a second term, the president then dares the Senate to reject his third nominee, America's most popular jurist, Pepper Cartwright of television's highly rated Courtroom Six. After she sails through the confirmation process, both the new justice and the novel seem to lose their way. Instead of relying on the common sense and colloquial language that have made her such a hit as a TV personality, she tries her best to apply legal precedent befitting the Supreme Court, thus alienating many of her fellow justices and most of the public. She also becomes estranged from her husband, a reality-show producer, and involved with the chief justice, whose wife left him for a woman immediately after the court sanctioned gay marriage. After a politician-turned-TV-actor challenges for the presidency, the novel inevitably reaches its climax as the contested race is left to the court to decide. Yet questions remain: Why is the president so unpopular? (He vetoes every spending bill, which would surely enrage Congress, but shouldn't upset the public.) Why does Pepper take allthe heat for every split decision? (Four other justices vote with her, and the court had a history of 5-4 decisions before her arrival.) Why does Buckley think it's enough to give his characters funny names (Blyster Forkmorgan, Esquire, et al.) rather than develop them?Even Buckley fans might suspect that he's begun to crank them out a little too quickly. Agent: Amanda Urban/ICM
Tom Alderman
Narrator Anne Heche has the right edge to her voice to underscore Buckley's wry humor. She also delvers warmth and sensitivity whenever needed....If you're comic sensibilities coincide with Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert, this incisive Buckley lampoon is right up your alley.
The Huffington Post
Tom Alderman - The Huffington Post
Narrator Anne Heche has the right edge to her voice to underscore Buckley's wry humor. She also delvers warmth and sensitivity whenever needed....If you're comic sensibilities coincide with Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert, this incisive Buckley lampoon is right up your alley.
Philadelphia Inquirer
"GREAT CHARACTERS, GREAT NARRATOR, GREAT FUN: Politics was never so much fun before Christopher Buckley got a hold of it and gave it a good shake.... Throughout, Garofalo plays this shtick like the maestro of an oddball orchestra, to which we can only say, 'Brava!'"(Praise for BOOMSDAY)
From the Publisher
"Everything you expect from good satire. The narrative is timely and amusing, but the real revelation is Janeane Garofalo's reading. She's great as the voice of Cassandra, the 29-year-old blogger who instigates this social revolution, and she's also excellent at voicing the roundtable of special interests-a right-wing evangelist, a dirty-tricks president, and a gung-ho senator who is an amputee. The result is a truly democratic audiobook that makes fun of all parties equally."—AudioFile Magazine

"GREAT CHARACTERS, GREAT NARRATOR, GREAT FUN: Politics was never so much fun before Christopher Buckley got a hold of it and gave it a good shake.... Throughout, Garofalo plays this shtick like the maestro of an oddball orchestra, to which we can only say, 'Brava!'"(Praise for BOOMSDAY)—Philadelphia Inquirer

Narrator Anne Heche has the right edge to her voice to underscore Buckley's wry humor. She also delvers warmth and sensitivity whenever needed....If you're comic sensibilities coincide with Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert, this incisive Buckley lampoon is right up your alley.—Tom Alderman, The Huffington Post

Buckley effectively ransacks the Washington political machine for his newest novel, disarmingly read by Anne Heche. No stranger to controversy herself, Heche takes a special glee in depicting media gone mad...Supreme satirical novelist Buckley gives the narrator plenty of clues, and Heche delivers the annoying laugh and calculating tones of justice wannabe Senator Mitchell with hilarious exactitude. Despite the preponderance of men in Supreme Courtship, it is the brilliant casting of Heche-who keeps Pepper present at all times-that gives this audiobook an edge over the print edition.—Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446697989
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/7/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 265,295
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Christopher Buckley
Christopher Buckley, "the quintessential political novelist of his time" according to Fortune magazine, is the winner of the distinguished ninth annual Thurber Prize for American Humor. Tom Wolfe has described him as "one of the funniest writers in the English language."

Buckley is the author of eleven books, many of them national bestsellers, including Thank You For Smoking, God Is My Broker, No Way To Treat A First Lady, and Florence of Arabia. His books have been translated into over a dozen languages, including Russian and Korean.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 37 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(16)

3 Star

(6)

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(2)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Quo Vadis

    Should a television judge be appointed to the Supreme Court? Aren't there more qualified judges available? Do we need to know Latin to read this book? Are there too many legalisms for the average reader? Is it pretty funny, all things considered, or does Buckley try to hard? If you read the book, these will all be questions for you to decide. As for me, I laughed a lot, but then I am a lawyer who studied Latin.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2012

    Good Fun

    Good book, thought it started out great, but then lost a bit of momentum.

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  • Posted August 29, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Pretty good and pretty funny!

    I'm not a very political person but I liked the premise here. A satirical look at the Presidency, Supreme Court, reality televisions, and America as a whole was already funny to me. Here Christopher Buckley do a good job with the funny as he pokes jabs at nearly every corner of DC. While the plot was somewhat farcical the idea itself is just crazy enough to work and that in and of itself was hilarious. The dialogue was often funny but slowed down in the Supreme Court scenes and was, too me, overly political that the jokes might have went over my head or just simply missed the mark. I enjoyed this but I'm not sure how many of these types of politically based fiction books I could read. Overall, a funny plot with some lagging dialogue. A pretty good book.

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  • Posted January 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A wonderfully witty satire of the American political circus

    What do you do when you're the President of the United States and you're fed up because your snarky Congressman rival is making the lives of your Supreme Court nominees hell? Get even. By nominating the super popular judge of a reality court TV show to the highest Court in the land. That's what President Vanderdamp decides to do in Supreme Courtship, and it makes for some great laughs as we follow Judge Pepper Cartwright through the confirmation process and into her role on the Supreme Court. This is the first of Buckley's books that I have read (though I have seen the movie Thank You for Smoking and loved the premise, and have Boomsday sitting on my bookshelf), but it definitely will not be the last. The book was a fantastic mockery of American politics, and the humor is witty and intelligent but still laugh-out-loud funny. I think it would make for a fun read for anybody, no matter their level of interest in politics, but I especially found it hilarious because of my own personal obsessions with the Supreme Court and the legal system. Supreme Courtship is an easy to follow, wickedly funny satire.

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  • Posted July 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Made Me Smarter By The Minute

    If I was gauging this book against his other books, it would probably generate a 3.5 stars. But even though it's not his best work, it still stands head and shoulders above the rest. Hence, the five star rating.

    This is such a clever novel dealing with a silly process. A disenchanted president nominates a beautiful reality tv judge to the lands highest court much to the chagrin of an egocentric senator and who ends up comforting a chief justice jilted by his gay wife. These characters set the stage for a highly amusing novel with plenty of laugh out loud moments. And don't worry if you think the subject is too highbrow. Buckley has plenty of footnotes that help to decipher the convoluted and pompous Washington-speak.

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  • Posted July 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Buckley does DC satire better than anyone!

    The first half of this book is incredible. Fast moving, intelligent and laugh out loud funny. Any second half is going to end up looking less than good in comparison. And it's true - the second half does not live up to the first half... But even a less than perfect Buckley is still better than most other writers. Highly recommended!

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  • Posted December 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Supreme Courtship - fun, witty, accessible

    Fast paced and witty, Supreme Courtship lampoons the politicized Supreme Court confirmation process and grandstanding Senators. Not surprisingly, the most sympathetic characters in this political novel the less ambitious ones: Pepper Cartwright, President Vanderdamp, and presidential advisor Graydon Clenndennynn. Full of absurd situations, Supreme Courtship is an unexpectedly fun and accessible read.

    Publisher: Twelve; 1 edition (September 7, 2009), 304 pages.
    Review copy provided by the publisher.

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  • Posted November 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Exceptionally Well-Read Farce with Memorable Characters

    I "read" at least one audiobook per week and enjoyed this audiobook immensely. Buckley's characters are refreshing and funny: a down-home Texas TV judge, a suicidal Chief Justice jilted by his lesbian wife, a veto-prone and hyper-principled President who doesn't care about re-election, a scheming television producer, et al. Initially, I kept thinking the farcical plot was a bit over-the-top, but, on reflection, I think the farce was successful precisely because it hit uncomfortably close to the real-world mark in exposing the flaws of the confirmation process and the vapidity of our society. I didn't purchase the book the first several times I saw it because I'm generally not a fan of the reader, Anne Heche. However, I am now, and I'll actively seek audiobooks she reads in the future. Her performance was absolutely excellent.

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  • Posted September 26, 2009

    SUPREMELY CLEVER, WITTY AND INTELLIGENT READ !!

    CHARACTER NAMES ARE FABULOUS AND PARTICULARLY ORIGINAL !!
    I ENJOYED EVERY LAUGH-OUT-MOMENT BETWEEN THE COVERS OF MR. BUCKLEY'S BOOK !!

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  • Posted January 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Politics Can Be Fun-Supreme Courtship

    I had never read one of Christopher Buckleys books, so I had no idea what to expect. He has managed to take Washington and all its denizens, and make them likeable and oh so human, in this witty and entertaining book. Pepper is a televison judge, and the President has decided to try and get her appointed as the next Supreme Court justice, after all his other picks got the boot! She reminds me of an intelligent Sarah Palin, and the book is a hoot! I recommend this novel,if you like politics, and enjoy watching the politicos being made to look ALL too human. <BR/>After finishing this, I read Little green Men, also by Buckley, and it was great. I recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Witty, Sarcastic Humor

    I chose this book to read next in my pile from the library to take a break from some of the more serious fiction I had just finished (see my suggested recommendations following the review). I knew what to expect. I've read several of Christopher Buckley's novels, and you either are a fan of his witty, sarcastic, intellectual humor--or you're not. (I am)Yes, Supreme Courtship overuses a lot of Latin phrases that don't help much if you don't know Latin (I don't), but the point made on we the uneducated masses is that these Supreme Court justices were all more interested in one-upping eachother with their inflated knowledge of cases and legal-ese than in working together. Buckley's novels are more a humorous inside look at the stuffy, posturing, image-making that makes up our political process and what happens when you throw these folks into unbelievable, crazy situations. This particular novel was a welcome, humorous respite after the overly long Presidential campaign, and reminiscent of a couple of his earlier works, "The White House Mess" and "No Way to Treat a First Lady." The book cover did nothing for me, but the posed picture of Buckley chewing on the end of his glasses was classic--it would be just the sort of pose he might allude one of his characters had practiced dilligently in an effort to look thoughtful or pensive.

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  • Posted October 27, 2008

    Made me chuckle out loud. Having lived in DC this book made me recall my time living there and being subjected to the inane antics in the Congress.

    I originally found this book on line at an audio down load site. Listened to the book and decided it was a must have. Bought it, read it and I much prefer turning a page than listening. Pepper Cartwright is a hoot. I envisioned judge Judy going through a Senate conformation hearing. Mr Buckley's characters are a great blending of all that is Capital Hill.

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    Posted December 22, 2008

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